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Eastman mess highlighting the farce of the ACT Judicial System

By johnboy - 19 November 2013 67

The Canberra Times has the make you cry news that the ACT Director of Public Prosecutions, having failed to apply within time, is seeking an extension so they can kibosh the inquiry into the Eastman conviction for the murder of Colin Winchester.

It gets better though because the Full Bench of the Supreme Court needs to hear the matter and they’ve all been involved at one time or another in David Eastman’s interminable shenanigans.

It all rather highlights that a city of 370,000 has no business trying to run a completely independent legal system and we really should just pay another state to do it for us.

Because we’re certainly not doing it well right now.

What’s Your opinion?


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67 Responses to
Eastman mess highlighting the farce of the ACT Judicial System
Wilco 12:52 pm 20 Nov 13

Tooks said :

Antagonist said :

Special G said :

It’s the DPP’s job to appeal something which is going to take millions of dollars and prosecutors away from doing their job running around after something which has been appealed ‘how many times’?

I would expect they could spend the resources better sorting out the Supreme Court backlog or focusing on other prosecutions.

If the DPP was so concerned with saving millions of taxpayer dollars and having prosecutors taken away from their jobs, then why did it take them 15 months to get off their overpaid lazy asses to lodge a late appeal? Their procrastination has, in fact, cost the taxpayer MORE money.

Overpaid? Lol. I guess you don’t know what a typical prosecutor earns.

Considerably more than a solicitor in a small – medium sized private practice and with a lesser case load!

Affirmative Action M 12:00 pm 20 Nov 13

Lots of jurisdictions in Australia have a high profile case or two where the police, DPP and the Courts have got it wrong and made spectacular stuff ups. Ours just happens to be the Eastman case.

Tooks 9:35 am 20 Nov 13

Antagonist said :

Special G said :

It’s the DPP’s job to appeal something which is going to take millions of dollars and prosecutors away from doing their job running around after something which has been appealed ‘how many times’?

I would expect they could spend the resources better sorting out the Supreme Court backlog or focusing on other prosecutions.

If the DPP was so concerned with saving millions of taxpayer dollars and having prosecutors taken away from their jobs, then why did it take them 15 months to get off their overpaid lazy asses to lodge a late appeal? Their procrastination has, in fact, cost the taxpayer MORE money.

Overpaid? Lol. I guess you don’t know what a typical prosecutor earns.

Tooks 9:33 am 20 Nov 13

Comic_and_Gamer_Nerd said :

Tooks said :

Nice conspiracy theory Robbo. Complete bulls*** of course but interesting. I think a lot of crackpots will be disappointed at the outcome of this inquiry. The right man is behind bars, which is exactly where the maggot belongs.

I won’t be drawn into an argument so don’t waste your time replying.

Haha it’s always lol when you say that, yet cannot stop yourself from replying.

Shhh. I was trying to get a reply from Robbo. Btw, find me a thread (other than this one) where I’ve said I won’t reply and then gone against my word. Bet you can’t. In fact I’ll put $50 on it.

In all honesty, although I think the right man is locked up, I think the inquiry is a good thing given the 19 points raised. I just think some of these conspiracy theories, while entertaining, are pretty loopy.

Eastman wasn’t a “convenient scapegoat” as some like to say. Mafia were in the frame early and Eastman wasn’t considered a serious suspect until months later.

Antagonist 11:20 pm 19 Nov 13

Special G said :

It’s the DPP’s job to appeal something which is going to take millions of dollars and prosecutors away from doing their job running around after something which has been appealed ‘how many times’?

I would expect they could spend the resources better sorting out the Supreme Court backlog or focusing on other prosecutions.

If the DPP was so concerned with saving millions of taxpayer dollars and having prosecutors taken away from their jobs, then why did it take them 15 months to get off their overpaid lazy asses to lodge a late appeal? Their procrastination has, in fact, cost the taxpayer MORE money.

Special G 9:11 pm 19 Nov 13

It’s the DPP’s job to appeal something which is going to take millions of dollars and prosecutors away from doing their job running around after something which has been appealed ‘how many times’?

I would expect they could spend the resources better sorting out the Supreme Court backlog or focusing on other prosecutions.

Comic_and_Gamer_Nerd 7:59 pm 19 Nov 13

Tooks said :

Nice conspiracy theory Robbo. Complete bulls*** of course but interesting. I think a lot of crackpots will be disappointed at the outcome of this inquiry. The right man is behind bars, which is exactly where the maggot belongs.

I won’t be drawn into an argument so don’t waste your time replying.

Haha it’s always lol when you say that, yet cannot stop yourself from replying.

cranky 6:08 pm 19 Nov 13

Sorry Tooks,

I’m with posters #6 & #7. The effort the DPP is going to, to disable this enquiry, positively demands the question as to why. And I do not believe that waste of public money is their incentive.

Sorry, but this is not the only case harking back to the 70’s and 80’s that investigations conducted by the ACT AFP have raised questions on the conduct of investigations.

Antagonist 5:47 pm 19 Nov 13

IrishPete said :

… the DPP’s actions are really suspicious. In whose interest is it to stop this inquiry now, or to limit it? It’s certainly not “in the public interest”.

So the DPP should just leave it alone and let the inquiry get on with its job. Pompous asses.

+1. It is very much within ‘the public interest’ that this enquiry go ahead.

Tooks 4:11 pm 19 Nov 13

Nice conspiracy theory Robbo. Complete bulls*** of course but interesting. I think a lot of crackpots will be disappointed at the outcome of this inquiry. The right man is behind bars, which is exactly where the maggot belongs.

I won’t be drawn into an argument so don’t waste your time replying.

Robertson 3:45 pm 19 Nov 13

The DPP at the time were thoroughly sold on the AFP’s (or, to be more specific, …no, he may still be alive…) work of (likely) fiction pinning the blame on a convenient local nutter.

They are still embarrassed at the idea that the case they prepared and the appalling circus that ensued in court should be exposed to any avoidable scrutiny.

I wouldn’t compare the DPP with Eddie Obeid. I’d compare them with the 6 players banned from playing in the next test against Ireland for hanging around nightclubs instead of trying to do something about their poor performance. Incompetent. Delusional. Overpaid.

The Eddie Obeids of the Winchester affair are largely retired AFPers.
Here’s a question: how much of the Operation Seville “AFP-authorised” dope-crop was destroyed by the cops, and how much made it to market? Would you be astounded to hear the figure “95%”?
Why wasn’t *that* investigated? Maybe because a conveniently disruptive circus involving a nutter called Eastman was engineered to take the heat off the real issue?

IrishPete 3:32 pm 19 Nov 13

I try to to steer clear of conspiracy theories, but the DPP’s actions are really suspicious. In whose interest is it to stop this inquiry now, or to limit it? It’s certainly not “in the public interest”. And any fool knows that any little twist in a case involving Eastman is complicated by everyone in Canberra with any connection with the legal system having profited from his case at some point.

So the DPP should just leave it alone and let the inquiry get on with its job. Pompous asses.

IP

Affirmative Action M 2:54 pm 19 Nov 13

It makes a mockery of the Justice System AND a total conflict of interest that the DPP is allowed to appeal this. A bit like giving Eddy Obeid the power of veto over whether he should be investigated.

PBO 2:28 pm 19 Nov 13

PantsMan said :

It’s like they’ve really got someting to hide!

I agree, why not just have 100% transparency with all information and evidence to do with this case? It is now within the public interest, it will probably expose bad investigatory techniques and mistakes with evidence and well………. he just might be crazy innocent.

PantsMan 1:04 pm 19 Nov 13

It’s like they’ve really got someting to hide!

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