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Distressed puppy next door

By canberralyf - 15 October 2015 25

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I am seeking any information anyone may be able to give me about what I can do about a distressed little puppy next door.

Over the weekend, my neighbours appear to have gotten a beautiful new puppy; however, the last two days the people living in the house have all left in the morning and not returned until 6ish in the evening. They appear to have left the poor little guy all by himself, in a cornered off part of their yard, and all he has done is bark and cry for attention. A few times I’ve popped my head over the fence to see if its okay but he looks physically distressed. My own dog is also becoming distressed as all he can hear is the puppy crying as well.

I would just like to know what I may be able to do in regards to this, I don’t socialise with these neighbours as they are very private people but I really don’t like the idea of this puppy crying all day — I’m concerned for its welfare. I’d even be happy for it to play with my dog while they are gone but I can’t just go into their yard and take it. What can I do?

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25 Responses to
Distressed puppy next door
london 12:46 pm 18 Oct 15

Grimm obviously has little regard for other people living around him/her or wouldn’t even think MYOB.
Why should someone have to listen to anyone making unresonable noise all day even if it is a poor dog.
It’s amazing how many people in Canberra own dogs when they have tiny yards and work all day.
Only in Canberra! If you lived in NSW you could speak to the local council but here no one is interested.
You could try the rangers but don’t hold your breath waiting for them to act.

Alexandra Craig 10:59 am 16 Oct 15

Grimm said :

Masquara said :

Grimm said :

Or maybe I have more than a little experience in handling and training dogs and understand their behaviour quite well? This whole thing about “needing to socialise” is simply emotive and far from correct.

I’ve seen chain-mad dogs on farms – and I assure you you’re wrong.

There’s a bit of a difference between chained up and isolated/ignored dogs and a puppy pining for its mother the first few days away from her. They do not need constant attention. Spending the day alone in the back yard while the owners are at work is not detrimental to it at all.

Just waiting on somebody to suggest an animal psychologist for this traumatic event now.

As I said, if the dog has food, water and shade, it is fine. What it is doing is normal behaviour for a puppy recently separated from its mother and siblings. Turning up on your neighbours doorstep, implying they are neglecting their animal by going to work, is not exactly a great way to introduce yourself.

I don’t think they’re implying neglect. All they’ve been suggested to do is go next door, introduce themselves, and offer to look after their dog while they’re out. Honestly, if I was the dog owner and someone nice was willing to babysit my dog for free and keep him busy etc I would be extremely happy with their kind offer.

Grimm 9:02 am 16 Oct 15

Masquara said :

Grimm said :

Or maybe I have more than a little experience in handling and training dogs and understand their behaviour quite well? This whole thing about “needing to socialise” is simply emotive and far from correct.

I’ve seen chain-mad dogs on farms – and I assure you you’re wrong.

There’s a bit of a difference between chained up and isolated/ignored dogs and a puppy pining for its mother the first few days away from her. They do not need constant attention. Spending the day alone in the back yard while the owners are at work is not detrimental to it at all.

Just waiting on somebody to suggest an animal psychologist for this traumatic event now.

As I said, if the dog has food, water and shade, it is fine. What it is doing is normal behaviour for a puppy recently separated from its mother and siblings. Turning up on your neighbours doorstep, implying they are neglecting their animal by going to work, is not exactly a great way to introduce yourself.

Masquara 8:24 pm 15 Oct 15

Grimm said :

Or maybe I have more than a little experience in handling and training dogs and understand their behaviour quite well? This whole thing about “needing to socialise” is simply emotive and far from correct.

I’ve seen chain-mad dogs on farms – and I assure you you’re wrong.

Masquara 6:35 pm 15 Oct 15

canberralyf said :

henryans said :

Maybe mind your own business for a start.
They aren’t mistreating it, aren’t doing anything illegal so leave your neighbors alone, sheesh people these days just itching to tell others how to live!
Sounds like you have lots of time on your hands, head over to
http://www.volunteeringaustralia.org/

I honestly cannot Believe I am being personally victimized for being concerned about the welfare of a puppy. Only on the #riotact.

Leaving a puppy on its own all day, distressed, is definitely not OK. Have you checked with the RSPCA? Go with their advice on what to do … if you don’t feel like having a chat to them yourself …

Tooks 5:49 pm 15 Oct 15

Grimm said :

canberralyf said :

Grimm said :

MYOB?

If it has food, water and shade, it is just a puppy being a puppy in an unfamiliar environment after being separated from its mother. It will get over it in a few days. Unfortunately not everybody can take time off work for however long it takes for a puppy to adjust.

Wow, I don’t think you could be anymore unhelpful, MYOB really??

For one it is loudly barking and crying so even if I wanted to mind my own business its cries are distracting. Secondly, puppies need to socialise especially when they are that young, even more so in the week after they are taken away from their mothers and siblings.

I agree they need to adjust to their new surrounds but neglect is not adjustment, if you can’t accept the fact your life may differ slightly for a few weeks after getting a puppy don’t get one, its pretty bloody simple.

Thank you for all the other replies though, it looks like talking to them will have to be my best bet.

