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Death on the Parkway

johnboy 6 May 2011 42

ACT Policing is investigating a collision on the Tuggeranong Parkway in Weston tonight (Thursday, May 5) around 7pm in which an elderly male driver was deceased.

Investigators are examining the circumstances surrounding the collision, which occurred after a northbound Kia Cerato sedan driven by the deceased man, an 86-year-old from Page, has lost control and collided with the concrete divider in the centre of the road before being struck from behind by another vehicle, a Mazda sedan.

Attempts were made to resuscitate the elderly man but he later died at the scene. He was the sole occupant of the Kia sedan. The two people in the Mazda sedan were conveyed to hospital but their injuries were not considered serious.

While police are noting this as the seventh fatality on Canberra’s roads this year, investigations are ongoing as to whether the victim had died as a result of a medical condition. A determination as to whether this was a road fatality or the result of a medical condition will be made following a post mortem examination.

The Collision Investigation and Reconstruction Team is requesting that any witnesses to the incident who have not yet spoken with police should contact Crime Stoppers on 1800 333 000, or via the Crime Stoppers website on www.act.crimestoppers.com.au.

[Courtesy ACT Policing]


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WonderfulWorld WonderfulWorld 11:33 pm 21 May 11

I drove past this accident on the otherside of the parkway and wondered what had happened saying my prayers as looked bad.

So thanks RA for keeping us in the know.

As for the comments, why do RAs always sway from the issue of an accident to “spellos”. This is not the place for one up man ship of the best public servant that ever livedand they can not spell at the best of times!

To be honest I do not come to this site as often as I used to because the topics comments ALWAYS steer from the reason they are posted.

Please keep the conversations in line with the topics as it is just completely distracting from the story.

dvaey dvaey 10:29 am 09 May 11

Innovation said :

What do you suggest should be done to fix all of these terrible practices? Do you think that we should pay more taxes to skill up and/or replace, to your standards, all of the offending civilians and police working in the AFP?

Maybe of the miriad of new staff you employ, find the best writers and english scores of the applicants rather than just throwing whoever wherever theres a spot. You dont have someone who cant draw, take the role of a sketchmaker, why have someone who cant write take the role of a media writer? You dont necessarily have to increase the skills, you just have to find those who already have them and put them in the best roles to begin with.

Innovation Innovation 10:00 am 09 May 11

Breda – Perhaps you do have a point although I can’t see it. What do you suggest should be done to fix all of these terrible practices? Do you think that we should pay more taxes to skill up and/or replace, to your standards, all of the offending civilians and police working in the AFP? Alternatively, should the AFP be diverting police resources to these poorly performing areas? How would you go about implementing the changes that you think are necessary?

Spideydog Spideydog 9:32 am 09 May 11

breda said :

As for the statistics about prosecutions, it is not about the ones that get to court. It is about the ones that never get to court because the prosecutors look at the material that has been provided by ACT Policing and say – ‘you have got to be kidding. No way can this support a successful prosecution.’

Good try at twisting your way out of that one ……. Then I presume you have the stats for those prosecutions that DPP veto and why they were veto’d? Your correlation between Police media releases and prosecutions is a moot point.

breda breda 8:45 pm 08 May 11

I have consistently made it clear that I understand that the people who prepare material for prosecutors are not the same people who scrawl these amateurish press releases. The argument that they are on tight deadlines is a joke – being a professional writer (in whatever field) means that you have to produce high quality written output quickly. That is the skill that defines a professional writer.

As for the statistics about prosecutions, it is not about the ones that get to court. It is about the ones that never get to court because the prosecutors look at the material that has been provided by ACT Policing and say – ‘you have got to be kidding. No way can this support a successful prosecution.’

Spideydog Spideydog 5:17 pm 08 May 11

dvaey said :

Spideydog said :

If a medical reason is the cause of a collision, how is that reasonably expected to be added to a road toll ?? How is the Government, police etc expected to prevent a person having a heart attack or other medical ailment ???

