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cLc to roll out to every public school

By johnboy - 26 May 2010 27

[First filed: May 25, 2010 @ 14:34]

Andrew Barr has announced that the “Connected Learning Community” (cLc), currently being trialled at eight schools (Hawker College, Lake Tuggeranong College, Stromlo High School, Alfred Deakin High School, Campbell High School, Weetangera Primary School, Ngunnawal Primary School and Wanniassa Hills Primary School) is going live to the rest of the public school system next year.

“The cLc is revolutionising teaching in ACT schools,” Minister for Education and Training Andrew Barr said today. “It will allow students to replay a lesson by podcast at home, use video links to practice speaking a language with a student at another school and have the option of completing their maths homework online. They will also be able to log in from home to double check their homework requirements and create online portfolios of work. Students will be able to learn anywhere, any time.”

The potential for parents to see for themselves what homework has been set is revolutionary enough.

The thought of every lesson being podcast is intriguing though.

Bad enough for a new teacher to lose control of a class. How much worse to have every student, those student’s friends, and families, be able to re-live the magic moments?

Any readers been involved in the trials? Want to share the experience?

UPDATE: Andrew Barr’s office has clarified that podcasting will be at the teacher’s discretion:

It’s up to the teacher what is recorded and stored The system could be useful for studetns when they’re away sick or when a lesson deals with concepts that are hard to grasp – the replay can help students better understand without having to go back to the teacher.

Cunning parents can now track teacher performance by the number of lessons published one supposes.

FURTHER UPDATE: Well we’ve had one piece of student feedback on the system which warrants front page attention:

#1
ash.wello
19:53, 25 May 10
i’m a current student at hawker college in year 12, today i watched mr barr in my library give a report on the new Connected Learning Community. i can tell you right now. nobody is interested.. about 50 percent of students at my school actually use the computers and the other half have never logged onto my classes the whole time they have been here, we just don’t care really. i’m sure parents will begin caring once it is annouced in newsletters that they can start keeping track of their children’s homework. but how many will? and what about the small percentage of people who still don’t even have a computer at home. i think we are too dependant on technology, and the minutes my fellow students and i have spent watching our teachers struggle to use the smartboards and seen machines play up have actually eaten into our learning time. don’t get me wrong, the whole catching up when your sick thing is great, but its just the same as coming back to school and collecting the worksheets you missed out on. classes before us graduated without this help so i really don’t think its needed.

What’s Your opinion?


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27 Responses to
cLc to roll out to every public school
georgesgenitals 2:58 pm 26 May 10

Woody Mann-Caruso said :

Let me guess – you were wearing warm slippers when you wrote that…?

I’ve told twice now that if you want to watch me you have to subscribe to my webcam. No more through-the-curtains freebies.

You say that now in the cold light of day.

😉

amarooresident3 2:46 pm 26 May 10

It’s another tool that students and teachers can use to do the learnin’. It won’t suit everyone, but it’s not intended to either. Not a big deal people.

Gerry-Built 2:18 pm 26 May 10

p1 said :

ash.wello said :

…and what about the small percentage of people who still don’t even have a computer at home…..[?]

That’s OK, isn’t the government providing a laptop for every student?

In the ACT (if the system ever actually works out) the laptops (notebook-type) will be provided to schools for use in classes… at least that’s what I heard…

Woody Mann-Caruso 1:16 pm 26 May 10

Let me guess – you were wearing warm slippers when you wrote that…?

I’ve told twice now that if you want to watch me you have to subscribe to my webcam. No more through-the-curtains freebies.

dvaey 1:13 pm 26 May 10

While this comment might seem slightly off-topic for this discussion, I figure its worth throwing out there. A friends kids, aged 10 and 12 recently came home talking about how theyd setup a facebook account through school ‘to keep up with their homework and their teachers’.

Now, this raises a couple of interesting questions. Firstly, who in their right mind allows 10 and 12 year-olds unfettered access to the internet (and facebook) at school. Most organisations dont even allow their staff to access these sites, but apparently schools think its appropriate to not only allow students access to these sites, but to (apparently) enter false information to get around the minimum age limit of 13 imposed by these sites. The parents of these children are hardly computer or internet savvy, so when the kids came home and told mum n dad the school setup facebook so they can do homework at home, the parents were worried but trusted in what the school had done (until I explained the issues to said parents). The parents are trying to stop their children associating with problem children from their schools and just general other nonsense that happens on facebook, but while they can control their kids access at home, they have no control over the kids use at school, which is fairly extensive.

Who within our ACT education system decided it was a good idea to get kids as young as 10, signed up to facebook, underage and without informing or even gaining parental consent. While this might be a different issue to the clc topic discussed above, I can see a link when kids get access to internet-connected computers at school for whatever reason, things like this will start to happen. How long until an ACT child is the target of a child/bestiality predator, through their school-supplied facebook profile?

The school involved in this case, is a fairly large south-canberra public school, but the kids inform us that ‘everyone is doing it’, meaning every school, not just every kid in the school.

p1 1:01 pm 26 May 10

ash.wello said :

…and what about the small percentage of people who still don’t even have a computer at home…..[?]

That’s OK, isn’t the government providing a laptop for every student?

