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First i-MiEV joins the ACT Government fleet

By johnboy 23 February 2012 68

miev

The Chief Minister is celebrating the arrival of the ACT Government’s first electric car:

“Territory and Municipal Services (TAMS) has welcomed a new Mitsubishi i MiEV electric car into its fleet and demonstrates our commitment to working towards reducing the environmental impacts associated with conducting business through the use of sustainable transport,” the Chief Minister said.

“This includes reducing the number of vehicles in its fleet and replacing vehicles with fuel efficient, four cylinder and environmentally friendly models including hybrid vehicles.

The Mitsubishi i MiEV was selected following a short trial and replaces a conventional petrol driven pool car. It produces zero greenhouse gas emissions and travels up to 100 km between charges.

While the vehicle will use standard electricity, the trial will be used to determine how we can use 100 per cent renewable energy to power the fleet in the future.

Charge points are being installed within the Macarthur House car park where TAMS is located. These will provide convenient daytime recharging when the car is not in use. Overnight charging facilities are provided at the TAMS depot where the car is garaged to ensure it is ready for use each day.

More info on this car is on the Mitsubishi website.

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First i-MiEV joins the ACT Government fleet
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farnarkler 6:53 pm 28 Feb 12

Remember these cars are for the ACT government not for fanging around the Top Gear track!! Housing ACT use vile and oh so boring Hyundai i20s and i30s to go daily from Belconnen to Tuggeranong, Civic, etc so they need something economical. If they have electric cars and, for some reason the electric car(s) aren’t charged overnight, they can’t nip up to the service station up behind Belconnen mall and do a quick fill up like they can with petrol and could with diesel.

devils_advocate 3:57 pm 28 Feb 12

Deref said :

Have you driven one recently? I’ve driven a few, and “fantastic” is the word I’d use. Not the same type of response as petrol, but when you get used to using them properly they beat petrol hands-down in my book.

Yep, driven quite a few, tbh my beef is more with the new generation of deisels being used in hatchbacks and commuter cars rather than the current generation of larger capacity turbo diesels in the more traditional 4×4’s and utility/light commercials.

With the non-commercials (ie commuters) the deisel formula of big stroke/bore doesn’t really lend itself to high-rpm operation and therefore is less fun to drive with a manual gearbox, and I don’t like being forced to shift mid-corner, I like to select the bottom of the gear and then punch through the sweepers in that gear. Also while the sound has gotten quieter (at least on the inside) they still can’t replicate that nice high-pitched scream of an oversquare 4, or the burble of a v6 or the roar of an I6. Finally the block castings/design usually mean that the engine itself is significantly heavier than the equivalent petrol, which of course stuffs up the handling.

And since we can’t have any actual fun on the road any more the aural accompanyment, handling and cornering is one of the few legal joys of peddling a car on public roads.

Deref 2:28 pm 28 Feb 12

devils_advocate said :

VYBerlinaV8_is_back said :

Agreed. Modern diesels are fantastic, and more people would buy them if they could over their prejudice and try them out.

Well I dunno about “fantastic”. Less bad than they once were, certainlty, but with the exception of some audi le-mans specials, most fall far short of “fantastic”.

Have you driven one recently? I’ve driven a few, and “fantastic” is the word I’d use. Not the same type of response as petrol, but when you get used to using them properly they beat petrol hands-down in my book.

devils_advocate 1:27 pm 28 Feb 12

VYBerlinaV8_is_back said :

Agreed. Modern diesels are fantastic, and more people would buy them if they could over their prejudice and try them out.

Well I dunno about “fantastic”. Less bad than they once were, certainlty, but with the exception of some audi le-mans specials, most fall far short of “fantastic”.

KB1971 1:10 pm 28 Feb 12

KB1971 said :

Postalgeek said :

qbngeek said :

Here is something that the owners of EVs and Prius’s are never keen to answer – How much more environmental damage (including emissions) was done in just the manufacturing of your batteries over what damage and emissions will be caused in the manufacturing and full lifetime of a diesel car?

