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Boo-hoo, Adam

By Marcus Paul 30 July 2015 61

afl ground

There’s plenty in the news cycle this week about AFL star Adam Goodes.

Or should that be indigenous star? Or maybe Australian of the Year, AFL legend and Aboriginal rights campaigner Adam Goodes.

After all, I don’t want to offend. Or even worse, appear racist.

Either way, I’m of the opinion the man is always playing the victim. He’s called Australia a racist country … and he is our Australian of the Year.

He speaks of Invasion Day, and calls fans from opposition teams ‘bigots’ for daring to boo him at games. And he’s kindly reminded us to “remember whose lands you’re on”.

It’s this antagonism toward a nation which has bestowed one of its highest honours upon him that grates with me. I applaud indigenous peoples who try to advance themselves, and indeed causes which they are passionate about. And I celebrate with fellow Australians the effort and achievements of so many indigenous athletes both past and present.

My current sporting idol is Johnathon Thurston. He is named by many as the best rugby league player in the world, but he is simply more than that. My personal experience with Thurston has led me to believe he is someone who perhaps the “spear throwing, war cry” favouring Goodes should look to.

Thurston is a bloke who’s done more for race relations than Adam Goodes ever could. His methods are simple, respectful and above else non-divisive. From handing out headgear to young fans at each game (at both half time and full time) to always picking up his kicking tee and giving it to ball boys with a pat on the back or rub on the head thrown in. It’s these subtleties which I believe garner respect and admiration.

This writer also recalls seeing Thurston playing impromptu games of touch footy with holiday makers, children mostly, on Magnetic Island just off the Coast from his beloved Townsville. These were not media-organised photo opportunities but a genuine proud indigenous man simply living and loving life – and not jumping on a soap box to scream inequality at every chance.

There is no doubt Adam Goodes is a brilliant AFL talent. On the field his achievements are plentiful – Brownlow Medals and Premierships. Off the field however, he’s way out of form.

Marcus Paul is the host of Canberra Live 3pm weekdays on 2CC.


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Boo-hoo, Adam
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Nilrem 9:41 am 31 Jul 15

Mysteryman said :

Nilrem said :

Mysteryman said :

mcs said :

Mysteryman said :

mcs said :

I keep hearing about him ‘bullying and shaming’ the 13 year old girl. Lets not forget the details of the incident however:
– She made what most would consider to be a clearly racist remark – and most definitely Goodes saw it that way.
– He clearly did not know at the time of pointing her out that she was 13 – he reacted to the comment from the crowd, not the person.
Yes, she was young and immature, but I don’t think that should be any excuse for ignorance.
– Goodes showed significant compassion and empathy in the aftermath, asking for support, education and empathy for the girl.
http://www.abc.net.au/news/2013-05-25/goodes-gutted-but-places-no-blame/4712772

Yep. Should should have popped straight into the world with an acute sense of race relations. From her first breath she should have known that an insult, commonly used these days to insult people, regardless of colour, for being slow-witted or brutish, had previously (and predominantly before her time) been used for racial vilification.

Definitely her age is no excuse.

/sarcasm.

Sarcasm or not, we aren’t talking about a 5 year old here.

By 13, people have a reasonable idea of what is right and wrong (unless there are other issues at play – which as far as I’m aware, there isn’t in this case).

Assuming she was attending school as she would, I’d be exceptionally surprised if she hadn’t at very least been taught about bullying, and at least been introduced to the concepts of racism.

You’re expecting a child to understanding the history of language that’s before her time. That simply isn’t appropriate for her age, and I think your expectation is unreasonable.

mcs said :

To me, a racist action isn’t defined as a racist action by the perpetrator. Its no excuse that she didn’t think it was a racial slur – quite clearly the victim took it as a racist slur, and to me that is that.

Just cause you called someone a gorilla back in the day, doesn’t mean that someone else won’t find it offensive and racist in another context.

