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Distressed puppy next door

By canberralyf 15 October 2015 25

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I am seeking any information anyone may be able to give me about what I can do about a distressed little puppy next door.

Over the weekend, my neighbours appear to have gotten a beautiful new puppy; however, the last two days the people living in the house have all left in the morning and not returned until 6ish in the evening. They appear to have left the poor little guy all by himself, in a cornered off part of their yard, and all he has done is bark and cry for attention. A few times I’ve popped my head over the fence to see if its okay but he looks physically distressed. My own dog is also becoming distressed as all he can hear is the puppy crying as well.

I would just like to know what I may be able to do in regards to this, I don’t socialise with these neighbours as they are very private people but I really don’t like the idea of this puppy crying all day — I’m concerned for its welfare. I’d even be happy for it to play with my dog while they are gone but I can’t just go into their yard and take it. What can I do?

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Distressed puppy next door
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Quincy 3:06 pm 25 Oct 15

I’d love to get a demographic analysis of these comments. Despite having raised children, I thought it was ok to leave a new puppy at home alone all day until we got one, fortunately while I was working part-time, and I came home at lunchtime to find him crying in the yard after just three hours. Many people who think that leaving dogs alone for 8+ hours every day is ok seem not to spend enough time at home (for whatever reason, including good reasons) to know this. We receive many compliments on our dog’s behaviour because we have invested a lot of time & attention in him.

dungfungus 7:21 pm 22 Oct 15

ana said :

This is a difficult situation as the pup is obviously very distressed. The owners are out all day and cannot do much about it really, and there are examples of this all over the suburbs.

The sad thing for the pup and all the other neighbours is that it will grow into a perpetually barking dog who once starts barking in the morning, will probably not know how to stop until it falls asleep exhausted and then wakes up and gets distressed all over again and barks until someone comes home.

Be careful approaching the neighbours as some people don’t like having this sort of thing pointed out to them. Maybe just friendly like, say ‘I see you have a new puppy’, and if they don’;t ask if it has been misbehaving, you’ll know that they are the type of people who shouldn’t be owning a dog.

Perpetually barking dogs have disappeared in the night in my neighbourhood.

ungruntled 6:31 pm 22 Oct 15

Ana, that was such a very helpful comment.
Be afraid of your neighbours.
Assume they may be really not nice before you talk to them.
Look for them to regard the dog’s distress as misbehaviour.
Classify thiem as “the type of people” how shouldn’ own a dog.
Not too much you’ve missed there !

madelini 6:07 pm 22 Oct 15

canberralyf said :

Grimm said :

MYOB?

If it has food, water and shade, it is just a puppy being a puppy in an unfamiliar environment after being separated from its mother. It will get over it in a few days. Unfortunately not everybody can take time off work for however long it takes for a puppy to adjust.

Wow, I don’t think you could be anymore unhelpful, MYOB really??

For one it is loudly barking and crying so even if I wanted to mind my own business its cries are distracting. Secondly, puppies need to socialise especially when they are that young, even more so in the week after they are taken away from their mothers and siblings.

I agree they need to adjust to their new surrounds but neglect is not adjustment, if you can’t accept the fact your life may differ slightly for a few weeks after getting a puppy don’t get one, its pretty bloody simple.

Thank you for all the other replies though, it looks like talking to them will have to be my best bet.

I think MYOB is the right answer. You’re going to come across as rude if you assume to have a greater knowledge of their pet than they do, especially if you don’t usually interact with them.

Puppies always cry for the first few weeks. Then it will grow up and adjust. They all do. They don’t have to “socialise” or have neighbours throw in their two cents. Puppies are really quite resilient. Unless you think it is actual neglect or cruelty – ie. They are not caring for their pet when they’re at home, then it’s none of your business.

jack 4:48 pm 22 Oct 15

Just wondering how did you deal with this in the end?
Ps…I have multiple dogs and would not have been offended had you knocked on my door, very kind of you! Sadly some people can misinterpret kindness.

ana 3:21 pm 22 Oct 15

This is a difficult situation as the pup is obviously very distressed. The owners are out all day and cannot do much about it really, and there are examples of this all over the suburbs.

The sad thing for the pup and all the other neighbours is that it will grow into a perpetually barking dog who once starts barking in the morning, will probably not know how to stop until it falls asleep exhausted and then wakes up and gets distressed all over again and barks until someone comes home.

Be careful approaching the neighbours as some people don’t like having this sort of thing pointed out to them. Maybe just friendly like, say ‘I see you have a new puppy’, and if they don’;t ask if it has been misbehaving, you’ll know that they are the type of people who shouldn’t be owning a dog.