Speed cameras, of course, the same way theyre going to prevent all other speed related deaths. Wait for it, they’ll blame the second car for travelling at 105km/hr on the parkway and it was entirely the speeding drivers fault, whether or not there was a car stopped in the ‘fast lane’ of an arterial road or not.

You have absolutely NO idea of how or what caused this collision but making wild accusations ….. Again with the conspiracy theories.

Innovation Innovation 2:12 pm 08 May 11

Breda – as well as missing the point that has been repeatedly raised by others in this thread the fundamental message that I got from the media release was that, sadly, someone died on the Parkway.

Deadlines aside, perhaps the media release could have contained better spelling, grammar and structure particularly if the writer was better skilled/qualified and therefore paid more. Presumably though people with those skills are getting better paid in other jobs – maybe even doing the sort of work that you are possibly doing. Alternatively, are you suggesting that better skilled people such as yourself should provide some sort of social service by working in these types of lower paid positions?

Tooks Tooks 1:48 pm 08 May 11

Spideydog said :

breda said :

In the example I commented on above, there were two substantive points which were incorrect – contradictory information on when the man died, and stating (through atrocious grammar) that it was the car, not the driver, that lost control. If that kind of imprecision litters the briefs provided by ACT Policing to prosecutors, no wonder they have trouble getting convictions.

Can you please quote the amount of briefs that go without conviction as opposed to gaining conviction …… if you are quoting an apparent “trouble to get convictions” then you must have the current apparent failure rate?

No, I’m betting he or she can’t, but I will.

2009-2010: Percentage of cases finalised by offence proven in Court – 85.9% (target 80%+)

If police and DPP are having trouble getting convictions, then why are they comfortably beating their target, the AMC is nearly full, and Bimberi is nearly full?

Spideydog Spideydog 11:41 am 08 May 11

Spideydog said :

breda said :

In the example I commented on above, there were two substantive points which were incorrect – contradictory information on when the man died, and stating (through atrocious grammar) that it was the car, not the driver, that lost control. If that kind of imprecision litters the briefs provided by ACT Policing to prosecutors, no wonder they have trouble getting convictions.

Can you please quote the amount of briefs that go without conviction as opposed to gaining conviction …… if you are quoting an apparent “trouble to get convictions” then you must have the current apparent failure rate?

Breda, you still haven’t answered the above question …….

You do realise that Police media are totally different to operational Police preparing and submitting briefs …… As numerous people have pointed out, your commenting on something you have no knowledge about.

dvaey dvaey 11:34 am 08 May 11

Spideydog said :

If a medical reason is the cause of a collision, how is that reasonably expected to be added to a road toll ?? How is the Government, police etc expected to prevent a person having a heart attack or other medical ailment ???

Speed cameras, of course, the same way theyre going to prevent all other speed related deaths. Wait for it, they’ll blame the second car for travelling at 105km/hr on the parkway and it was entirely the speeding drivers fault, whether or not there was a car stopped in the ‘fast lane’ of an arterial road or not.

el el 10:39 am 08 May 11

breda said :

I reiterate that if they can’t even put out a short press release about a fairly straightforward car accident without significant errors and ambiguities, what must their briefs about more complex matters look like? If the senior hierarchy regards this consistently unprofessional output as acceptable, what is the standard required of those who don’t get paid to write for a living?

One has to wonder what merit standards are applied in the ACT Policing unit that issues these releases. One further has to wonder whether those who overlook or don’t notice these things are also overlooking or not noticing very poor written skills in other areas, such as briefs for prosecutors.

Except the pubic servants in the media team won’t be writing briefs ‘about more complex matters’ or preparing documents for the DPP?

CanberraGirl19 CanberraGirl19 9:36 am 08 May 11

breda said :

Well, spello’s (sic) are the least of it. As I said before, comparisons with other media outlets are irrelevant – although few, if any, are as consistently illiterate as ACT Policing’s press releases.

