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Evolution of Crace from bushland to suburb (and the devolution of the Garden city).

By farq - 7 August 2015 61

crace

The Canberra Times has this week published photos tracing the evolution of Crace from bushland to suburb. 

The gutters are nearly touching! Didn’t anyone who built out there want a garden?

Can the people living in Crace open a window without hearing what the neighbours are watching on TV? Can they hear each other when they flush a toilet?

Prison exercise yards are larger than the backyards shown in the aerial photos. There is not even enough space for a dog to run around.

Is this the future of Canberra suburbs?

What’s Your opinion?


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61 Responses to
Evolution of Crace from bushland to suburb (and the devolution of the Garden city).
JC 2:54 pm 07 Aug 15

Southmouth said :

JC said :

Southmouth said :

JC said :

Southmouth said :

There is some weird Stockholm Syndrome type effect happening in Canberra where developers have successfully convinced large sections of the community that tiny blocks are conducive to a great lifestyle. This is a country town, it’s not Minsk

A ‘town’ that is already building on it’s borders, and with people complaining about urban infill in their leafy 1960’s suburbs.

So what’s the solution?

And as mentioned above it is not a unique Canberra thing either.

Yep greed is now the only motivation eveeywhere

So what is your solution?

Get rid of negative gearing and capital gains tax discount so that family owner occupiers will be the primary market for new homes

These houses are not empty. So that says to me that the demand is there and these houses are very much needed. Might change the cost, but that is a different issue again.

vintage123 1:28 pm 07 Aug 15

Southmouth said :

JC said :

Southmouth said :

JC said :

Southmouth said :

There is some weird Stockholm Syndrome type effect happening in Canberra where developers have successfully convinced large sections of the community that tiny blocks are conducive to a great lifestyle. This is a country town, it’s not Minsk

A ‘town’ that is already building on it’s borders, and with people complaining about urban infill in their leafy 1960’s suburbs.

So what’s the solution?

And as mentioned above it is not a unique Canberra thing either.

Yep greed is now the only motivation eveeywhere

So what is your solution?

Get rid of negative gearing and capital gains tax discount so that family owner occupiers will be the primary market for new homes

They definitely won’t get rid of negative gearing, and IF they are brave enough to modify it, all that will happens is that it will only apply to new homes. So not good if owner occupiers want to buy new homes.
There is a miniscle chance they may alter a tiny percentage of tax deduction inclusions, but that doesn’t seem to be gaining any traction. Things like modifying the 100% income tax write off, application to alternate income etc, travel to investment properties etc and hypothetical depreciation schedules etc.

They may look at capital gains tax concessions, but I doubt they will apply CGT to PPOR, and as for modifying the 50% concession of CGT on investment properties, they may alter the percentage, but they won’t scrap it. Problem is if they change anything all it will do is increase the prices initially whilst the market adjusts, but things won’t get any cheaper, as we now live in an international climate, whereby international investors are more wealthy than australians.

I guess you can’t win all battles, so my advice to people of late, has been, if you want a house to live in and you can’t afford to buy it to live in now, maybe structure it as an investment property and lever the negative gearing rules to your advantage, possibly moving into the property later in life. It’s been working great for those on salary.

Southmouth 1:04 pm 07 Aug 15

JC said :

Southmouth said :

JC said :

Southmouth said :

There is some weird Stockholm Syndrome type effect happening in Canberra where developers have successfully convinced large sections of the community that tiny blocks are conducive to a great lifestyle. This is a country town, it’s not Minsk

A ‘town’ that is already building on it’s borders, and with people complaining about urban infill in their leafy 1960’s suburbs.

So what’s the solution?

And as mentioned above it is not a unique Canberra thing either.

Yep greed is now the only motivation eveeywhere

So what is your solution?

Get rid of negative gearing and capital gains tax discount so that family owner occupiers will be the primary market for new homes

vintage123 12:24 pm 07 Aug 15

vintage123 said :

Rollersk8r said :

Well Crace is hardly unique. Gungahlin – and all the new development in Molonglo etc – is all based on halving the normal block size, while doubling the normal house size. It’s all 400 to 500k for a block, if you’re lucky, with a house for 350 to 500 – which averages out to thousands of $800,000 houses…

People seem to have the money…

And I can certainly see the appeal of the vast living spaces in brand new houses these days, although missing out on a backyard is not for me.

Not too sure on your 300m2 to 500m2 houses mate, they are definitely not that large. At $1900 to $2200 a m2 to build you won’t fit a 500m2 house plus land into a $800k budget, that’s for sure, especially with land going for $400k+. Most two story places are around 220m2 + garage 45m2 on 500m2 blocks for high $800s. They feel bigger because they use higher ceilings and clever layout as compared to the traditional 100m2 canberra three bed govie.

Apologies on this one rollersk8r, I misread your post. V123

vintage123 12:20 pm 07 Aug 15

Southmouth said :

JC said :

Southmouth said :

There is some weird Stockholm Syndrome type effect happening in Canberra where developers have successfully convinced large sections of the community that tiny blocks are conducive to a great lifestyle. This is a country town, it’s not Minsk

A ‘town’ that is already building on it’s borders, and with people complaining about urban infill in their leafy 1960’s suburbs.

So what’s the solution?

And as mentioned above it is not a unique Canberra thing either.

