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Evolution of Crace from bushland to suburb (and the devolution of the Garden city).

farq 7 August 2015 61

crace

The Canberra Times has this week published photos tracing the evolution of Crace from bushland to suburb. 

The gutters are nearly touching! Didn’t anyone who built out there want a garden?

Can the people living in Crace open a window without hearing what the neighbours are watching on TV? Can they hear each other when they flush a toilet?

Prison exercise yards are larger than the backyards shown in the aerial photos. There is not even enough space for a dog to run around.

Is this the future of Canberra suburbs?


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61 Responses to Evolution of Crace from bushland to suburb (and the devolution of the Garden city).
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dungfungus dungfungus 8:16 am 18 Aug 15

JacquieE said :

The thing that exercises my mind re. the McMansions around Gunghalin is: Vacuuming. Who does all that vacuuming?? Or don’t they?

Some bloke called Dyson?

JacquieE JacquieE 11:40 pm 17 Aug 15

The thing that exercises my mind re. the McMansions around Gunghalin is: Vacuuming. Who does all that vacuuming?? Or don’t they?

dungfungus dungfungus 3:35 pm 12 Aug 15

watto23 said :

dungfungus said :

Coming to a suburb near you:
https://www.wilsonparking.com.au/park/2256_Burbury-Close-Car-Park_Burbury-Close-Barton

Do you really honestly believe some of the things you post. This carpark is for the new hotels and workers in the area. Whats it got to do with urban planning? Other than more BS fear rubbish that has no grounding in the real world.

According to JC this carpark doesn’t exist.

watto23 watto23 2:13 pm 12 Aug 15

dungfungus said :

Coming to a suburb near you:
https://www.wilsonparking.com.au/park/2256_Burbury-Close-Car-Park_Burbury-Close-Barton

Do you really honestly believe some of the things you post. This carpark is for the new hotels and workers in the area. Whats it got to do with urban planning? Other than more BS fear rubbish that has no grounding in the real world.

MERC600 MERC600 1:48 pm 12 Aug 15

Orright. Orright.. No need to tell me twice. I can take a hint. No one gives a 4X about the Crace over 55 joint.

So I will wheel out the ‘gas-drinking, piston-clinking, air-polluting, smoke-belching, four-wheeled buggy from Detroit City’ ( copyright Mr Jerry Reed ) and have a look myself.

dungfungus dungfungus 10:25 am 12 Aug 15

JC said :

dungfungus said :

“Canberra was meant to be a special city. A garden city. A place that learned from the mistakes of other more crowded cities.”
Very true; and under-grounding as many power lines and other services that are carried by poles in other cities is part of that garden.
That will all end in 2018 when the ugly wire-scape that is necessary to support an unnecessary 100 year old technology starts up.

The burbs are hardly the city.

And you wrong about the wires. A good 50-60% of Canberra has overhead power lines. They are of course mostly in peoples back yards rather than front.

We are talking about Canberra which includes all the suburbs. The point I was alluding to is that the proposed route of the light rail is currently pole & wire free but that will change.
I also said “many power lines…”, not all.

JC JC 9:53 am 12 Aug 15

dungfungus said :

“Canberra was meant to be a special city. A garden city. A place that learned from the mistakes of other more crowded cities.”
Very true; and under-grounding as many power lines and other services that are carried by poles in other cities is part of that garden.
That will all end in 2018 when the ugly wire-scape that is necessary to support an unnecessary 100 year old technology starts up.

The burbs are hardly the city.

And you wrong about the wires. A good 50-60% of Canberra has overhead power lines. They are of course mostly in peoples back yards rather than front.

dungfungus dungfungus 9:13 am 12 Aug 15

JC said :

farq said :

JC said :

For sure these suburbs are not for all, that is for sure, but clearly people are buying and building so voting with their feet.

&

beebee said :

The suburb is fall intents and purposes a mass of apartment/unit living. Seriously, neighbour proximity is marginal and what backyard? But at the end of the day no one is holding a gun to people’s heads, they clearly are happy with such living.

As far as I’m concerned Crace lies somewhere between FOMO and District 9.

It’s no wonder that people buy it when it’s the only option. Canberra suburban development has sunken to a point where people just have no option but to buy into bad developments. With the amount of money they are spending it’s no wonder they justify it and claim they like being on small blocks (seriously who prefers a block half the size of the minimum we grew up with?).