I reiterate that if they can’t even put out a short press release about a fairly straightforward car accident without significant errors and ambiguities, what must their briefs about more complex matters look like? If the senior hierarchy regards this consistently unprofessional output as acceptable, what is the standard required of those who don’t get paid to write for a living?

One has to wonder what merit standards are applied in the ACT Policing unit that issues these releases. One further has to wonder whether those who overlook or don’t notice these things are also overlooking or not noticing very poor written skills in other areas, such as briefs for prosecutors.

Why do you insist on stating the same points over and over? As has already been pointed out to you, these media releases are probably rushed through to meet a deadline, and as such probably don’t get proof read a lot. Also, the people that write these releases are not the same people that write briefs, and they’d have a lot more time to proof read the briefs before they are handed to the prosecution.

Sounds to me like someone just doesn’t like the ACT Police.

buzz819 buzz819 8:16 am 08 May 11

breda said :

Well, spello’s (sic) are the least of it. As I said before, comparisons with other media outlets are irrelevant – although few, if any, are as consistently illiterate as ACT Policing’s press releases.

I reiterate that if they can’t even put out a short press release about a fairly straightforward car accident without significant errors and ambiguities, what must their briefs about more complex matters look like? If the senior hierarchy regards this consistently unprofessional output as acceptable, what is the standard required of those who don’t get paid to write for a living?

One has to wonder what merit standards are applied in the ACT Policing unit that issues these releases. One further has to wonder whether those who overlook or don’t notice these things are also overlooking or not noticing very poor written skills in other areas, such as briefs for prosecutors.

Hmm.. You do realise you don’t know what your talking about?

breda breda 2:44 am 08 May 11

Well, spello’s (sic) are the least of it. As I said before, comparisons with other media outlets are irrelevant – although few, if any, are as consistently illiterate as ACT Policing’s press releases.

I reiterate that if they can’t even put out a short press release about a fairly straightforward car accident without significant errors and ambiguities, what must their briefs about more complex matters look like? If the senior hierarchy regards this consistently unprofessional output as acceptable, what is the standard required of those who don’t get paid to write for a living?

One has to wonder what merit standards are applied in the ACT Policing unit that issues these releases. One further has to wonder whether those who overlook or don’t notice these things are also overlooking or not noticing very poor written skills in other areas, such as briefs for prosecutors.

Tooks Tooks 7:09 pm 07 May 11

In the example I commented on above, there were two substantive points which were incorrect – contradictory information on when the man died, and stating (through atrocious grammar) that it was the car, not the driver, that lost control. If that kind of imprecision litters the briefs provided by ACT Policing to prosecutors, no wonder they have trouble getting convictions.

Despite the pompous and arrogant tone of your comments, I agree with you about the obvious mistakes, and to be quite honest, I often find the basic errors in their media releases absolutely cringe worthy. However, my point was that the media team have nothing to do with Court briefs and to assume that ‘that kind of imprecision’ litters briefs, is incorrect. Briefs, unlike these media releases, go through several sets of hands (and eyes) before even landing on the desk of the DPP, so such errors are generally weeded out. I suspect some of these media releases are rushed through to meet certain deadlines and as such, are not proofread to any great extent.

In most organisations, the people who produce material for the public to read are experts at written communication – much more so than those who perform other tasks. If the hierarchy at ACT Policing think that their press people are of an acceptable standard, it seems likely that they wouldn’t have much aptitude or skill for critically evaluating written material generated elsewhere in the organisation.

The police who are vetting briefs have nothing to do with vetting media releases. You’re making some big assumptions based on very little knowledge of the organisation.

Spideydog Spideydog 6:01 pm 07 May 11

breda said :

In the example I commented on above, there were two substantive points which were incorrect – contradictory information on when the man died, and stating (through atrocious grammar) that it was the car, not the driver, that lost control. If that kind of imprecision litters the briefs provided by ACT Policing to prosecutors, no wonder they have trouble getting convictions.