I know the answer, but are you willing to admit it? Your car is more harmful to the environment than most large 4WDs and all small to medium cars.

I don’t own an EV or Prius, but I’m curious to see the answer. Care to cite it?

There was an engineering article from a few years ago that compared the carbon offsets & environmental impacts of a Prius & a Dodge Ram. I cant find it at the moment but if I trip over it I will post it here.

Here is an article refuting the original but you will get the idea (I can’t find the original), fairly typical of the two sides of the greenhous debate: http://www.thecarconnection.com/tips-article/1010861_prius-versus-hummer-exploding-the-myth

KB1971 1:00 pm 28 Feb 12

KB1971 said :

devils_advocate said :

KB1971 said :

It is a great little car, zippy off the mark and is quite comfortable at 90km/h, I have driven it in the rain & it is fine. The thing is, if you are worried about on road grip & the tyres are not up to it, get better tyres.

There are two problems with this. 1) if it only goes at 90kph comfortably, then by definition it’s a second car. And all the embodied carbon that goes with that. A small or mid-size car (eg lancer, corolla) could be used by a single or a family on it’s own.
2) The thin tires are probably low-rolling resistance, high silica compound tires designed to reduce energy consumption and give longer range. Changing the tires to get some semblance of grip/steering would most likely significantly reduce what is already a very short range.

I didnt say its top speed was 90km/h, it was an example given to show that it is quite comfortable at the upper limits of our maximum speed limit.

By definition it doesnt have to be a second car, in Canberra it may get caught short on range but if you did not use it for travelling outside the city then it is all you would need. Nor did I say it was a family car, there are plenty of cars as you suggested. I just said it was a good city car that can be used for the majority of stuff that you do in your everyday life. Nope its not suited to every application but not every car is.

As far as the tyres are concerned, they are adequate for the job asked of them, the car is not high performance nor is it high load carrying. The comment by the SMH about them lacks substance as the dimensions, speed & load ratings are no different to those supplied on a Gets or a Jazz.

I might add, to all you haters that actually have not driven one or tired to live with it, have a go you might be surprised.

KB1971 12:59 pm 28 Feb 12

devils_advocate said :

KB1971 said :

It is a great little car, zippy off the mark and is quite comfortable at 90km/h, I have driven it in the rain & it is fine. The thing is, if you are worried about on road grip & the tyres are not up to it, get better tyres.

There are two problems with this. 1) if it only goes at 90kph comfortably, then by definition it’s a second car. And all the embodied carbon that goes with that. A small or mid-size car (eg lancer, corolla) could be used by a single or a family on it’s own.
2) The thin tires are probably low-rolling resistance, high silica compound tires designed to reduce energy consumption and give longer range. Changing the tires to get some semblance of grip/steering would most likely significantly reduce what is already a very short range.

I didnt say its top speed was 90km/h, it was an example given to show that it is quite comfortable at the upper limits of our maximum speed limit.

By definition it doesnt have to be a second car, in Canberra it may get caught short on range but if you did not use it for travelling outside the city then it is all you would need. Nor did I say it was a family car, there are plenty of cars as you suggested. I just said it was a good city car that can be used for the majority of stuff that you do in your everyday life. Nope its not suited to every application but not every car is.

As far as the tyres are concerned, they are adequate for the job asked of them, the car is not high performance nor is it high load carrying. The comment by the SMH about them lacks substance as the dimensions, speed & load ratings are no different to those supplied on a Gets or a Jazz.

VYBerlinaV8_is_back 12:49 pm 28 Feb 12

Thumper said :

Holden Caulfield said :

farnarkler said :

Buy diesels. Slow and shuddery but very fuel efficient and much cheaper than the Mitsubishi.

You’re looking at the wrong diesels!

Golf GTD is just one example, although to be fair, it’s not “much cheaper” than the i-MiEV.

I drove a deisel golf around England in 2010. It was cheap and went like a cut cat.

Agreed. Modern diesels are fantastic, and more people would buy them if they could over their prejudice and try them out. They also use significantly less fuel than equivalent sized petrol vehicles.

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