You can’t possibly know how every person you encounter will interpret what they hear, and you shouldn’t be expected to. I think the legal concept of ‘the reasonable person’ should be applied to situations like this. Unforunately, the media have not applied that concept and what we’re left with is a case of “you’re a racist if you don’t agree with him!”. It’s ludicrous. And what you’re advocating for is a situation where entirely unreasonable conclusions can be drawn based on any criteria that suits the offended party – the polar opposite of the ‘reasonable person’ test. That’s a case of forever shifting goalposts (pardon the puns) and it seems pretty ridiculous.

And what is a “reasonable person”? A white, middle-class male who has never ever endured any racism in his entire life? It needs to be a reasonable person in the category concerned. An Indigenous man whose family and himself have experienced discrimination and racism not infrequently for most of their lives. Walk a mile in his shoes.

The law doesn’t exist for a minority – it’s there for everyone. That’s why the reasonable person is used. It’s an idea that represents a general composite of the views of the community – not the views of a specific minority. That considered, I’d say one could argue that much (if not most) of the community feels similarly to the author of this article.

Don’t get on your high horse and tell me what I should be feeling. You don’t know the colour of my skin, and you don’t know what I have and haven’t experienced. Face the fact the people are booing Goodes not because of his heritage, but because of his behaviour and his comments. If you can’t see that then there’s no helping you.

The law of racial villification does not use this reasonable man test. For good reason. Racism is contextual. The reasonable man is used in some other areas of the law.

Nilrem 9:12 pm 30 Jul 15

watto23 said :

Every Australian is tolerant until a minority speaks out about how they are treated or have been treated and then the pack turns on them making them look like they did something wrong.

If booing players who had annoyed you/done something wrong was commonplace, why aren’t all the drug cheats, domestic violence offenders etc who play sport, getting booed every round also.

No instead we get all the “I’m not a racist but” people claiming they don’t like him, but failing to provide any real facts why. If the fact he pointed out that a 13yo used a racial slur towards him was purely coincidence, then why now. Why after he has made many positive statements regarding his race do people boo him. Even the facts surrounding the incident with the 13yo girl are being contorted by those who claim the booing has nothing to do with racism.

Nothing like toleration while ever they know their place…. Its absolutely disgusting people think any other war on this issue. Even if Goodes has drawn some of this on himself (as suggested by some people who are not racists), why do we have to lower ourselves to bunch of idiots booing?

+1. Bravo dude, you nailed it

Sandman 8:17 pm 30 Jul 15

I went to the World Cup cricket final at the MCG. Every time Shane Watson did anything, the crowd would start booing. Not because of race, just because he’s known as a bit of a tosser.

Racism isn’t a one way street. I’m of the opinion that those who complain the most about racism, are the most racist. They can’t see anything other than the difference in race.

Mysteryman 5:43 pm 30 Jul 15

Nilrem said :

Mysteryman said :

mcs said :

Mysteryman said :

mcs said :

I keep hearing about him ‘bullying and shaming’ the 13 year old girl. Lets not forget the details of the incident however:
– She made what most would consider to be a clearly racist remark – and most definitely Goodes saw it that way.
– He clearly did not know at the time of pointing her out that she was 13 – he reacted to the comment from the crowd, not the person.
Yes, she was young and immature, but I don’t think that should be any excuse for ignorance.
– Goodes showed significant compassion and empathy in the aftermath, asking for support, education and empathy for the girl.
http://www.abc.net.au/news/2013-05-25/goodes-gutted-but-places-no-blame/4712772

Yep. Should should have popped straight into the world with an acute sense of race relations. From her first breath she should have known that an insult, commonly used these days to insult people, regardless of colour, for being slow-witted or brutish, had previously (and predominantly before her time) been used for racial vilification.

Definitely her age is no excuse.

/sarcasm.

Sarcasm or not, we aren’t talking about a 5 year old here.

By 13, people have a reasonable idea of what is right and wrong (unless there are other issues at play – which as far as I’m aware, there isn’t in this case).

Assuming she was attending school as she would, I’d be exceptionally surprised if she hadn’t at very least been taught about bullying, and at least been introduced to the concepts of racism.

