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Downer murderer asks to be shielded from victims’ families

By johnboy - 17 May 2011 48

The Canberra Times reports that Scott McDougall’s lawyers are asking the court to to spare him from facing the families of Struan Bolas and Julie Tattersall whom he brutally murdered in Downer in 2008 when he is sentenced.

Normally an important part of justice for families of victims is seeing the sentence delivered in person.

But having had some dealings with elements from the familes in the years since the murder we here at RiotACT have a great deal of sympathy for the request.

Let’s just say they’re a special mob justifying at least a special request.

Justice Gray is considering it.

What’s Your opinion?


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48 Responses to
Downer murderer asks to be shielded from victims’ families
Mr Gillespie 8:57 pm 17 May 11

Never mind the victim’s families!!!! WHAT ABOUT THE KILLER? He is the most dangerous animal ever to go through the ACT judicial system. He is not sorry, no rational human being can account for the kind of ferocity the judge described as “appalling”. It’s all in the judgment, see http://www.courts.act.gov.au/supreme/judgments/mcdougall1.htm

johnboy 8:47 pm 17 May 11

I’m comfortable saying the victim families are the scariest and most unpleasant single group I’ve encountered in a decade running this site.

Just today i’ve had two emails from them dragging my ex girlfriend into their revolting vengeance fantasies.

Captain RAAF 8:44 pm 17 May 11

I suggest you pull your head out and stuff your self with intelegence

lolz, Intelligence fail!

cleo 8:27 pm 17 May 11

There is no threat of violence from family’s, that’s just so ridiculous.

Unfortunately Canberra courts don’t’ handcuff their offenders, only going in and out of court, not while in court, at one stage the authorities were considering having the murderer in shackles for the trial, not sure Ken Archer would have liked that, that just gives you some idea how dangerous the murderer is, if he can do that to friends, heaven help us if he took a dislike to someone.

Personally he should be looked up and the key thrown away, he is just too dangerous to be let out in public.

cleo 8:09 pm 17 May 11

Oh Johnny you have got to be kidding, I think you have ‘slightly’ exaggerated the victims family’s, if anything Ken Archer doesn’t want his client to GO OFF! and he will, he is extremely dangerous, once he hears his sentencing.
You weren’t in court to see what the murderer did to the family’s, and The Canberra Times did not report it as it happened, all one sided, as they cannot say anything about the murderer, as this would be viewed as a prejudice, as he is the one who is to be sentenced.
Just Ken Archer playing his games, and looking for sympathy for his client, and also keeping in mind if his client wants to appeal his sentence.

ezmae 7:26 pm 17 May 11

The Frots said :

johnboy said :

Holditz said :

Isn’t this a purely voluntary thing, and a perpetrator can’t be forced to meet with his/her victims?

They’re talking about just having them in the court room.

Hmmm. Well, without knowing the history (I gather there is some!) stuff them. Keep them out (if its as bad as what this thread is intimating).

Are you kidding? yes clearly you do know nothing ! … how insensitive are you?
These families need this chance, and unless you have lost a family member or close friend to a brutal murder I suggest you pull your head out ! and stuff your self with intelegence
Johnboy , bit odd of you , are you friends with this convicted murderer? again very insulting to the victims left behind from this horrible nightmare … this monster deserves no rights in the matter

Mr Gillespie 7:23 pm 17 May 11

Let him sit in the four walls of his maximum-security cell at the AMC with the other putrids in there. He’s gonna have a lot of years to reflect on his failure of a life, and what he has done.

The Frots 5:12 pm 17 May 11

johnboy said :

Holditz said :

Isn’t this a purely voluntary thing, and a perpetrator can’t be forced to meet with his/her victims?

They’re talking about just having them in the court room.

Hmmm. Well, without knowing the history (I gather there is some!) stuff them. Keep them out (if its as bad as what this thread is intimating).

Mr Gillespie 5:00 pm 17 May 11

Having now been convicted of murder on both counts, Scott Alexander McDougall, through his defence counsel Ken Archer, has asked Justice Gray that he not be in the same courtroom as the families of the victims he butchered to death in September 2008.

There are concerns he will go off his head when his sentence is finally handed down which won’t go his way, after overwhelming evidence securing both murder convictions which his taxpayer-funded defence counsel — rather than trying to get him off the double-murder charges — has instead asked that he be excused from the courtroom, and hear his sentence from a “remote location.”

McDougall just can’t face the fact that the crimes for which he has been convicted, involves such a horrific level of violence, as detailed in Justice Gray’s judgment. During the trial, while he admitted “causing the deaths” of his victims, he refused to man up and take responsibility by:

(a) magically having a memory dropout from the time Straun Bolas allegedly came at him with the meat cleaver to the time both his victims lay dead on the floor, and

(b) pleading not guilty to both murders throughout, thinking he could exploit the ACT’s weak murder law which resulted in killers escaping murder convictions over the past 13 years prior to this case.

What his lawyers are saying as reported in the aforementioned Canberra Times article is basically that he is saying how dare the families of his victims have their say in the court after what he had done.

I think the victim’s families are entitled to feel this angry given the circumstances of the horrific nature of these particular murders, don’t you reckon?

johnboy 4:41 pm 17 May 11

Holditz said :

Isn’t this a purely voluntary thing, and a perpetrator can’t be forced to meet with his/her victims?

They’re talking about just having them in the court room.

Holditz 4:33 pm 17 May 11

Isn’t this a purely voluntary thing, and a perpetrator can’t be forced to meet with his/her victims?

Captain RAAF 1:18 pm 17 May 11

johnboy said :

Gerry-Built said :

“special” or not; if it is “normally an important part of justice” for families, why make an exception for the one guy who was exceptional enough to earn the first murder conviction in >10 years? He already knew who he was dealing with…

I’m sugar coating it with “special”.

I think there are legitimate fears for order and safety in the court with these people and frankly they might not deserve satisfaction.

On the basis of my dealings with them I’d understand if the judge eventually decides to agree to this request.

Would’nt be my neighbours would they JB?

Gerry-Built 1:17 pm 17 May 11

johnboy said :

I’m sugar coating it with “special”.

I think there are legitimate fears for order and safety in the court with these people and frankly they might not deserve satisfaction.

On the basis of my dealings with them I’d understand if the judge eventually decides to agree to this request.

Well, I guess that *is* why we have the magistrates make these decisions… plus, they have “all the facts” too…

johnboy 1:06 pm 17 May 11

Gerry-Built said :

“special” or not; if it is “normally an important part of justice” for families, why make an exception for the one guy who was exceptional enough to earn the first murder conviction in >10 years? He already knew who he was dealing with…

I’m sugar coating it with “special”.

I think there are legitimate fears for order and safety in the court with these people and frankly they might not deserve satisfaction.

On the basis of my dealings with them I’d understand if the judge eventually decides to agree to this request.

Gerry-Built 1:02 pm 17 May 11

“special” or not; if it is “normally an important part of justice” for families, why make an exception for the one guy who was exceptional enough to earn the first murder conviction in >10 years? He already knew who he was dealing with…

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