Or maybe I have more than a little experience in handling and training dogs and understand their behaviour quite well? This whole thing about “needing to socialise” is simply emotive and far from correct.

You’re experienced at handling and training dogs but you reckon they don’t need socialisation? You couldn’t be more wrong.

Puppies should be socialised as much as possible before their first fear period (usually about the 12 week mark). Where people go wrong is in their understanding of socialisation when referring to puppies.

Knock on your neighbour’s door and have a chat with them about it.

Alexandra Craig 5:18 pm 15 Oct 15

canberralyf said :

henryans said :

Maybe mind your own business for a start.
They aren’t mistreating it, aren’t doing anything illegal so leave your neighbors alone, sheesh people these days just itching to tell others how to live!
Sounds like you have lots of time on your hands, head over to
http://www.volunteeringaustralia.org/

I honestly cannot Believe I am being personally victimized for being concerned about the welfare of a puppy. Only on the #riotact.

Sorry about the rude comments you’re getting back. I can only imagine that if you weren’t to do anything and then the situation occured where something bad happened to the dog people would then ask you why you didn’t do anything sooner.

Good luck with your chat to the neighbours. I’m sure if you are friendly and polite they will appreciate your concern 🙂 Good on you for caring about animals.

canberralyf 4:57 pm 15 Oct 15

henryans said :

Maybe mind your own business for a start.
They aren’t mistreating it, aren’t doing anything illegal so leave your neighbors alone, sheesh people these days just itching to tell others how to live!
Sounds like you have lots of time on your hands, head over to
http://www.volunteeringaustralia.org/

I honestly cannot Believe I am being personally victimized for being concerned about the welfare of a puppy. Only on the #riotact.

henryans 4:13 pm 15 Oct 15

Maybe mind your own business for a start.
They aren’t mistreating it, aren’t doing anything illegal so leave your neighbors alone, sheesh people these days just itching to tell others how to live!
Sounds like you have lots of time on your hands, head over to
http://www.volunteeringaustralia.org/

FrankReynolds 3:36 pm 15 Oct 15

I agree with much of the above. It’s worth just heading over and having a chat to your neighbours. We had a similar situation with one of our neighbours. They would leave very early in the morning and the dog would whine outside, waking us up.
I had a chat to them and to their credit, they addressed the issue. They were unaware that it was still an issue (it only whines when they aren’t home). I’m not sure what they did to sort it out, whether they leave to dog inside or otherwise, but different dogs will need different training. If it’s a new puppy it might just take a little while to settle in.

Grimm 2:27 pm 15 Oct 15

canberralyf said :

Grimm said :

MYOB?

If it has food, water and shade, it is just a puppy being a puppy in an unfamiliar environment after being separated from its mother. It will get over it in a few days. Unfortunately not everybody can take time off work for however long it takes for a puppy to adjust.

Wow, I don’t think you could be anymore unhelpful, MYOB really??

For one it is loudly barking and crying so even if I wanted to mind my own business its cries are distracting. Secondly, puppies need to socialise especially when they are that young, even more so in the week after they are taken away from their mothers and siblings.

I agree they need to adjust to their new surrounds but neglect is not adjustment, if you can’t accept the fact your life may differ slightly for a few weeks after getting a puppy don’t get one, its pretty bloody simple.

Thank you for all the other replies though, it looks like talking to them will have to be my best bet.

Or maybe I have more than a little experience in handling and training dogs and understand their behaviour quite well? This whole thing about “needing to socialise” is simply emotive and far from correct.

canberralyf 2:21 pm 15 Oct 15

Grimm said :

MYOB?

If it has food, water and shade, it is just a puppy being a puppy in an unfamiliar environment after being separated from its mother. It will get over it in a few days. Unfortunately not everybody can take time off work for however long it takes for a puppy to adjust.

Wow, I don’t think you could be anymore unhelpful, MYOB really??

For one it is loudly barking and crying so even if I wanted to mind my own business its cries are distracting. Secondly, puppies need to socialise especially when they are that young, even more so in the week after they are taken away from their mothers and siblings.

I agree they need to adjust to their new surrounds but neglect is not adjustment, if you can’t accept the fact your life may differ slightly for a few weeks after getting a puppy don’t get one, its pretty bloody simple.

Thank you for all the other replies though, it looks like talking to them will have to be my best bet.

Ezy 1:31 pm 15 Oct 15

Talk to your neighbours or drop a respectful letter. They are obviously new dog owners who think that it’s all good to buy a puppy and leave it alone in it’s new surroundings straight up.

– would having the dog over to hang out with your dog be an option?

Grimm 1:16 pm 15 Oct 15

MYOB?

If it has food, water and shade, it is just a puppy being a puppy in an unfamiliar environment after being separated from its mother. It will get over it in a few days. Unfortunately not everybody can take time off work for however long it takes for a puppy to adjust.

Alexandra Craig 1:08 pm 15 Oct 15

Well, if it was me, I would write a friendly note introducing yourself saying you’ve noticed they have a new puppy and that you don’t want him to be lonely so you’re more than happy to look after him when they’re out etc. It would be good for both dogs’ socialisation skills too.

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