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Cube Glassing

By johnboy - 20 June 2011 18

ACT Policing is seeking witnesses to a disturbance at the Cube Nightclub in Civic in the early hours of Sunday morning (June 19) which left two people with injuries.

Around 2.40am police received reports of a disturbance at the Cube nightclub that had left a couple of patrons with injuries.

Police attended the nightclub and found a man with injuries to his face and head. It appears the man was struck in the face with a glass or bottle. A 25-year-old woman was located in the rear of the nightclub with a stab wound to her right buttock. Police administered first aid until ambulance officers arrived. Both victims were taken to hospital for treatment.

Police are appealing for any witnesses who may have seen either assault or any person who may be able to assist with the investigation to contact Crime Stoppers on 1800 333 000, or via the Crime Stoppers website on www.act.crimestoppers.com.au.

[Courtesy ACT Policing]

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18 Responses to
Cube Glassing
Tooks 5:14 pm 20 Jun 11

Gungahlin Al said :

Tooks said :

Gungahlin Al said :

I am pleased to see that the Police have stopped using the term glassing, which as I have said here before seems to give it some form of legitimacy.

Now can RA please follow suit?

It is at the minimum assault causing grievous bodily harm, or more likely as Diggety has said attempted murder.

I don’t see how calling it ‘glassing’ gives it legitimacy.

How can it be a minimum of causing GBH? That’s simply untrue. Likewise with attempted murder.

You’ve not noticed how much more prevalent it has become? Surely it is clear that the sort of person who does this responds to the simple concept encapsulated into this name it has been given, and therefore easily recalls it in a time of heated reaction? It has been given a badge, and through that has grown in usage. It’s a join the dots thing, no?

As for the charge, if you are stabbed with a knife by someone around the face and neck, surely there is a very real chance of causing death? And therefore a realistic expectation in the eyes of a jury that no matter how drunk, the perpetrator would have to realise that to do so could/should be interpreted as an attempt to kill?

So how then is using a broken glass to do the exact same thing any different?

Perhaps have a look at some of the results, and imagine how you’d feel about being on the receiving end:
http://www.heraldsun.com.au/news/victoria/police-hunt-man-over-south-melbourne-glassing-attack/story-e6frf7kx-1225828162492
http://blogs.smh.com.au/executive-style/allmenareliars/2008/01/16/glassingtheul.html
http://au.news.yahoo.com/thewest/a/-/wa/6922663/man-jailed-over-cowardly-glassing/
http://www.thesun.co.uk/sol/homepage/news/article2254205.ece

How bad do you think it needs to be to call it “grievous”?

I’m not having a dig at you, but you don’t understand what constitutes grievous bodily harm.

‘Glassing’ is an incredibly cowardly and dangerous act, but we have adequate laws to prosecute offenders. Is it becoming more prevalent? It may be – I haven’t seen the stats though.

seanneko 4:45 pm 20 Jun 11

p1 said :

A woman stabbed in the buttocks at Cube? Really?

Yes, some women are lesbians. Amazing isn’t it.

buzz819 4:25 pm 20 Jun 11

The Frots said :

To cause GBH, it isn’t the instrument you use, it’s what the result is. GBH needs to actually break both layers of skin (dermis and epidermus) in the case of a ‘stabbing’. A black eye isn’t sufficient for GBH but may suit Actual Bodily Harm (bruising, etc).

I think you will find GBH is any injury that is lasting, ie. a scar, a bone that wont heal, nerve damage, chopping a penis off, you know, that kinda stuff.

The Frots 3:36 pm 20 Jun 11

To cause GBH, it isn’t the instrument you use, it’s what the result is. GBH needs to actually break both layers of skin (dermis and epidermus) in the case of a ‘stabbing’. A black eye isn’t sufficient for GBH but may suit Actual Bodily Harm (bruising, etc).

matt31221 2:17 pm 20 Jun 11

Gungahlin Al said :

I am pleased to see that the Police have stopped using the term glassing, which as I have said here before seems to give it some form of legitimacy.

Now can RA please follow suit?

It is at the minimum assault causing grievous bodily harm, or more likely as Diggety has said attempted murder.

What is wrong with the term “glassing”? It has a nice ring to it, especially as a threat ie – “I’m gunna glass you ****”!

In all seriousness though, haven’t bottle manufacturers started thinning the glass in the neck of the bottle so upon breaking it to use as a weapon it is less effective?? hmm.

Gungahlin Al 2:02 pm 20 Jun 11

Tooks said :

Gungahlin Al said :

I am pleased to see that the Police have stopped using the term glassing, which as I have said here before seems to give it some form of legitimacy.

Now can RA please follow suit?

It is at the minimum assault causing grievous bodily harm, or more likely as Diggety has said attempted murder.

