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Catholic secondary school in Gungahlin?

By nanzan 27 May 2009 75

Last night I attended an information night re the new Mother Teresa Catholic Primary School in Harrison.

It was mentioned that a site has also been reserved for a Catholic secondary school in Gungahlin, and I wondered if anyone knows where it actually is? Apparently, it was suggested, the site may not actually be used for a school and that another, more appropriate, site is currently being sought.

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Catholic secondary school in Gungahlin?
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deezagood 11:30 am 02 Jun 09

Ceej1973 said :

Telopea park School is recognised as one of the best in Canberra, although not private. It spans Kindy thru Yr 10 and is a feeder to Narrabundah College. Narrabundah is one of only 3 Colleges in ACT that prepares students for the International Baccalaureate , which is a requirement of many countries for entry into their Universities. So if you think that your child may want to study O.S (because you have a O.S background for e.g.), then I would seriously consider these 2 schools.

I thought Telopea was just as hard to get into as Narrabundah (especially if your child doesn’t speak French)? I would love to send my daughters there, but figured we’d never get in. Thanks for the tips Misspris – we have a few years to go yet, but I will certainly take your advice when the time comes (although schools can change significantly over a few years).

misspris 11:01 am 02 Jun 09

deezagood said :

misspris said :

deezagood said :

I agree; am losing sleep at night wondering where to send my kids. Radford is clearly the pick of the high schools, but you have to have your child’s name down from birth or you can forget it (unless you are Marcus Rudd). Narrabundah is apparently fantastic too, but only from year 11 up – and hard to get in to. So – where do I send them?

If there was a Narrabundah College Fan Club I’d be the President – that place is too fabulous for words. I just can’t say enough good things about the teachers there. My daughter did relatively well at St Clare’s but has really come into her own at ‘Bundah. The transformation in her has been nothing short of amazing really.

I have heard the same story from every single parent with kids at the Bundah; and I am crossing my fingers and toes that my kids will get in there … but apparently very hard to get into if you are out of area.

We’re way out of area (down deep south with you by the sounds of things) but still managed to get in. Get as much advice about the application as you can – that made all the difference. Attending the information night was really helpful too. They gave lots of hints about the application process.

Ceej1973 10:29 am 02 Jun 09

Telopea park School is recognised as one of the best in Canberra, although not private. It spans Kindy thru Yr 10 and is a feeder to Narrabundah College. Narrabundah is one of only 3 Colleges in ACT that prepares students for the International Baccalaureate , which is a requirement of many countries for entry into their Universities. So if you think that your child may want to study O.S (because you have a O.S background for e.g.), then I would seriously consider these 2 schools.

Ceej1973 10:16 am 02 Jun 09

bigfeet said :

fabforty said :

I assume then that there would be no objections to an Islamic school in Gungahlin.

I would certainly object to an Islamic School in my street. But then again, I would object if they re-zoned the land and allowed any school in my street, Catholic, Public, Sikh or whatever.

But as to any type of school opening in an appropriate area of my suburb, well as long as it is following the standard Territory curriculum (I assume there is one?) then go for it.

There’s an Islamic School in a suburban residential street in Yarralumla. Had friends live opposite it, and they never reported any problems.

deezagood 9:45 am 02 Jun 09

misspris said :

deezagood said :

I agree; am losing sleep at night wondering where to send my kids. Radford is clearly the pick of the high schools, but you have to have your child’s name down from birth or you can forget it (unless you are Marcus Rudd). Narrabundah is apparently fantastic too, but only from year 11 up – and hard to get in to. So – where do I send them?

If there was a Narrabundah College Fan Club I’d be the President – that place is too fabulous for words. I just can’t say enough good things about the teachers there. My daughter did relatively well at St Clare’s but has really come into her own at ‘Bundah. The transformation in her has been nothing short of amazing really.

I have heard the same story from every single parent with kids at the Bundah; and I am crossing my fingers and toes that my kids will get in there … but apparently very hard to get into if you are out of area.

misspris 8:58 am 02 Jun 09

deezagood said :

I agree; am losing sleep at night wondering where to send my kids. Radford is clearly the pick of the high schools, but you have to have your child’s name down from birth or you can forget it (unless you are Marcus Rudd). Narrabundah is apparently fantastic too, but only from year 11 up – and hard to get in to. So – where do I send them?

If there was a Narrabundah College Fan Club I’d be the President – that place is too fabulous for words. I just can’t say enough good things about the teachers there. My daughter did relatively well at St Clare’s but has really come into her own at ‘Bundah. The transformation in her has been nothing short of amazing really.

misspris 8:46 am 02 Jun 09

Jim Jones said :

In a perfect world, there’d be a Church of Satan High (based on the philosophy of Anton la Vey). The uniform would be friggin’ cool: black and red with the sigil of Baphomet prominently displayed.