You’re expecting a child to understanding the history of language that’s before her time. That simply isn’t appropriate for her age, and I think your expectation is unreasonable.

mcs said :

To me, a racist action isn’t defined as a racist action by the perpetrator. Its no excuse that she didn’t think it was a racial slur – quite clearly the victim took it as a racist slur, and to me that is that.

Just cause you called someone a gorilla back in the day, doesn’t mean that someone else won’t find it offensive and racist in another context.

You can’t possibly know how every person you encounter will interpret what they hear, and you shouldn’t be expected to. I think the legal concept of ‘the reasonable person’ should be applied to situations like this. Unforunately, the media have not applied that concept and what we’re left with is a case of “you’re a racist if you don’t agree with him!”. It’s ludicrous. And what you’re advocating for is a situation where entirely unreasonable conclusions can be drawn based on any criteria that suits the offended party – the polar opposite of the ‘reasonable person’ test. That’s a case of forever shifting goalposts (pardon the puns) and it seems pretty ridiculous.

And what is a “reasonable person”? A white, middle-class male who has never ever endured any racism in his entire life? It needs to be a reasonable person in the category concerned. An Indigenous man whose family and himself have experienced discrimination and racism not infrequently for most of their lives. Walk a mile in his shoes.

The law doesn’t exist for a minority – it’s there for everyone. That’s why the reasonable person is used. It’s an idea that represents a general composite of the views of the community – not the views of a specific minority. That considered, I’d say one could argue that much (if not most) of the community feels similarly to the author of this article.

Don’t get on your high horse and tell me what I should be feeling. You don’t know the colour of my skin, and you don’t know what I have and haven’t experienced. Face the fact the people are booing Goodes not because of his heritage, but because of his behaviour and his comments. If you can’t see that then there’s no helping you.

watto23 5:10 pm 30 Jul 15

Every Australian is tolerant until a minority speaks out about how they are treated or have been treated and then the pack turns on them making them look like they did something wrong.

If booing players who had annoyed you/done something wrong was commonplace, why aren’t all the drug cheats, domestic violence offenders etc who play sport, getting booed every round also.

No instead we get all the “I’m not a racist but” people claiming they don’t like him, but failing to provide any real facts why. If the fact he pointed out that a 13yo used a racial slur towards him was purely coincidence, then why now. Why after he has made many positive statements regarding his race do people boo him. Even the facts surrounding the incident with the 13yo girl are being contorted by those who claim the booing has nothing to do with racism.

Nothing like toleration while ever they know their place…. Its absolutely disgusting people think any other war on this issue. Even if Goodes has drawn some of this on himself (as suggested by some people who are not racists), why do we have to lower ourselves to bunch of idiots booing?

mcs 4:15 pm 30 Jul 15

Nilrem said :

Mysteryman said :

mcs said :

Mysteryman said :

mcs said :

I keep hearing about him ‘bullying and shaming’ the 13 year old girl. Lets not forget the details of the incident however:
– She made what most would consider to be a clearly racist remark – and most definitely Goodes saw it that way.
– He clearly did not know at the time of pointing her out that she was 13 – he reacted to the comment from the crowd, not the person.
Yes, she was young and immature, but I don’t think that should be any excuse for ignorance.
– Goodes showed significant compassion and empathy in the aftermath, asking for support, education and empathy for the girl.
http://www.abc.net.au/news/2013-05-25/goodes-gutted-but-places-no-blame/4712772

Yep. Should should have popped straight into the world with an acute sense of race relations. From her first breath she should have known that an insult, commonly used these days to insult people, regardless of colour, for being slow-witted or brutish, had previously (and predominantly before her time) been used for racial vilification.

Definitely her age is no excuse.

/sarcasm.

Sarcasm or not, we aren’t talking about a 5 year old here.

By 13, people have a reasonable idea of what is right and wrong (unless there are other issues at play – which as far as I’m aware, there isn’t in this case).

Assuming she was attending school as she would, I’d be exceptionally surprised if she hadn’t at very least been taught about bullying, and at least been introduced to the concepts of racism.

