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Election Wrap – 9 September

johnboy 9 September 2008 25

General:

The Canberra Times informs us of the idiot bickering between Stanhope and Seselja over who’s actually dodging a public debate between the two of them.

Labor:

Long to reign over us… The Canberra Times brings word that Jon Stanhope is promising to serve out a four year term if he’s returned as Chief Minister.

Liberals:

Steve Doszpot has released his TV ad onto the web.

CAP:

Roger Nicoll has been announced as a candidate for Ginninderra:

    Best known for his community health development work in West Belconnen, the Flynn school campaign and youth and sporting associations, Roger Nicoll has lived in Belconnen for 40 years and been actively involved in community life. Roger is married with two children and lives in Flynn.

    As Chair of the West Belconnnen Health Co-op, Roger is heading up the community’s effort to attract bulk-billing doctors and allied health and wellbeing services to West Belconnen.

CAP’s also announced a policy called “Vital schools, Vibrant community hubs”.


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25 Responses to Election Wrap – 9 September
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Gungahlin Al Gungahlin Al 9:26 am 10 Sep 08

I wonder if say the ALP had 8 elected, meaning 9 others, whether there’d actually be the justification for the Libs to claim the CM should be one of theirs? Or perhaps there could be an actually consensual government formed, with no party having primacy? If that were the case, then I could see the Greens having more ‘elbow room’, without being seen to side with the people who gave us a decade of Howard’s Way.

Or is there some bit of legislation I haven’t bothered to read that locks us into party politics?

The alternative would be that there were enough cross benchers elected to form a government without either ALP or Libs, but I think that unlikely. Most opinion has the cross benchers at somewhere between 1 and 3.

Thumper Thumper 8:19 am 10 Sep 08

Oh the Libs would do a lot for power, but they’re mostly happy to just be in the Assembly, it’s Labor that stands to lose what they already have

An insightful remark. Indeed, I think some of the Libs are quite happy just to be there in opposition. Whether they want the responsibility of actual government is another thing.

As for the Greens, they’ll never vote for a Lib CM, it simply isn’t in there ideology.

Jonathon Reynolds Jonathon Reynolds 12:12 am 10 Sep 08

novice said :

Forget the Greens. Their resumes are so underwhelming in public administration that running a chook raffle would be difficult for them.

You really have not looked at the calibre of most of the candidates (of all political persuasions) standing… they are almost ALL pretty underwhelming.

novice novice 7:40 pm 09 Sep 08

Forget the Greens. Their resumes are so underwhelming in public administration that running a chook raffle would be difficult for them. How about we set aside the Chief Ministers Office and limit its power to the ACT’s Federal responsibilities and set up a Local Administrative Council to run the ACT Municipality funded by the ACT Chief Ministers Office. We then have ONE election where we vote for a Chief Minister and vote for 16 ‘councillors’and forget these self aggrandising power plays. This way we get to vote for a Chief Minister who has the job of convincing us that he/she is capable of running something and leave the other candidates to represent themsleves anyway they like. At least we then know what we are getting and have voted for.

johnboy johnboy 7:09 pm 09 Sep 08

Oh the Libs would do a lot for power, but they’re mostly happy to just be in the Assembly, it’s Labor that stands to lose what they already have.

The invitation to all candidates remains open… We just haven’t heard from Brendan.

BerraBoy68 BerraBoy68 7:00 pm 09 Sep 08

caf said :

Much of Westminster practice is carried on through tradition rather than codified in written rules.

Yep, the good old ‘Convention’. Anybody remember when Ministerial Responsibility used to exist? Or when it smashed into teeny weeny little pieces?

On topic, I have to agree with JB, except I’d say both parties would race though “a nostril deep…mile of vomit” to win the election. Pity a certain Mr Smyth is short, drowning in vomit wouldn’t be a nice way to go.

Any chance Brendan will be doing the Sim Challenge JB? Now that’d be fun and I’d be surprised if he didn’t accept an invitation.

caf caf 6:10 pm 09 Sep 08

I think they’d make the Greens stare them down, and I don’t think the Greens would win that contest. The Greens’ only real threat is to support a Liberal alternative CM, and if they actually carried through on that, a significant portion of their base would be quite cheesed off.

johnboy johnboy 5:58 pm 09 Sep 08

caf said :

Really? I don’t think the ALP would blink in the face of Greens attempting to impose their choice of CM on a potential ALP minority government. Black Jack McEwen they are not!

I think the ALP’d wade nostril deep through a mile of vomit to stay in power.