I agree with rubaiyat’s excellent post. I especially agree with the observation that in most cases the drive that makes people build such oversized houses is a craving for status. I’d like to add it’s also a lack of class and taste.

When friends who left Canberra 15 years ago come back to visit family and see old friends (me) their favorite topic of discussion is how Canberra seems to have given up on all the things that made it special. How we have dived to the lowest common denominator and justify it by saying you see it in other cities.

Canberra was meant to be a special city. A garden city. A place that learned from the mistakes of other more crowded cities.

Crace and other new suburbs like it are symptomatic of us as a city on giving up on what makes us special.

I’ve just spent the best part of $800k on a new place in Gungahlin. I had plenty of choice, but the choice that was made (mostly by the missus) was a new build in Gungahlin. (Springbank Rise estate in Casey).

For that money we could have brought an older place with a bigger yard, done it up a bit and lived happily, but the (right) decision for us and our family was Gungahlin.

As I mentioned earlier our new place we went double story so we did end up with some yard, about the same if not more than our current house in Dunlop, but only because we went double story. When I brought Dunlop as a single guy I thought it was small, especially having grown up in an 1100m2 block in Macgregor. But it, the yard turned out to be ample for our needs, and I am sure the bigger house with yard will be ample for our family, which includes two under 5’s.

Coming to a suburb near you:
https://www.wilsonparking.com.au/park/2256_Burbury-Close-Car-Park_Burbury-Close-Barton

dungfungus dungfungus 8:01 am 12 Aug 15

Maya123 said :

dungfungus said :

farq said :

JC said :

For sure these suburbs are not for all, that is for sure, but clearly people are buying and building so voting with their feet.

&

beebee said :

The suburb is fall intents and purposes a mass of apartment/unit living. Seriously, neighbour proximity is marginal and what backyard? But at the end of the day no one is holding a gun to people’s heads, they clearly are happy with such living.

As far as I’m concerned Crace lies somewhere between FOMO and District 9.

It’s no wonder that people buy it when it’s the only option. Canberra suburban development has sunken to a point where people just have no option but to buy into bad developments. With the amount of money they are spending it’s no wonder they justify it and claim they like being on small blocks (seriously who prefers a block half the size of the minimum we grew up with?).

I agree with rubaiyat’s excellent post. I especially agree with the observation that in most cases the drive that makes people build such oversized houses is a craving for status. I’d like to add it’s also a lack of class and taste.

When friends who left Canberra 15 years ago come back to visit family and see old friends (me) their favorite topic of discussion is how Canberra seems to have given up on all the things that made it special. How we have dived to the lowest common denominator and justify it by saying you see it in other cities.

Canberra was meant to be a special city. A garden city. A place that learned from the mistakes of other more crowded cities.

Crace and other new suburbs like it are symptomatic of us as a city on giving up on what makes us special.

“Canberra was meant to be a special city. A garden city. A place that learned from the mistakes of other more crowded cities.”
Very true; and under-grounding as many power lines and other services that are carried by poles in other cities is part of that garden.
That will all end in 2018 when the ugly wire-scape that is necessary to support an unnecessary 100 year old technology starts up.

“under-grounding as many power lines and other services that are carried by poles in other cities”

Wherever I have lived in Canberra, all the lines have been above ground with poles.

Well, you won’t mind the transition of the other areas to look the same as where you have always lived, will you?

gbates gbates 10:45 pm 11 Aug 15

I’ve been resisting the temptation to comment here but I just can’t take it anymore….

Southmouth said :

I feel sorry for the children who will never know the joys of backyard cricket.

I live in a suburb full of big backyards and there’s cricket balls flying around everywhere. I can’t even go outside any more because of the cricket games. Wait, yes I can. With around two children per family nobody’s playing cricket in their back yards. I often see groups of children playing cricket at the park though. As for the OP’s comment about space for a dog, how often do you see dogs walking themselves around the backyard? They just stay in the same two or three places and wait for you to get home to let them inside or take them out.

vintage123 said :

Why not triple glazing?