You’re expecting a child to understanding the history of language that’s before her time. That simply isn’t appropriate for her age, and I think your expectation is unreasonable.

mcs said :

To me, a racist action isn’t defined as a racist action by the perpetrator. Its no excuse that she didn’t think it was a racial slur – quite clearly the victim took it as a racist slur, and to me that is that.

Just cause you called someone a gorilla back in the day, doesn’t mean that someone else won’t find it offensive and racist in another context.

You can’t possibly know how every person you encounter will interpret what they hear, and you shouldn’t be expected to. I think the legal concept of ‘the reasonable person’ should be applied to situations like this. Unforunately, the media have not applied that concept and what we’re left with is a case of “you’re a racist if you don’t agree with him!”. It’s ludicrous. And what you’re advocating for is a situation where entirely unreasonable conclusions can be drawn based on any criteria that suits the offended party – the polar opposite of the ‘reasonable person’ test. That’s a case of forever shifting goalposts (pardon the puns) and it seems pretty ridiculous.

And what is a “reasonable person”? A white, middle-class male who has never ever endured any racism in his entire life? It needs to be a reasonable person in the category concerned. An Indigenous man whose family and himself have experienced discrimination and racism not infrequently for most of their lives. Walk a mile in his shoes.

This is a really important point – and a better way to try and express what I was trying to say in the first instance.

I’m not trying to advocate something that should be inconsistent with the idea of a reasonable person – quite clearly, at the extremes, there may be sub-optimal outcomes from such an approach. But, on that point, there aren’t that many issues in life, legal, political, whatever else, where it doesn’t get blurry at the edge – Nothing is perfect.

But I don’t accept that it isn’t reasonable, given what was said, who it was said to that he construed the comment to be racist That might not fit with the traditional ‘he should just cop it cause he’s on the footy field’ view that seems to underlie many that criticise him for those actions, but I don’t accept any part of his view on this is ‘unreasonable’ per say.

I agree the Media has gone too far – as they do on so many issues today. The real problem has been, as you’ve shown the mixing of the booing issue with the racism issue.

The only link that should have been made is that the booing in some ways is covering that undertaken by those who are doing it on a racist basis – there should never have been a booing = racist link suggested, as for the large majority that is not true. The story should be about mobilising the footy community to out the dickhead racist minority – like the two that were ejected last week at Subiaco. Instead the debate has gone a whole completely, and generally unhelpful direction instead.

What all this shows, is that racism is a very complex problem – and on that basis, Goodes should get some credit (he has his faults like we all do – which are much more exposed to scrutiny than most) for being willing to stand up, and where necessary, be outspoken on the issue, despite the reaction it has garnered and the obvious personal toll it is taking on him.

Southmouth 4:06 pm 30 Jul 15

mcs said :

Southmouth said :

Raheem Sterling got some serious booing last Friday at the MCG. I guess soccer crowds are all racist as well, oh wait, no that was just because he has been behaving badly.

Southmouth, ignoring the Raheem Sterling incident (There must have been a lot of Liverpool fans in the crowd is all I’ll say), there is a huge issue with racism in soccer crowds – isolated here in the A-League, but still a big big issue in particular in South America and Eastern Europe.

For instance, CSKA Moscow were forced to play a number of games behind closed doors because of ongoing racism from their crowds. Zenit St Petersburg is another club that has seen racism towards their own players (such as Hulk, their record transfer purchase).

I’m not sure choosing soccer as an example was too well thought through.

That is my point, sort of. Racism does exist but just because people react to someone being a knob doesn’t make them a racist or homophobe or whatever, if the target happens to be in a minority group. Only if all the members of that group are treated poorly is it bigotry etc. We should be free to call a knob a knob without that card always being played

Marcus Paul 3:59 pm 30 Jul 15

“This article is yet another example of someone rushing to express their own self-entitlement to be outraged.
Further, what is the relevance of publishing another soapbox rant here? There’s countless other avenues to read and discuss the Goodes issue, it would be nice if RA could remain a sanctuary for local issues.”

