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Bloody fools having a go at much needed regulation of charity BBQs

By johnboy - 3 November 2013 68

The Canberra Times is carrying a chorus of idiots criticizing some very sensible regulation of charity barbecues.

This supposedly onerous regulation is requiring organisations that conduct more than five fundraising bbqs a year get a $150 certification to make sure at least one of them knows what the hell they are doing.

The Chamber of Commerce’s Andrew Blyth has either not graced Bunnings on a Saturday morning or has some really amusing reading material in his commode:

ACT and Region Chamber of Commerce and Industry chief executive Andrew Blyth said he hoped it would be changed to protect community groups.

”Sporting clubs are run by people who volunteer time and they don’t need someone in a high-vis vest telling them when to turn the sausages,” he said.

”These people have been running barbecues for years.

Many of them have been running these BBQs badly for years, and frankly they do need someone telling them when to turn sausages, and more importantly how to keep them safe to eat between cooking and serving.

Five BBQs a year without bothering to learn some basic food safety is arguably too many.

What’s Your opinion?


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68 Responses to
Bloody fools having a go at much needed regulation of charity BBQs
Pitchka 8:44 am 04 Nov 13

Known fact….

Women love sausages, no matter the size… (and so do some men)…

Darkfalz 8:38 am 04 Nov 13

I’d be less worried about the organisation that does 5 or more of these a year than the places which do a one off for fund raising. I had some undercooked sausages at Sfoglia a few months ago. I could taste they were not fully cooked, but I still ate them. I didn’t fall ill, but I wonder why I did that.

torpedo 7:17 am 04 Nov 13

Where’s the evidence sausage sizzles are harmful to human health? There’s risk and there’s risk. I wonder if they’ll pay an inspector overtime to work Saturdays to visit footy clubs etc? As usual more questions than answers arise when our Health Protection service intervenes on our behalf ….

HiddenDragon 12:12 am 04 Nov 13

The offerings from those charity BBQs often smell better than they taste, so I usually manage to resist the urge – still, I would be much less worried about the risks from an uncertificated BBQ than from iatrogenesis at one of our peerless and heavily regulated public health institutions.

Masquara 10:53 pm 03 Nov 13

breda said :

The trouble with your thesis, JB, is that the person with the “food safety training” is not even required to be on site. They just have to be “contactable”,whatever that means. So, presumably if people start keeling over and throwing up, you call the person with the certificate? Right.

In a lifetime of eating charity sausage sandwiches, I have never had so much as a tummy rumble. Indeed, in the CT article the govvie spokesperson, when asked, could not cite a single case of food poisoning that could be traced back to a charity sausage sizzle. Hardly a “clear and present danger”, then.

These people will not be satisfied until we need the government’s permission to sneeze.

No doubt Katie Gallagher’s town council clerks were instructed to compensate for the loss of the Arboretum income toute de suite by hitting up Canberra’s most community-minded burghers.

BimboGeek 9:53 pm 03 Nov 13

$150 is cheaper than the 8 hour food safety supervisor course that has to be taken by one person (at least) in each commercial food handling business.

The requirements for temporary food stands are already ridiculously low, only a page or two.

In other jurisdictions everyone who works around food needs a basic food handlers certification. Food handling is a matter of simple guidelines anyone can follow but if you haven’t been told, how can you know? First, kitchens are disinfected at least daily, their grills meticulously scrubbed to as-new cleanliness with grill cleaner. Would you know how to do that? Sausages may certainly be not thrown out “at the end of the day” as suggested. Food must be kept under temperature control and when it has been outside of temperature control for 2 hpurs over its total lifetime, it will be thrown out before the clock reaches 4 hours. Do you know how to use a utensil soak and dedicated tools for different foods? Which coloured chopping board is for raw meat vs cooked? There is already a free food handlers’ course and everyone should be encouraged to complete it but the benefit of formal training is discussion, the opportunity to ask questions and get clarification, to benchmark against your colleagues… Plus of course training is somewhat more rigorous.

Responsible service of alcohol at community events is treated exactly the same way. You want th government to protect your health when you buy prepared food and they are taking some pretty minimal steps here. Food safety is no joke, as Madam Cholet can tell you (salmonella can seriously harm unborn babies and she must have been terrified.)