Why not 16 sheets of glass and a three-inch sheet of lead for that extra-insulated feeling? The truth is that you often get a better return on your investment from other energy efficiency measures. Building codes are performance based – the government tells you how well the house has to perform, not how to achieve it.

dungfungus said :

The same mindset prevails with our civic leaders who want to ignore the fact that we have the best and most accessible road system in the world and replace it with a hundred year old mass transit network that simply is not needed nor applicable for a large provincial town like Canberra. I guess that means it is “not sustainable” as well. Buzz words are important in Canberra

The roads are good but the attitudes preferring complete car dependence are absolutely disgusting. Has anyone seen the way the traffic piles up along the likes of Hindmarsh and Northbourne every morning? Traffic like this in a “town” of under 400k suggests something needs to change. Continuing the addiction to ultra-low density housing where people are spread out to every corner of the ACT and nobody can go anywhere or do anything (besides backyard cricket, of course) without driving vast distances and clogging up the streets in the inner suburbs is beyond unsustainable – it’s plain stupid.

agent_clone said :

Actually, denser living in which the shops/schools etc are closer with better public transport, making the cities more walkable has been shown to improve fitness in people as people no longer need to have cars, or no longer need to use them as frequently and tend to walk more.

My wife read this comment and presumed that I wrote it, up until this bit:

agent_clone said :

Personally I don’t consider my house overly large (95m2) but it is on a small block. I did consider separate title terrace houses (I didn’t want to have to deal with a body corporate), however the ones in my price bracket that I saw when i was looking did not appeal to me (I was looking for specific rooms sizes for particular rooms, for example a lounge big enough such that you could have varying configurations for furniture, or a lounge/dining area big enough such that you can comfortably fit a 6 seater dining table, and a lounge).

We’re going down the terrace house route. 92m2 house on 200m2 separate title block in Coombs – a short bike ride to the city, eventually there will be a local shop in walking distance. Enough space for a vegetable garden and enough time to look after it. It will be a nice change from curating the grounds in the giant backyard we never use then going inside to freeze all night. I can only assume that it wasn’t cold in Canberra in the sixites and seventies since they didn’t build houses with any ability to retain heat. The new house has north-facing living areas, houses attached on both sides to keep our house warm and has to at least be built to a reasonable standard of thermal comfort. I’m hopeful.

farq said :

Personally I’ve given up on Canberra learning from the mistakes of others.

I can’t speak for every city but I am certain that the boundless urban sprawl of Perth, in the running for the longest city in the world, is a mistake that should be learned from. I’m no fan of the woeful incompetence of the ACT government but they are probably on the right track with urban planning.

Maya123 Maya123 10:07 pm 11 Aug 15

dungfungus said :

farq said :

JC said :

For sure these suburbs are not for all, that is for sure, but clearly people are buying and building so voting with their feet.

&

beebee said :

The suburb is fall intents and purposes a mass of apartment/unit living. Seriously, neighbour proximity is marginal and what backyard? But at the end of the day no one is holding a gun to people’s heads, they clearly are happy with such living.

As far as I’m concerned Crace lies somewhere between FOMO and District 9.

It’s no wonder that people buy it when it’s the only option. Canberra suburban development has sunken to a point where people just have no option but to buy into bad developments. With the amount of money they are spending it’s no wonder they justify it and claim they like being on small blocks (seriously who prefers a block half the size of the minimum we grew up with?).

I agree with rubaiyat’s excellent post. I especially agree with the observation that in most cases the drive that makes people build such oversized houses is a craving for status. I’d like to add it’s also a lack of class and taste.

When friends who left Canberra 15 years ago come back to visit family and see old friends (me) their favorite topic of discussion is how Canberra seems to have given up on all the things that made it special. How we have dived to the lowest common denominator and justify it by saying you see it in other cities.

Canberra was meant to be a special city. A garden city. A place that learned from the mistakes of other more crowded cities.

Crace and other new suburbs like it are symptomatic of us as a city on giving up on what makes us special.

“Canberra was meant to be a special city. A garden city. A place that learned from the mistakes of other more crowded cities.”
Very true; and under-grounding as many power lines and other services that are carried by poles in other cities is part of that garden.
That will all end in 2018 when the ugly wire-scape that is necessary to support an unnecessary 100 year old technology starts up.

“under-grounding as many power lines and other services that are carried by poles in other cities”

Wherever I have lived in Canberra, all the lines have been above ground with poles.

dungfungus dungfungus 9:42 pm 11 Aug 15

farq said :

JC said :

For sure these suburbs are not for all, that is for sure, but clearly people are buying and building so voting with their feet.