What’s up champ – afraid of someone giving their opinion – while you’re happy to give yours? Life isn’t all about pretty pictures in cafe’s is it? And if you think it is, and an issue or story like this doesn’t relate to you, maybe stick to commenting on them instead. Just a thought? 🙂

Nilrem 3:40 pm 30 Jul 15

Testfest said :

I have no idea what Adam Goodes thought he would achieve by going public with his dislike of the booing. All he has done is guarantee that it will never ever stop…

If your team is playing and you knew that some booing would throw one of the opposition players off his game, then of course you’d join in! What sort of supporter wouldn’t do their bit to help their team win the game?

Errr, a supporter that would not be prepared to do anything for a win. Like join with racists to bully a champion.

Antagonist 3:31 pm 30 Jul 15

mcs said :

Antagonist said :

nsee said :

I think this little debate about Goodes should serve as a reminder to Australians about how racist this country has always been.. until very recently (treating Indigenous Australians as part of the Floral & Fauna Act, the refusal to recognise them in the Constitution, the White Australia policy, etc etc).

It’s easy to say “move on,” that the past is the past, and all the rest, but all these blatantly racist policies were only abolished less than a generation ago. We won’t stop living in a society with racists for several more generations to come.

We only need to look at the refugee policy, which panders to the racist and super-conservative vote to see this.

Telling Adam to get over it, or to write articles childishly titled “Boo Hoo Adam” do not add to the conversation at all – it’s for the most part an attempt to cover up the reality that White Australia is still not ready to front up to the fact that racism is still alive – and that they’re just trying to conceal it.

And while aboriginal continue to rightly or wrongly have a chip on their shoulders about the past (some of them myths), the reconciliation process is dead. Perhaps the wrongs of the past are still too fresh for people to move on yet. Many wrongs continue today – most notably in NT. And to be honest, I cannot see the past being reconciled within my lifetime. And that is a great shame.

Would you have the same advice for the Jewish population of the world?

I was not handing out advice. I offered an opinion on the status quo based on personal experience that includes many years in aboriginal affairs in one capacity or another. It appears to be the insurmountable hurdle that stands in the way of true reconciliation and genuine social improvement for aboriginal and Torres Strait islander people. And, understandably, there is no ‘magic bullet’ solution.

Testfest 2:43 pm 30 Jul 15

I have no idea what Adam Goodes thought he would achieve by going public with his dislike of the booing. All he has done is guarantee that it will never ever stop…

If your team is playing and you knew that some booing would throw one of the opposition players off his game, then of course you’d join in! What sort of supporter wouldn’t do their bit to help their team win the game?

Nilrem 2:38 pm 30 Jul 15

Mysteryman said :

mcs said :

Mysteryman said :

mcs said :

I keep hearing about him ‘bullying and shaming’ the 13 year old girl. Lets not forget the details of the incident however:
– She made what most would consider to be a clearly racist remark – and most definitely Goodes saw it that way.
– He clearly did not know at the time of pointing her out that she was 13 – he reacted to the comment from the crowd, not the person.
Yes, she was young and immature, but I don’t think that should be any excuse for ignorance.
– Goodes showed significant compassion and empathy in the aftermath, asking for support, education and empathy for the girl.
http://www.abc.net.au/news/2013-05-25/goodes-gutted-but-places-no-blame/4712772

Yep. Should should have popped straight into the world with an acute sense of race relations. From her first breath she should have known that an insult, commonly used these days to insult people, regardless of colour, for being slow-witted or brutish, had previously (and predominantly before her time) been used for racial vilification.

Definitely her age is no excuse.

/sarcasm.

Sarcasm or not, we aren’t talking about a 5 year old here.

By 13, people have a reasonable idea of what is right and wrong (unless there are other issues at play – which as far as I’m aware, there isn’t in this case).

Assuming she was attending school as she would, I’d be exceptionally surprised if she hadn’t at very least been taught about bullying, and at least been introduced to the concepts of racism.

