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Bus tow? No problem!

By johnboy - 21 July 2011 29

As seen in Civic this afternoon.

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bus tow

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29 Responses to
Bus tow? No problem!
Classified 8:44 am 25 Jul 11

That tow truck is not new. I suspect Action has owned it for many years, and that it is more effective for them to be able to collect a bus when they need to with their own equipment rather than using a private towing service (which may not be available when they need).

Sometimes buses break down, and if they already own the towing vehicle it makes sense to use it. I wouldn’t have thought it would cost bulk dollars to keep the tow truck running at the age it is anyway.

pandaman 1:49 am 24 Jul 11

screaming banshee said :

No, its false economy. If the buses are breaking down often enough that action were spending too much on towing contractors, the answer is not to buy your own tow truck, the answer is to address the maintenance issues.

Man, you sing a familiar tune. It goes a little something like this “If we lived in a perfect world where everyone and everything played by my perfect rules, you wouldn’t need that capability, therefore I’m keen to remove that capability in order to save a few bucks”

I totally get your viewpoint, but economic rationalism doesn’t necessarily fit best with practical reality. I’m not going to rant and argue, I’m just going to say that I for one am totally cool with the idea of Action having this capability in house.

Oh and plus, it’s a very cool and useful machine. I can think of worse things for tax dollars to be “wasted” on. For example penis shaped public art.

screaming banshee 8:36 pm 23 Jul 11

No, its false economy. If the buses are breaking down often enough that action were spending too much on towing contractors, the answer is not to buy your own tow truck, the answer is to address the maintenance issues.

ML-585 3:01 pm 23 Jul 11

screaming banshee said :

Yes, s*** breaks down and that is unavoidable, but should/does it break down often enough that it is financially justifiable to operate their own tow truck with all the compliance and expenditure that goes along with it?

So what’s the alternative? Isn’t it better to have an in-house tow truck staffed by drivers who are experienced with the ACTION fleet than to use a private heavy vehicle towing service?

Anyway, if it were more cost-efficient to outsource the towing operations they would have done so long ago.

Innovation 11:12 am 23 Jul 11

Just an idea but why bother repairing the bus? Couldn’t the truck just tow the bus along it’s route? I suppose it’s not practical because it’s higher off the ground and the elderly and infirm would have trouble getting on and off……. Perhaps they could ride up front with the tow truck driver?

screaming banshee 10:58 am 23 Jul 11

Jesus christ, you’re all missing the point. Yes, s*** breaks down and that is unavoidable, but should/does it break down often enough that it is financially justifiable to operate their own tow truck with all the compliance and expenditure that goes along with it?

KB1971 12:48 pm 22 Jul 11

screaming banshee said :

Not joking, a preventative maintenance schedule should mean any wearing parts are replaced well before a failure, and courtesy of a team of mechanics non wearing parts would be inspected regularly. With are large fleet you gain the benefit of seeing where the failure points are on the higher use units and apply that knowledge to ensuring you prevent failures in other buses.

After all these steps have failed to prevent a fault occuring, the bus must experience a fault that is not only critical to the continued operation, ie not a blown lamp/squeaky drivers seat, but also one that cannot be repaired quickly by a roadside response team….they have one right?, right??

So I ask again, how many breakdowns requiring a tow per week do they have?

Geez, you are so far off its not funny. Yep, they have a maintinence schedule to try to prevent breakdowns but how can you predict a catastrophic failure due to faulty manufacturing/poor component quality in something such as a universal joint which would disable a bus?

Maybe it had a rock hole a sump?

Also, you tell me how to predict the breakage of something like a band in an automatic transmission or an axle that has a stress fracture?

Mechanics are not able to predict all things in the future.

Mothy 11:18 am 22 Jul 11

Optimus?

Watson 7:30 am 22 Jul 11

screaming banshee said :

Not joking, a preventative maintenance schedule should mean any wearing parts are replaced well before a failure, and courtesy of a team of mechanics non wearing parts would be inspected regularly. With are large fleet you gain the benefit of seeing where the failure points are on the higher use units and apply that knowledge to ensuring you prevent failures in other buses.

After all these steps have failed to prevent a fault occuring, the bus must experience a fault that is not only critical to the continued operation, ie not a blown lamp/squeaky drivers seat, but also one that cannot be repaired quickly by a roadside response team….they have one right?, right??

So I ask again, how many breakdowns requiring a tow per week do they have?

Yeah, that’s what I get done to my car every week, just to make sure it won’t accidentally break down. It costs me my annual salary, but at least I don’t have to get NRMA membership!

Henry82 11:35 pm 21 Jul 11

screaming banshee said :

Not joking,

considering someone down there is striking every 5 minutes from lack of staff/poor conditions etc, i doubt there is much time to do “preventative maintenance”. Plus, when you repair something, things can break again. Towing can also reduce further damage, than “limping” back to the depot

screaming banshee 10:46 pm 21 Jul 11

Not joking, a preventative maintenance schedule should mean any wearing parts are replaced well before a failure, and courtesy of a team of mechanics non wearing parts would be inspected regularly. With are large fleet you gain the benefit of seeing where the failure points are on the higher use units and apply that knowledge to ensuring you prevent failures in other buses.

After all these steps have failed to prevent a fault occuring, the bus must experience a fault that is not only critical to the continued operation, ie not a blown lamp/squeaky drivers seat, but also one that cannot be repaired quickly by a roadside response team….they have one right?, right??

So I ask again, how many breakdowns requiring a tow per week do they have?

Henry82 10:12 pm 21 Jul 11

screaming banshee said :

Speaks wonders for the reliability of the action fleet that they can justify their own tow-truck, how many breakdowns requiring a tow per week do they have?

You have to be joking right? According to wiki they have 430 buses, alot of which would do over 100 hours a week.

puggy 8:53 pm 21 Jul 11

screaming banshee said :

Speaks wonders for the reliability of the action fleet that they can justify their own tow-truck, how many breakdowns requiring a tow per week do they have?

For a fleet that big, one mega tow truck is justified I think. And give them some credit, those Macks were the new shiny things when I was catching them in primary school, and they still mostly run OK. How many XF Falcons do you still see on the road for example?

screaming banshee 8:39 pm 21 Jul 11

Speaks wonders for the reliability of the action fleet that they can justify their own tow-truck, how many breakdowns requiring a tow per week do they have?

KB1971 7:43 pm 21 Jul 11

That Mack is actually some of the smaller to trucks around. There are bigger than that.

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