&

beebee said :

The suburb is fall intents and purposes a mass of apartment/unit living. Seriously, neighbour proximity is marginal and what backyard? But at the end of the day no one is holding a gun to people’s heads, they clearly are happy with such living.

As far as I’m concerned Crace lies somewhere between FOMO and District 9.

It’s no wonder that people buy it when it’s the only option. Canberra suburban development has sunken to a point where people just have no option but to buy into bad developments. With the amount of money they are spending it’s no wonder they justify it and claim they like being on small blocks (seriously who prefers a block half the size of the minimum we grew up with?).

I agree with rubaiyat’s excellent post. I especially agree with the observation that in most cases the drive that makes people build such oversized houses is a craving for status. I’d like to add it’s also a lack of class and taste.

When friends who left Canberra 15 years ago come back to visit family and see old friends (me) their favorite topic of discussion is how Canberra seems to have given up on all the things that made it special. How we have dived to the lowest common denominator and justify it by saying you see it in other cities.

Canberra was meant to be a special city. A garden city. A place that learned from the mistakes of other more crowded cities.

Crace and other new suburbs like it are symptomatic of us as a city on giving up on what makes us special.

“Canberra was meant to be a special city. A garden city. A place that learned from the mistakes of other more crowded cities.”
Very true; and under-grounding as many power lines and other services that are carried by poles in other cities is part of that garden.
That will all end in 2018 when the ugly wire-scape that is necessary to support an unnecessary 100 year old technology starts up.

JC JC 8:40 pm 11 Aug 15

farq said :

JC said :

For sure these suburbs are not for all, that is for sure, but clearly people are buying and building so voting with their feet.

&

beebee said :

The suburb is fall intents and purposes a mass of apartment/unit living. Seriously, neighbour proximity is marginal and what backyard? But at the end of the day no one is holding a gun to people’s heads, they clearly are happy with such living.

As far as I’m concerned Crace lies somewhere between FOMO and District 9.

It’s no wonder that people buy it when it’s the only option. Canberra suburban development has sunken to a point where people just have no option but to buy into bad developments. With the amount of money they are spending it’s no wonder they justify it and claim they like being on small blocks (seriously who prefers a block half the size of the minimum we grew up with?).

I agree with rubaiyat’s excellent post. I especially agree with the observation that in most cases the drive that makes people build such oversized houses is a craving for status. I’d like to add it’s also a lack of class and taste.

When friends who left Canberra 15 years ago come back to visit family and see old friends (me) their favorite topic of discussion is how Canberra seems to have given up on all the things that made it special. How we have dived to the lowest common denominator and justify it by saying you see it in other cities.

Canberra was meant to be a special city. A garden city. A place that learned from the mistakes of other more crowded cities.

Crace and other new suburbs like it are symptomatic of us as a city on giving up on what makes us special.

I’ve just spent the best part of $800k on a new place in Gungahlin. I had plenty of choice, but the choice that was made (mostly by the missus) was a new build in Gungahlin. (Springbank Rise estate in Casey).

For that money we could have brought an older place with a bigger yard, done it up a bit and lived happily, but the (right) decision for us and our family was Gungahlin.

As I mentioned earlier our new place we went double story so we did end up with some yard, about the same if not more than our current house in Dunlop, but only because we went double story. When I brought Dunlop as a single guy I thought it was small, especially having grown up in an 1100m2 block in Macgregor. But it, the yard turned out to be ample for our needs, and I am sure the bigger house with yard will be ample for our family, which includes two under 5’s.

farq farq 8:37 pm 11 Aug 15

The thing that makes me feel Canberra is doomed is that suburbs like this have come to pass under a Labor government. Who else can we vote for?

What alternative party is out there that will reverse the decline in the standard of suburban development?

If we vote Liberal, they will probably allow a free for all and existing suburbs will end up nothing but duel occupancy, which in turn will allow the existing parts of Canberra to drop to the same standards (or worse) as Gungahlin. Are there any parties/candidates that will stand up for what made Canberra unique?

Has the time passed in which we cared about making Canberra special? Are we just destined to be a smaller more isolated copy of the outer western fringes of Sydney?

Personally I’ve given up on Canberra learning from the mistakes of others… I’ve bought a huge block near Yass which I intend on building on in a few years.

If I can’t plan a nice quite suburban retirement in Canberra, I’m going to plan it out of town. I’ll leave Canberra to those who are happy to shit on the legacy of our bush capital. People who want to live in their McMansions 2m from their equally as clueless neighbors.

farq farq 7:05 pm 11 Aug 15

JC said :

For sure these suburbs are not for all, that is for sure, but clearly people are buying and building so voting with their feet.