You’re expecting a child to understanding the history of language that’s before her time. That simply isn’t appropriate for her age, and I think your expectation is unreasonable.

mcs said :

To me, a racist action isn’t defined as a racist action by the perpetrator. Its no excuse that she didn’t think it was a racial slur – quite clearly the victim took it as a racist slur, and to me that is that.

Just cause you called someone a gorilla back in the day, doesn’t mean that someone else won’t find it offensive and racist in another context.

You can’t possibly know how every person you encounter will interpret what they hear, and you shouldn’t be expected to. I think the legal concept of ‘the reasonable person’ should be applied to situations like this. Unforunately, the media have not applied that concept and what we’re left with is a case of “you’re a racist if you don’t agree with him!”. It’s ludicrous. And what you’re advocating for is a situation where entirely unreasonable conclusions can be drawn based on any criteria that suits the offended party – the polar opposite of the ‘reasonable person’ test. That’s a case of forever shifting goalposts (pardon the puns) and it seems pretty ridiculous.

And what is a “reasonable person”? A white, middle-class male who has never ever endured any racism in his entire life? It needs to be a reasonable person in the category concerned. An Indigenous man whose family and himself have experienced discrimination and racism not infrequently for most of their lives. Walk a mile in his shoes.

Mysteryman 2:11 pm 30 Jul 15

mcs said :

Mysteryman said :

mcs said :

I keep hearing about him ‘bullying and shaming’ the 13 year old girl. Lets not forget the details of the incident however:
– She made what most would consider to be a clearly racist remark – and most definitely Goodes saw it that way.
– He clearly did not know at the time of pointing her out that she was 13 – he reacted to the comment from the crowd, not the person.
Yes, she was young and immature, but I don’t think that should be any excuse for ignorance.
– Goodes showed significant compassion and empathy in the aftermath, asking for support, education and empathy for the girl.
http://www.abc.net.au/news/2013-05-25/goodes-gutted-but-places-no-blame/4712772

Yep. Should should have popped straight into the world with an acute sense of race relations. From her first breath she should have known that an insult, commonly used these days to insult people, regardless of colour, for being slow-witted or brutish, had previously (and predominantly before her time) been used for racial vilification.

Definitely her age is no excuse.

/sarcasm.

Sarcasm or not, we aren’t talking about a 5 year old here.

By 13, people have a reasonable idea of what is right and wrong (unless there are other issues at play – which as far as I’m aware, there isn’t in this case).

Assuming she was attending school as she would, I’d be exceptionally surprised if she hadn’t at very least been taught about bullying, and at least been introduced to the concepts of racism.

You’re expecting a child to understanding the history of language that’s before her time. That simply isn’t appropriate for her age, and I think your expectation is unreasonable.

mcs said :

To me, a racist action isn’t defined as a racist action by the perpetrator. Its no excuse that she didn’t think it was a racial slur – quite clearly the victim took it as a racist slur, and to me that is that.

Just cause you called someone a gorilla back in the day, doesn’t mean that someone else won’t find it offensive and racist in another context.

You can’t possibly know how every person you encounter will interpret what they hear, and you shouldn’t be expected to. I think the legal concept of ‘the reasonable person’ should be applied to situations like this. Unforunately, the media have not applied that concept and what we’re left with is a case of “you’re a racist if you don’t agree with him!”. It’s ludicrous. And what you’re advocating for is a situation where entirely unreasonable conclusions can be drawn based on any criteria that suits the offended party – the polar opposite of the ‘reasonable person’ test. That’s a case of forever shifting goalposts (pardon the puns) and it seems pretty ridiculous.

mcs 1:32 pm 30 Jul 15

Southmouth said :

Raheem Sterling got some serious booing last Friday at the MCG. I guess soccer crowds are all racist as well, oh wait, no that was just because he has been behaving badly.

Southmouth, ignoring the Raheem Sterling incident (There must have been a lot of Liverpool fans in the crowd is all I’ll say), there is a huge issue with racism in soccer crowds – isolated here in the A-League, but still a big big issue in particular in South America and Eastern Europe.