Pork Hunt 9:28 pm 03 Nov 13

Any non Queenslander would agree that we need less government interference in our Iives, not more…

joingler 9:16 pm 03 Nov 13

I am in agreement with CT on this one.

In August I was required to do the food safety supervisor course for work. Although I can understand having to do it, I did not learn anything there. You have 2-3 hours of being told to wear gloves, wash hands regularly how to properly defrost/cook food.

Forcing small not-for-profit organisations to have someone to do this course is just ridiculous.

If someone can point me to a report/statistics that shows food poisoning at such events is/was a problem in ACT then I will happily eat my words.

breda 7:28 pm 03 Nov 13

The trouble with your thesis, JB, is that the person with the “food safety training” is not even required to be on site. They just have to be “contactable”,whatever that means. So, presumably if people start keeling over and throwing up, you call the person with the certificate? Right.

In a lifetime of eating charity sausage sandwiches, I have never had so much as a tummy rumble. Indeed, in the CT article the govvie spokesperson, when asked, could not cite a single case of food poisoning that could be traced back to a charity sausage sizzle. Hardly a “clear and present danger”, then.

These people will not be satisfied until we need the government’s permission to sneeze.

JC 6:35 pm 03 Nov 13

Here’s the problem. Government doesn’t do something, someone gets sick people complain the government didn’t do enough. They do something, people complain too much regulation.

Frankly reading the ‘regulation’ you need to hold more than 4 or 5 events in a year to need this, and only then do you need 1 person trained at a cost of $150. That person doesn’t even need to be on site just on the phone.

Sound pretty reasonable for the vast majority of charities, they either won’t do them enough to need a trained person or will do it often enough (say sporting venues who do it every week) that $150 is not so bad.

Also was thinking wonder why with BBQ’s at Bunnings etc the trained person couldn’t be a member of staff, rather than the actual charity. After all they provide more or less everything else in support, so would make perfect sense.

shauno 6:13 pm 03 Nov 13

Yep and every single bit of extra regulation in the Australian way of life just adds to cost of living. We have just had swimming pools now requiring registration in NSW. We now have BBQs now lets have a guess at whats next maybe they will regulated what food can be purchased in different check out coounters. Oh yea thats right they are doing that s well. Dont be fooled each added bit of regulation adds up over time.

In the last 20 years ive worked all over the world and have been to between 50 and 100 countries I cant be bothered working it out and i kid you not Australia is one of the most over regulated countries on Earth. Our cost of living is way more then it should be and it used to be a lot cheaper living in Australian then the UK. Well not any more I know quiet a few people that work in my industry that have moved back to the UK from Australia because of the costs. And in this job we can live anywhere in the world and they chose to move to Australia but things have changed now.

gooterz 6:02 pm 03 Nov 13

Finally a licence to cook, why so expensive?
If government funded a bbq health course wouldn’t that actually improve the waiting times at the hospital..
I’ve done many bbq’s for the masses its not that hard to tell people the snags aren’t done.
Its poor form to undertook a free bbq, its a crime to do it when your selling the snags.

Masquara 5:29 pm 03 Nov 13

Unlike the risks in a dirty kitchen, sausages served sizzling hot on the day, with leftovers disposed of, again, on the day, would be very unlikely to pose a food poisoning hazard. Surely $20 should cover a certificate, with an online course.

gentoopenguin 5:08 pm 03 Nov 13

If the Multicultural Festival gets regulated for a one-off event, I don’t see why community groups peddling sausages outside Bunnings shouldn’t either.

Madam Cholet 4:55 pm 03 Nov 13

This might come in handy for the group which was at Bunnings Tuggers last week. Had about 50 people working the stall and yet they still could not produce barely a sausage. And when it did arrive, it was probably slightly underdone. Having had salmonella once whilst pregnant, it’s not an experience I wish to repeat. It might seem a trivial matter – cooking a few snags using a trusty old barbie whilst having enormous fun at the same time to raise some money, but yes, in this day and age it’s probably odd that they have not yet had some kind of regulation slapped over them.

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