Inappropriate 12:58 pm 26 May 10

Despite what Ash thinks, this is a good idea. It brings colleges inline with how things are done at university.

georgesgenitals 12:17 pm 26 May 10

Woody Mann-Caruso said :

– Classes before you graduated without it? My, what a forward-looking attitude you have. “Ug do fine in cave. Everybody stay in cave forever. Also, no fire, no wheel, and no alphabet. Ug heard kid down street no have wheel, and Ug just no care about writing.”

Let me guess – you were wearing warm slippers when you wrote that…?

Woody Mann-Caruso 11:58 am 26 May 10

Yes, yes – ‘the teacher’, not ‘to teacher’. Irony, meet Alanis.

Woody Mann-Caruso 11:48 am 26 May 10

If concepts are hard or they are away they need to talk to their teacher and get assistance. Life away from school isnt about logging in and catching up on what you have missed later…

WTF not? What’s easier for the student – trying to hassle to teacher for one-one-time, or just logging in and replaying the lesson as often as is necessary? I replay uni lectures – it’s the simplest way to catch up and review.

As for ash:

– You can’t be too dependent (yes, two ‘e’s, no ‘a’s for the adjective) on technology. The world already depends on it. Can’t embrace it? You’re behind. But let’s all do without because some people might not have a computer. Nothing says progress like ‘lowest common denominator’.

– Classes before you graduated without it? My, what a forward-looking attitude you have. “Ug do fine in cave. Everybody stay in cave forever. Also, no fire, no wheel, and no alphabet. Ug heard kid down street no have wheel, and Ug just no care about writing.”

– Half of students aren’t using an existing system? Let’s ignore for a moment that you can’t use that wild guesstimate to predict future behaviour on another system, and consider instead that even if half don’t, guess what? Half do. Probably the half that’ll answer ‘yes’ when you’re 28 years old and ask ‘Do you want fries with that?’

– Perhaps if you’d had this system throughout high school you’d know how to spell, know how to use punctuation, capital letters and apostrophes, understand the difference between a noun and an adjective and be able to construct a logical argument.

Monster of the Deep 10:55 am 26 May 10

I think this sort of out-of-class learning is best suited to university. High school has face to face teaching for a reason, not the least of which being the youth of the students, and I for one think it’s important 🙂

trevar 10:35 am 26 May 10

I don’t entirely disagree with ash.wello, but it’s not front-pageworthy.

Literacy levels of adult Australians are inadequate, and this is a major factor in our skills shortages, so to say that the graduation of previous classes means that this is unnecessary is shortsighted. Not all of those graduates were fully prepared for the next stage of life. Had this technology been made available previously, more of those who have graduated may have graduated with a higher skill level. There is no one-size-fits-all solution to literacy and numeracy problems, but IMHO anything that builds the capacity of parents and teachers to collaborate on education is a step in the right direction.

Ultimately, I don’t think this is a big revolution. It’s just a shifting of administration, with the possibility that teachers will come up with innovative ways of using it. And it should have been done ten years ago.

The bit that annoys me is the part in the announcement where they say “Students will be able to learn anywhere, any time”. Students have always been able to learn anywhere and anytime. And students have been learning anywhere and anytime, it’s just that teachers and parents haven’t been guiding that learning. And whether or not teachers and parents embrace this technology, students will continue to learn anytime and anywhere, just as they’ve done for the last 40,000 years. A young person left with a computer game for weeks will learn every detail about how to play the game without any teacher needing to tell them about it; Learning is human nature, and it happens naturally without any interference. Educational interference with learning is just about selecting what young people ought to learn. I think this technology could make that interference more effective.

JessP 10:19 am 26 May 10

ash.wello has a valid point. Kids need to take responsibility and listen in class. If concepts are hard or they are away they need to talk to their teacher and get assistance.

Life away from school isnt about logging in and catching up on what you have missed later….

Homework for kids is a huge issue. My son (year 8) gets homework and does it but tells me only 5 kids in his class do it and hand it in. He understands why it is important he does it (and he has motivated parents who make him do it) but he doesnt feel that it it is always ‘fair’ that he spends time at night and weekends doing it when the majority of his friends don’t. Parents do have to be parents on this issue.

housebound 8:49 am 26 May 10

Is this paving the way for the next step?
http://school-cctv.blogspot.com/2008/08/using-classroom-cctv-for-lesson-study.html
http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/uk_news/education/4268533.stm

Now that’s how a student can catch up on a missed lesson. And it will help Mr Barr and his principals decide who gets a pay rise and who gets the sack.

ash.wello 7:53 pm 25 May 10

i’m a current student at hawker college in year 12, today i watched mr barr in my library give a report on the new Connected Learning Community. i can tell you right now. nobody is interested.. about 50 percent of students at my school actually use the computers and the other half have never logged onto my classes the whole time they have been here, we just don’t care really. i’m sure parents will begin caring once it is annouced in newsletters that they can start keeping track of their children’s homework. but how many will? and what about the small percentage of people who still don’t even have a computer at home. i think we are too dependant on technology, and the minutes my fellow students and i have spent watching our teachers struggle to use the smartboards and seen machines play up have actually eaten into our learning time. don’t get me wrong, the whole catching up when your sick thing is great, but its just the same as coming back to school and collecting the worksheets you missed out on. classes before us graduated without this help so i really don’t think its needed.

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