For instance, CSKA Moscow were forced to play a number of games behind closed doors because of ongoing racism from their crowds. Zenit St Petersburg is another club that has seen racism towards their own players (such as Hulk, their record transfer purchase).

I’m not sure choosing soccer as an example was too well thought through.

mcs 1:29 pm 30 Jul 15

Antagonist said :

nsee said :

I think this little debate about Goodes should serve as a reminder to Australians about how racist this country has always been.. until very recently (treating Indigenous Australians as part of the Floral & Fauna Act, the refusal to recognise them in the Constitution, the White Australia policy, etc etc).

It’s easy to say “move on,” that the past is the past, and all the rest, but all these blatantly racist policies were only abolished less than a generation ago. We won’t stop living in a society with racists for several more generations to come.

We only need to look at the refugee policy, which panders to the racist and super-conservative vote to see this.

Telling Adam to get over it, or to write articles childishly titled “Boo Hoo Adam” do not add to the conversation at all – it’s for the most part an attempt to cover up the reality that White Australia is still not ready to front up to the fact that racism is still alive – and that they’re just trying to conceal it.

And while aboriginal continue to rightly or wrongly have a chip on their shoulders about the past (some of them myths), the reconciliation process is dead. Perhaps the wrongs of the past are still too fresh for people to move on yet. Many wrongs continue today – most notably in NT. And to be honest, I cannot see the past being reconciled within my lifetime. And that is a great shame.

Would you have the same advice for the Jewish population of the world?

mcs 1:27 pm 30 Jul 15

Mysteryman said :

mcs said :

I keep hearing about him ‘bullying and shaming’ the 13 year old girl. Lets not forget the details of the incident however:
– She made what most would consider to be a clearly racist remark – and most definitely Goodes saw it that way.
– He clearly did not know at the time of pointing her out that she was 13 – he reacted to the comment from the crowd, not the person.
Yes, she was young and immature, but I don’t think that should be any excuse for ignorance.
– Goodes showed significant compassion and empathy in the aftermath, asking for support, education and empathy for the girl.
http://www.abc.net.au/news/2013-05-25/goodes-gutted-but-places-no-blame/4712772

Yep. Should should have popped straight into the world with an acute sense of race relations. From her first breath she should have known that an insult, commonly used these days to insult people, regardless of colour, for being slow-witted or brutish, had previously (and predominantly before her time) been used for racial vilification.

Definitely her age is no excuse.

/sarcasm.

Sarcasm or not, we aren’t talking about a 5 year old here.

By 13, people have a reasonable idea of what is right and wrong (unless there are other issues at play – which as far as I’m aware, there isn’t in this case).

Assuming she was attending school as she would, I’d be exceptionally surprised if she hadn’t at very least been taught about bullying, and at least been introduced to the concepts of racism.

mcs 1:24 pm 30 Jul 15

mcs said :

mcs 1:23 pm 30 Jul 15
dungfungus 12:17 pm 30 Jul 15

No_Nose said :

Everyone has an opinion about it and that is fine. What I have yet to see from any side of the arguement is a workable practical solution.

In my opinion the entire blame for this untidy mess rests wholly and solely with the media. They pushed and pushed until it became a story and now they have made it too big to go away. They have created an issue that quite simply has no solution.

You simply cannot ban a crowd from ‘booing’ a particular player. You cannot ban a crowd from booing in general. You cannot restrict a crowd to only booing incidents of ‘unfair play’ or poor umpiring.

As an AFL supporter I don’t particularly like Goodes because of his style of play and more importantly because he uses that style of play to help his team beat my team. I’m sure if he played for my club I would love his style of play, because it gets the job done well. I really have no opinion about what he does or doesn’t do off-field and I don’t care. He doesn’t play for my club…so I don’t like him! But I would hate to see him end his career on this media constructed issue.

I don’t have an opinion on it but seeing how it is dividing this nation I’ll be voting NO at the forthcoming referendum.
Well done Mr. Goodes.

CBR Tweets

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