Casting over their leader to secure the cross bench wouldn’t slow them down for a second.

caf caf 5:56 pm 09 Sep 08

Really? I don’t think the ALP would blink in the face of Greens attempting to impose their choice of CM on a potential ALP minority government. Black Jack McEwen they are not!

Gungahlin Al Gungahlin Al 5:33 pm 09 Sep 08

I think not Novice. And this is the sort of spin I’d expect from someone wedded to the majority rubber-stamp situation we have now.

Because nothing happens without a majority vote. Cross-benchers can’t achieve changes solely by themselves. They also have to get other people on side in order to get something up.

They have the *balance* of power – not power in its own right. And anyone who is fruity can expect to be harshly dealt with electorally.

More of a consensus approach to decisions will almost always result in a more considered outcome.

johnboy johnboy 5:26 pm 09 Sep 08

Yes novice, much better to abandon that democracy thing in favour of one abusive and angry commenter’s opinion.

novice novice 5:09 pm 09 Sep 08

The ACT is heading for sub par economic growth which has implications for every wallet in Canberra and I can’t believe your usual Posters can’t see this or care to be concerned. You give inexperienced and looney candidates ‘balance of power’ pursuing useless, minor and poorly thought agendas and you are going to get a govt and economy you deserve. Man, suck it up. The last thing we need are the Greens with more say.

johnboy johnboy 3:50 pm 09 Sep 08

Probably because recent post runs off story number, where the front page runs on datestamps.

And it’s really not anywhere of our list of issues.

Gungahlin Al Gungahlin Al 3:41 pm 09 Sep 08

My point was that it is already on the public record that potential cross-benchers (mainly the Greens) are open to considering alternatives to Stanhope as CM. Like PM I believe the ALP would put government before personal aspirations, if push came to shove.

As I’ve said elsewhere, a minority government would return some accountability to the ACT that it doesn’t currently have. The choice of CM and Ministers would be the big first test of that.

Have to say I’m surprised there haven’t been more people on RA jumping onto this possibility. In “a Labor town” and on a forum where discontent with Stanhope is voiced daily, I would have thought the idea of a minority government with a leadership change would have been seen by many as a viable option.

(And JB: why are posts disappearing off the front page but not appearing on the recent articles list?)

caf caf 1:27 pm 09 Sep 08

Sure, lots of things may happen, and I’ve picked my words carefully – I’m not predicting what will or won’t happen, just pointing out what is established practice. I don’t think it’s hubris for Stanhope to assume that Westminster tradition would be upheld.

(Thanks for the historical footnote – I wasn’t sure if this kind of thing had been carried out in the past – the example is certainly instructive).

PM PM 1:20 pm 09 Sep 08

That’s right caf, but if the cross-benchers refuse to support a Stanhope minority government, Labor may put up another candidate.

I believe the CAP have said they wouldn’t support a Stanhope minority govt, but wouldn’t reject supporting a different Labor leader.

BTW – not entirely unprecedented in practice. For example, in the 60s, the Country Party refused to support a coalition with McMahon as PM immediately after Holt’s death, which added to Gorton’s support amongst his Liberal colleagues. Not quite a minority govt, but similar in terms of the implications ie Libs were threatened with losing government with Leader A as opposed to Leader B.

Aurelius Aurelius 1:15 pm 09 Sep 08

caf, If we’re talking written rules in the Westminster system, then political parties and Prime Ministers don’t exist. The ACT system is a little different in not having a “Crown” though, so if the Assembly can’t decide on a Chief Minister, then who knows what happens?

caf caf 12:58 pm 09 Sep 08

Much of Westminster practice is carried on through tradition rather than codified in written rules. Including that the governing party selects the leader of the government. If you go only by the written rules, then as an example, federally the Governor-General can select whoever he likes as PM.

Gungahlin Al Gungahlin Al 12:50 pm 09 Sep 08

My point precisely.
It was the subject of a couple of large articles in CT a couple of weeks back, where the Greens indicated it wouldn’t be a given that the CM role would be unchanged.
So they have the potential to bring about major change in the parliament for the next term.

Jonathon Reynolds Jonathon Reynolds 12:44 pm 09 Sep 08

caf said :

it would be a pretty big departure from Westminster practice (unprecedented?) for the cross benches to get to decide on any ministerial position, let alone Chief Minister.

Incorrect:
I can’t find the specific piece of legislation I’m looking for… but the Chief Minister is actually (sel)elected by the elected members of the Assembly. Each party capable of forming government puts forward their preferred candidate for Chief Minister and the successful candidate is then decided by a majority vote of the Assembly.

The Ministerial positions, once the governing party has been selected, are a matter for the specific party.

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