Can you please quote the amount of briefs that go without conviction as opposed to gaining conviction …… if you are quoting an apparent “trouble to get convictions” then you must have the current apparent failure rate?

Spideydog Spideydog 5:53 pm 07 May 11

breda said :

What has the poor quality of media releases got to do with briefs? Serious comment, or are you trying to get a bite?
——————————————————————————————–
It’s a very serious comment, and the point is probably more significant than the embarrassingly illiterate press releases routinely issued by ACT Policing.

In the example I commented on above, there were two substantive points which were incorrect – contradictory information on when the man died, and stating (through atrocious grammar) that it was the car, not the driver, that lost control. If that kind of imprecision litters the briefs provided by ACT Policing to prosecutors, no wonder they have trouble getting convictions.

In most organisations, the people who produce material for the public to read are experts at written communication – much more so than those who perform other tasks. If the hierarchy at ACT Policing think that their press people are of an acceptable standard, it seems likely that they wouldn’t have much aptitude or skill for critically evaluating written material generated elsewhere in the organisation.

Are u serious …….. seriously, supposed spello’s and incorrect english which the commercial and “professionals” cant get right even though they have multi tiered editors !!!!! Will you jump onto the ninemsn site and praise them with the same amount of praise, or ABC, SBS, TEN or who ever?

If a medical reason is the cause of a collision, how is that reasonably expected to be added to a road toll ?? How is the Government, police etc expected to prevent a person having a heart attack or other medical ailment ???

So many complainers and sooks over trivial crap ……. some people really need to grow up and look at the bigger picture than their apparent ego’s

breda breda 3:20 pm 07 May 11

What has the poor quality of media releases got to do with briefs? Serious comment, or are you trying to get a bite?
——————————————————————————————–
It’s a very serious comment, and the point is probably more significant than the embarrassingly illiterate press releases routinely issued by ACT Policing.

In the example I commented on above, there were two substantive points which were incorrect – contradictory information on when the man died, and stating (through atrocious grammar) that it was the car, not the driver, that lost control. If that kind of imprecision litters the briefs provided by ACT Policing to prosecutors, no wonder they have trouble getting convictions.

In most organisations, the people who produce material for the public to read are experts at written communication – much more so than those who perform other tasks. If the hierarchy at ACT Policing think that their press people are of an acceptable standard, it seems likely that they wouldn’t have much aptitude or skill for critically evaluating written material generated elsewhere in the organisation.

Tooks Tooks 1:50 pm 07 May 11

breda said :

buzz819, when the best you can come up with is personal attacks and irrelevant comparisons with other media outlets (none of which is remotely as bad as ACT Policing, except perhaps ABC Online), real argument is obviously thin on the ground.

ABC Online gets a special mention because the ABC pretends to be an arbiter of high quality journalism. This week’s winner was a headline that said that the “State Parliament” of the Northern Territory did something. I mean, really, even Crikey usually does better than that.

As Fairfax are apparently about to get rid of their sub-editors, ACT Policing would be well advised to snap a few of them up (presuming that someone’s partner or relative is not next in line) to fix up their sub-literate media releases, and perhaps cast an eye over their briefs to prosecutors as well.

What has the poor quality of media releases got to do with briefs? Serious comment, or are you trying to get a bite?

breda breda 1:37 pm 07 May 11

buzz819, when the best you can come up with is personal attacks and irrelevant comparisons with other media outlets (none of which is remotely as bad as ACT Policing, except perhaps ABC Online), real argument is obviously thin on the ground.

ABC Online gets a special mention because the ABC pretends to be an arbiter of high quality journalism. This week’s winner was a headline that said that the “State Parliament” of the Northern Territory did something. I mean, really, even Crikey usually does better than that.

As Fairfax are apparently about to get rid of their sub-editors, ACT Policing would be well advised to snap a few of them up (presuming that someone’s partner or relative is not next in line) to fix up their sub-literate media releases, and perhaps cast an eye over their briefs to prosecutors as well.

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