Yep greed is now the only motivation eveeywhere

It’s not so much greed, it’s just that housing in Australia is a huge priority for people. When you consider its been such a gravy train for the last twenty years then it shouldn’t surprise people that so many industries have built their business around the housing and construction industry. On average ( and you have to remember that averages include the whole of Australia, and their are a lot of cheap remote houses), but on average australian wide housing has increased 457% between 1995 and 2015. So that suggests to a whole 20 year working generation that housing is assure bet for both investing and career opportunities. Some people have worked twenty years during time of ever increasing home prices and still struggle to enter a booming market. They don’t really see the small block, close windows, high density issues, all they see is the FOMO syndrome and are happy to pay as much as it takes to enter the market.

So in short I think the new generation are blinkered into buying anything that’s new, irrespective of its value. And if they don’t buy it someone else (investors) or (middle class chinese) will.

vintage123 12:11 pm 07 Aug 15

Rollersk8r said :

Well Crace is hardly unique. Gungahlin – and all the new development in Molonglo etc – is all based on halving the normal block size, while doubling the normal house size. It’s all 400 to 500k for a block, if you’re lucky, with a house for 350 to 500 – which averages out to thousands of $800,000 houses…

People seem to have the money…

And I can certainly see the appeal of the vast living spaces in brand new houses these days, although missing out on a backyard is not for me.

Not too sure on your 300m2 to 500m2 houses mate, they are definitely not that large. At $1900 to $2200 a m2 to build you won’t fit a 500m2 house plus land into a $800k budget, that’s for sure, especially with land going for $400k+. Most two story places are around 220m2 + garage 45m2 on 500m2 blocks for high $800s. They feel bigger because they use higher ceilings and clever layout as compared to the traditional 100m2 canberra three bed govie.

JC 12:11 pm 07 Aug 15

Southmouth said :

JC said :

Southmouth said :

There is some weird Stockholm Syndrome type effect happening in Canberra where developers have successfully convinced large sections of the community that tiny blocks are conducive to a great lifestyle. This is a country town, it’s not Minsk

A ‘town’ that is already building on it’s borders, and with people complaining about urban infill in their leafy 1960’s suburbs.

So what’s the solution?

And as mentioned above it is not a unique Canberra thing either.

Yep greed is now the only motivation eveeywhere

So what is your solution?

Southmouth 12:00 pm 07 Aug 15

JC said :

Southmouth said :

There is some weird Stockholm Syndrome type effect happening in Canberra where developers have successfully convinced large sections of the community that tiny blocks are conducive to a great lifestyle. This is a country town, it’s not Minsk

A ‘town’ that is already building on it’s borders, and with people complaining about urban infill in their leafy 1960’s suburbs.

So what’s the solution?

And as mentioned above it is not a unique Canberra thing either.

Yep greed is now the only motivation eveeywhere

JC 11:39 am 07 Aug 15

Southmouth said :

There is some weird Stockholm Syndrome type effect happening in Canberra where developers have successfully convinced large sections of the community that tiny blocks are conducive to a great lifestyle. This is a country town, it’s not Minsk

A ‘town’ that is already building on it’s borders, and with people complaining about urban infill in their leafy 1960’s suburbs.

So what’s the solution?

And as mentioned above it is not a unique Canberra thing either.

JC 11:37 am 07 Aug 15

Rollersk8r said :

Well Crace is hardly unique. Gungahlin –

It is not unique to Gungahlin or the ACT either. This is the way it is the country over, well in the mainland Capital cities at least.

Southmouth 11:23 am 07 Aug 15

There is some weird Stockholm Syndrome type effect happening in Canberra where developers have successfully convinced large sections of the community that tiny blocks are conducive to a great lifestyle. This is a country town, it’s not Minsk

Holden Caulfield 11:04 am 07 Aug 15

“Can the people living in Crace open a window without hearing what the neighbours are watching on TV? Can they hear each other when they flush a toilet?”

People were experiencing these same issues in some sections of Ngunnawal in the late 90s. Is Crace really that different compared with other areas in Gungahlin?

Rollersk8r 11:01 am 07 Aug 15

Well Crace is hardly unique. Gungahlin – and all the new development in Molonglo etc – is all based on halving the normal block size, while doubling the normal house size. It’s all 400 to 500k for a block, if you’re lucky, with a house for 350 to 500 – which averages out to thousands of $800,000 houses…

People seem to have the money…

And I can certainly see the appeal of the vast living spaces in brand new houses these days, although missing out on a backyard is not for me.

vintage123 10:19 am 07 Aug 15

By modern standards, crace is quite good.

The land sizes are reasonable. The homes are generous. Set backs and side access are standard.

The majority of homes have alfresco areas under the roofline. They are adequate garden and backyards under the revised living culture.

It was a case of supply and demand. Prices are strong in crace. High 800s, some million plus is not uncommon.

Crace is designed and much more spacious than the next releases of Moncrief and Throsby.

Paul Costigan 9:28 am 07 Aug 15

This is a big one. I have studied documentation and photographed this new suburb as the government development agency lauded it as something very wonderful. There’s so much to discuss about this very controlled suburb environment.

It is likewise a bit of a shock to someone who likes diversity and trees and so many other things about good urban design.

Yet they sold it all and people came. So people were happy to buy in. And there’s still quite a bit of building going on. That’s the way the world works.

The marketing was pure spin. Academics have studied this suburb but from what I have read they have taken a soft approach in order not to upset anyone in the bureaucracies with whom they have close relationships.

I hope to do a much longer piece one day on Crace and the thinking behind it and how it represents such a different style to the more established areas of Canberra.

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