Wendeborg 3:16 pm 22 Oct 15

I agree with those who suggested you talk to your neighbours and ask if you can help. That’s what I’d do!

ungruntled 11:44 pm 20 Oct 15

Just thinking about this situation.

Poor little thing is probably having separation anxiety. Very unpleasant for it & you, however, maybe if when you talk to the owners about the puppy’s fretting, they may be happy to let you visit with it to break up it’s day a bit while it is settling in.

Can also suggest to them that if it gets a walk in the morning, it may sleep for some of the time its “parents” are away. That may also help.

A good bone often helps to keep them busy for some time too.

If you think the animal is being mistreated in some way, that is a different situation. Talk to RSPCA & don’t muck about.

Otherwise, just be the best neighbour you can. The puppy will settle & it’s really hard for everyone when there is a new addition to any household. Good luck to you all.

jared 8:04 pm 20 Oct 15

Yeah right. “the dog will get over it” my a*$e. I’ve got a neighbour over my back fence with 2 dogs over the age of 10. They respond to being left in the backyard by barking all day long, non-stop, until the owner gets home. The solution is to a) contact your neighbours (in person – notes get you nowhere) and let them know that the dog is whining/barking all day and suggest they quieten it down and if you get no joy b) contact TAMS and complain. Some people are responsible and keep their barking/whining dogs inside when they are out, others don’t and respond with “it’s not my dog, it doesn’t bark at all when i’m home” and refuse to do anything.
As for the “mind your own business…it’s not illegal”…well actually it is illegal. According to the Domestic Animal Act if your dog causes “excessive disturbance to a person other than the keeper because
of noise” you’re liable to fines and eventually court action.

It’s bizarre that people treat dog noise like some kind of ‘special’ noise that isn’t annoying and doesn’t interrupt the peace and quiet to which you are reasonably entitled. If someone was standing over the fence crying, screaming and swearing intermittently all day long would your response be to do nothing/mind your own business?

Skuz 12:07 pm 20 Oct 15

I think Grimm has got it right. If the puppy has food, water and shade it is not distressed, it is a puppy adjusting to it owners going to work. It’ll be right in a few days. I think the response you received on here is an indication of how your neighbors will react.

If it is actually distressed, no water, chained in the sun. Get on to the RSPCA.

london 12:46 pm 18 Oct 15

Grimm obviously has little regard for other people living around him/her or wouldn’t even think MYOB.
Why should someone have to listen to anyone making unresonable noise all day even if it is a poor dog.
It’s amazing how many people in Canberra own dogs when they have tiny yards and work all day.
Only in Canberra! If you lived in NSW you could speak to the local council but here no one is interested.
You could try the rangers but don’t hold your breath waiting for them to act.

Alexandra Craig 10:59 am 16 Oct 15

Grimm said :

Masquara said :

Grimm said :

Or maybe I have more than a little experience in handling and training dogs and understand their behaviour quite well? This whole thing about “needing to socialise” is simply emotive and far from correct.

I’ve seen chain-mad dogs on farms – and I assure you you’re wrong.

There’s a bit of a difference between chained up and isolated/ignored dogs and a puppy pining for its mother the first few days away from her. They do not need constant attention. Spending the day alone in the back yard while the owners are at work is not detrimental to it at all.

Just waiting on somebody to suggest an animal psychologist for this traumatic event now.

As I said, if the dog has food, water and shade, it is fine. What it is doing is normal behaviour for a puppy recently separated from its mother and siblings. Turning up on your neighbours doorstep, implying they are neglecting their animal by going to work, is not exactly a great way to introduce yourself.

I don’t think they’re implying neglect. All they’ve been suggested to do is go next door, introduce themselves, and offer to look after their dog while they’re out. Honestly, if I was the dog owner and someone nice was willing to babysit my dog for free and keep him busy etc I would be extremely happy with their kind offer.

Grimm 9:02 am 16 Oct 15

Masquara said :

Grimm said :

Or maybe I have more than a little experience in handling and training dogs and understand their behaviour quite well? This whole thing about “needing to socialise” is simply emotive and far from correct.

I’ve seen chain-mad dogs on farms – and I assure you you’re wrong.

There’s a bit of a difference between chained up and isolated/ignored dogs and a puppy pining for its mother the first few days away from her. They do not need constant attention. Spending the day alone in the back yard while the owners are at work is not detrimental to it at all.

Just waiting on somebody to suggest an animal psychologist for this traumatic event now.