I don’t see how calling it ‘glassing’ gives it legitimacy.

How can it be a minimum of causing GBH? That’s simply untrue. Likewise with attempted murder.

You’ve not noticed how much more prevalent it has become? Surely it is clear that the sort of person who does this responds to the simple concept encapsulated into this name it has been given, and therefore easily recalls it in a time of heated reaction? It has been given a badge, and through that has grown in usage. It’s a join the dots thing, no?

As for the charge, if you are stabbed with a knife by someone around the face and neck, surely there is a very real chance of causing death? And therefore a realistic expectation in the eyes of a jury that no matter how drunk, the perpetrator would have to realise that to do so could/should be interpreted as an attempt to kill?

So how then is using a broken glass to do the exact same thing any different?

Perhaps have a look at some of the results, and imagine how you’d feel about being on the receiving end:
http://www.heraldsun.com.au/news/victoria/police-hunt-man-over-south-melbourne-glassing-attack/story-e6frf7kx-1225828162492
http://blogs.smh.com.au/executive-style/allmenareliars/2008/01/16/glassingtheul.html
http://au.news.yahoo.com/thewest/a/-/wa/6922663/man-jailed-over-cowardly-glassing/
http://www.thesun.co.uk/sol/homepage/news/article2254205.ece

How bad do you think it needs to be to call it “grievous”?

Diggety 1:58 pm 20 Jun 11

Tooks said :

How can it be a minimum of causing GBH? That’s simply untrue. Likewise with attempted murder.

Tooks, you’re right, it isn’t the minimum yet.

The ACT, like other States have been slow to appropriately catagorise ‘glassing’.

Effectively, it is stabbing someone. If one has a knife, and stabs another in the head, they are likely to be charged with murder.

Most importantly, the message needs to be relayed to potential perpetrators: you can easily kill or permanently disfigure by ‘glassing’.

Incidents are on the rise, and it needs to be nipped in the bud, IMO.

p1 1:55 pm 20 Jun 11

Gungahlin Al said :

I am pleased to see that the Police have stopped using the term glassing, which as I have said here before seems to give it some form of legitimacy.

Now can RA please follow suit?

But the term glassing conjures up for me smasher schooner or beer bottle and a bruised face with 300 stitches across it. I can’t think of wording that JB could use which would bring such a image to my mind so quickly.

I am a fan of making “glassing” a charge similar to the use of a knife or a gun.

Tooks 1:35 pm 20 Jun 11

Gungahlin Al said :

I am pleased to see that the Police have stopped using the term glassing, which as I have said here before seems to give it some form of legitimacy.

Now can RA please follow suit?

It is at the minimum assault causing grievous bodily harm, or more likely as Diggety has said attempted murder.

I don’t see how calling it ‘glassing’ gives it legitimacy.

How can it be a minimum of causing GBH? That’s simply untrue. Likewise with attempted murder.

buzz819 1:03 pm 20 Jun 11

Gungahlin Al said :

I am pleased to see that the Police have stopped using the term glassing, which as I have said here before seems to give it some form of legitimacy.

Now can RA please follow suit?

It is at the minimum assault causing grievous bodily harm, or more likely as Diggety has said attempted murder.

When you start your own online forum you can call it what you want.

johnboy 12:50 pm 20 Jun 11

Gungahlin Al said :

I am pleased to see that the Police have stopped using the term glassing, which as I have said here before seems to give it some form of legitimacy.

Now can RA please follow suit?

It is at the minimum assault causing grievous bodily harm, or more likely as Diggety has said attempted murder.

No.

Gungahlin Al 12:46 pm 20 Jun 11

I am pleased to see that the Police have stopped using the term glassing, which as I have said here before seems to give it some form of legitimacy.

Now can RA please follow suit?

It is at the minimum assault causing grievous bodily harm, or more likely as Diggety has said attempted murder.

The Frots 12:42 pm 20 Jun 11

Diggety said :

FFS.

Please Canberra, don’t go down the path of Gold Coast thuggery!

Glassing (in the head/neck) is a whisker off attempted murder. The injuries are often horrendous and have ended in deaths.

It is a disgusting practice and, personally, I don’t think the ACT judiciary have the arm strength to throw a book hard enough at offenders.

Yeah to this – +1.

It’s getting far too much.

Diggety 10:47 am 20 Jun 11

FFS.

Please Canberra, don’t go down the path of Gold Coast thuggery!

Glassing (in the head/neck) is a whisker off attempted murder. The injuries are often horrendous and have ended in deaths.

It is a disgusting practice and, personally, I don’t think the ACT judiciary have the arm strength to throw a book hard enough at offenders.

p1 10:43 am 20 Jun 11

A woman stabbed in the buttocks at Cube? Really?

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