&

beebee said :

The suburb is fall intents and purposes a mass of apartment/unit living. Seriously, neighbour proximity is marginal and what backyard? But at the end of the day no one is holding a gun to people’s heads, they clearly are happy with such living.

As far as I’m concerned Crace lies somewhere between FOMO and District 9.

It’s no wonder that people buy it when it’s the only option. Canberra suburban development has sunken to a point where people just have no option but to buy into bad developments. With the amount of money they are spending it’s no wonder they justify it and claim they like being on small blocks (seriously who prefers a block half the size of the minimum we grew up with?).

I agree with rubaiyat’s excellent post. I especially agree with the observation that in most cases the drive that makes people build such oversized houses is a craving for status. I’d like to add it’s also a lack of class and taste.

When friends who left Canberra 15 years ago come back to visit family and see old friends (me) their favorite topic of discussion is how Canberra seems to have given up on all the things that made it special. How we have dived to the lowest common denominator and justify it by saying you see it in other cities.

Canberra was meant to be a special city. A garden city. A place that learned from the mistakes of other more crowded cities.

Crace and other new suburbs like it are symptomatic of us as a city on giving up on what makes us special.

MERC600 MERC600 2:30 pm 11 Aug 15

Thanks ever so much re the advantages of double glazing ,,, and what all.
Now has anyone come across the over 55 joint built by Goodwin retirement people in Crace; possibly with/without double glazing.

JC JC 11:32 am 11 Aug 15

Dame Canberra said :

beebee said :

As far as I’m concerned Crace lies somewhere between FOMO and District 9.

Ha! Agreed. Though I think most newer suburbs, not just Crace, feel the same way.

Of all the newer suburbs Crace is actually one of the better ones. The estate requriements are a lot stricter than many of the estates developed by LDA. The Springbank Rise section of Casey is another where the developer has put a lot of thought and rules into their estate requirements.

For sure these suburbs are not for all, that is for sure, but clearly people are buying and building so voting with their feet.

Nilrem Nilrem 10:04 am 11 Aug 15

rubaiyat said :

agent_clone said :

Actually, denser living in which the shops/schools etc are closer with better public transport, making the cities more walkable has been shown to improve fitness in people as people no longer need to have cars, or no longer need to use them as frequently and tend to walk more. Personally I don’t consider my house overly large (95m2) but it is on a small block. I did consider separate title terrace houses (I didn’t want to have to deal with a body corporate), however the ones in my price bracket that I saw when i was looking did not appeal to me (I was looking for specific rooms sizes for particular rooms, for example a lounge big enough such that you could have varying configurations for furniture, or a lounge/dining area big enough such that you can comfortably fit a 6 seater dining table, and a lounge).

I agree that a lot of new houses have terrible designs and should really have things like double glazing and better insulation, I don’t know that older houses necessarily have better ones though… The older houses also generally have little to no insulation so the newer ones are somewhat better in that regard.

We actually are on the same page. My point is that people are moving to far out developments in a fools’ pursuit of a past lifestyle. All they are doing is condemning themselves and their children to a life in cars.

Greed, materialism and a craving for status is inflating the house size that they are cramming onto the ever tinier remote blocks, which in turn is increasing their debt and the need to feed that debt with a more stressful lifestyle that robs them of the opportunity to enjoy the “freedom” they thought they had bought.

Best is the richer lifestyle of a compact city, giving more time for family and recreation instead of time wasted driving, providing communal space, both urban and parkland, rather than unused private space.

They can always escape to the surrounding countryside, which will actually be within reach because it won’t be buried under bitumen and suburbia to the far distant horizon.

What you said.

Dame Canberra Dame Canberra 10:02 am 11 Aug 15

beebee said :

As far as I’m concerned Crace lies somewhere between FOMO and District 9.

Ha! Agreed. Though I think most newer suburbs, not just Crace, feel the same way.

beebee beebee 9:51 am 11 Aug 15

The suburb is fall intents and purposes a mass of apartment/unit living. Seriously, neighbour proximity is marginal and what backyard? But at the end of the day no one is holding a gun to people’s heads, they clearly are happy with such living.

As far as I’m concerned Crace lies somewhere between FOMO and District 9.

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