As I said, if the dog has food, water and shade, it is fine. What it is doing is normal behaviour for a puppy recently separated from its mother and siblings. Turning up on your neighbours doorstep, implying they are neglecting their animal by going to work, is not exactly a great way to introduce yourself.

Masquara 8:24 pm 15 Oct 15

Grimm said :

Or maybe I have more than a little experience in handling and training dogs and understand their behaviour quite well? This whole thing about “needing to socialise” is simply emotive and far from correct.

I’ve seen chain-mad dogs on farms – and I assure you you’re wrong.

Masquara 6:35 pm 15 Oct 15

canberralyf said :

henryans said :

Maybe mind your own business for a start.
They aren’t mistreating it, aren’t doing anything illegal so leave your neighbors alone, sheesh people these days just itching to tell others how to live!
Sounds like you have lots of time on your hands, head over to
http://www.volunteeringaustralia.org/

I honestly cannot Believe I am being personally victimized for being concerned about the welfare of a puppy. Only on the #riotact.

Leaving a puppy on its own all day, distressed, is definitely not OK. Have you checked with the RSPCA? Go with their advice on what to do … if you don’t feel like having a chat to them yourself …

Tooks 5:49 pm 15 Oct 15

Grimm said :

canberralyf said :

Grimm said :

MYOB?

If it has food, water and shade, it is just a puppy being a puppy in an unfamiliar environment after being separated from its mother. It will get over it in a few days. Unfortunately not everybody can take time off work for however long it takes for a puppy to adjust.

Wow, I don’t think you could be anymore unhelpful, MYOB really??

For one it is loudly barking and crying so even if I wanted to mind my own business its cries are distracting. Secondly, puppies need to socialise especially when they are that young, even more so in the week after they are taken away from their mothers and siblings.

I agree they need to adjust to their new surrounds but neglect is not adjustment, if you can’t accept the fact your life may differ slightly for a few weeks after getting a puppy don’t get one, its pretty bloody simple.

Thank you for all the other replies though, it looks like talking to them will have to be my best bet.

Or maybe I have more than a little experience in handling and training dogs and understand their behaviour quite well? This whole thing about “needing to socialise” is simply emotive and far from correct.

You’re experienced at handling and training dogs but you reckon they don’t need socialisation? You couldn’t be more wrong.

Puppies should be socialised as much as possible before their first fear period (usually about the 12 week mark). Where people go wrong is in their understanding of socialisation when referring to puppies.

Knock on your neighbour’s door and have a chat with them about it.

Alexandra Craig 5:18 pm 15 Oct 15

canberralyf said :

henryans said :

Maybe mind your own business for a start.
They aren’t mistreating it, aren’t doing anything illegal so leave your neighbors alone, sheesh people these days just itching to tell others how to live!
Sounds like you have lots of time on your hands, head over to
http://www.volunteeringaustralia.org/

I honestly cannot Believe I am being personally victimized for being concerned about the welfare of a puppy. Only on the #riotact.

Sorry about the rude comments you’re getting back. I can only imagine that if you weren’t to do anything and then the situation occured where something bad happened to the dog people would then ask you why you didn’t do anything sooner.

Good luck with your chat to the neighbours. I’m sure if you are friendly and polite they will appreciate your concern 🙂 Good on you for caring about animals.

canberralyf 4:57 pm 15 Oct 15

henryans said :

Maybe mind your own business for a start.
They aren’t mistreating it, aren’t doing anything illegal so leave your neighbors alone, sheesh people these days just itching to tell others how to live!
Sounds like you have lots of time on your hands, head over to
http://www.volunteeringaustralia.org/

I honestly cannot Believe I am being personally victimized for being concerned about the welfare of a puppy. Only on the #riotact.

henryans 4:13 pm 15 Oct 15

Maybe mind your own business for a start.
They aren’t mistreating it, aren’t doing anything illegal so leave your neighbors alone, sheesh people these days just itching to tell others how to live!
Sounds like you have lots of time on your hands, head over to
http://www.volunteeringaustralia.org/

FrankReynolds 3:36 pm 15 Oct 15

I agree with much of the above. It’s worth just heading over and having a chat to your neighbours. We had a similar situation with one of our neighbours. They would leave very early in the morning and the dog would whine outside, waking us up.
I had a chat to them and to their credit, they addressed the issue. They were unaware that it was still an issue (it only whines when they aren’t home). I’m not sure what they did to sort it out, whether they leave to dog inside or otherwise, but different dogs will need different training. If it’s a new puppy it might just take a little while to settle in.

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