Sounds like my 13 year old daughter’s dream school.

nanzan 8:39 am 02 Jun 09

Gungahlin Al said :

Gungahlin Al said :

peterh said :

Gungahlin Al said :

On schools:
We have been very happy with Harrison School to date, and the designs for the extension into years 7-10 look great. And no private school costs…

On Catholic in Gungahlin:
I haven’t specifically heard of this, but have sent an email to Andrew Barr asking him. Will advise.

al,

what is the feeder for harrison? will franklin residents be able to take their kids there?

Franklin and Harrison – it is right in the middle between the two. Not sure about Gungahlin, but assume so as it doesn’t have another school that close.

At risk of reactivating a very off topic topic, Andrew Barr didn’t know of anything specific site-wise but is asking.

Hi Al,

Thank you for that. The Director of the Catholic Education Officer definitely said (last week at the information evening for Mother Teresa Primary School in Harrison) that a site already existed for a Catholic secondary school in Gungahlin. Unfortunately, I did not get around to asking her where it is.

I am surprised, then, that the Minister does not know about it. Presumably, though, someone at the LDA or ACTPLA knows all about it.

Gungahlin Al 7:00 am 02 Jun 09

Gungahlin Al said :

peterh said :

Gungahlin Al said :

On schools:
We have been very happy with Harrison School to date, and the designs for the extension into years 7-10 look great. And no private school costs…

On Catholic in Gungahlin:
I haven’t specifically heard of this, but have sent an email to Andrew Barr asking him. Will advise.

al,

what is the feeder for harrison? will franklin residents be able to take their kids there?

Franklin and Harrison – it is right in the middle between the two. Not sure about Gungahlin, but assume so as it doesn’t have another school that close.

At risk of reactivating a very off topic topic, Andrew Barr didn’t know of anything specific site-wise but is asking.

2604 11:17 pm 29 May 09

Jim Jones said :

Most people I encountered who had stayed at Radford through years 11 and 12 and then went to University seemed to flunk out. The culture of the place (where students were constantly being told what to do and spoonfed the learning experience) saw their students remarkably unfit to deal with University: an environment in which you either use self-motivation and self-discipline rather than being spoon fed.

Jim, I went to Radford from Years 7-12 and in my experience, it didn’t work for about 20% of ppl. Like you, they resented “being told what to do” and wanted a less structured learning environment.

However, the vast majority of my classmates benefited from being in that structured environment. Like it or not, 16-17-18 year old kids (males in particular) need structure. Most of them aren’t yet ready for a university-type environment and don’t have the self-discipline it takes to force themselves to study intensively. For example, I really resented being forced to stay at school during free periods in Yr 11/12 but in hindsight it’s probably a good thing that I spent that time in the school library rather than hanging around Belconnen (what I would rather have been doing at the time!). I developed good study/work habits that are still serving me well today.

The idea that most Radford graduates go to Uni and then flunk out is certainly intriguing, too. I know a few people who started studying one thing, then stopped and changed courses, but that’s not a unique post-Radford thing at all. More a symptom of teenagers changing their minds about what interests them. I do know a lot of ex-Radford people who went on to do well studying IT, engineering, commerce and law at uni.

We’re pretty open-minded about where to send our (as yet unborn) kids to school – Ms 2604 is a high school teacher in the public system – but we’ve started saving just in case we decide to send them to Radford, too. The discipline thing, as well as the high value placed on knowledge by teachers and the kids themselves, is something that we think is valuable and worth the fees.

Mr Evil 2:59 pm 29 May 09

Fiona said :

more brainwashed children… yay.

Brainwashed, and sodomised?

Whatsup 2:47 pm 29 May 09

Granny said :

Yes, interesting! They are obviously fairly fractured as a community, but why does it work at college?

I’ll speculate.

At college many of the students have had some choice about what they want to do.
Some of the students are more mature, especially the girls.
The students that don’t want to be there will often just not turn up if they bothered to enroll in the first place.

Granny 2:28 pm 29 May 09

Yes, interesting! They are obviously fairly fractured as a community, but why does it work at college?

sepi 2:20 pm 29 May 09

IN Canberra it seems that public primary schools and colleges are fantastic, and public high schools (yrs 7-10) are pretty awful.

I dunno if that age of kids are just feral, or if something is wrong with the school system.

I personally think high schools would be nicer places if some sort of class was maintained (eg – a group of kids that all do mainstream subjects together), splitting into different groups for arts and languages.

I found that expecting teenagers to be nice to each other in a different group of 30 kids every 90 minutes all day every day just didn’t work out at all, and instead of friendships, it was more of a dog-eat-dog environment.

Kods 2:15 pm 29 May 09

Public education works.

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