Skip to content Skip to main navigation

Community

Donating over $1.5 million to 350
local Community Groups each year

Greens push for higher density housing

By johnboy - 11 March 2009 32

The Greens Spokesperson for Planning, Caroline Le Couteur, has announced that she wants the new North Weston development to have higher density housing.

    Key recommendations of the submission include:

    — Ensuring housing is medium-density, given the demand for housing in prime central locations, as it is close to Cooleman Court and also handy to Woden, Barton and Civic;
    — ensuring housing and block orientation are highly efficient, including block and building planning, materials and appliances;
    — protecting potential Pink-tailed Worm Lizard habitat, and ensuring landscaping protects these values;
    making the areas cat containment zones;
    — make public transport accessible from the outset, including ensuring that the public bus route runs nearby and cycle lanes are accessible.

Do we want to be throwing up higher density housing in new developments? Or is more infill of desirable older suburbs the answer, and bugger “preserving the character” for the lucky few?

What’s Your opinion?


Post a comment
Please login to post your comments, or connect with
32 Responses to
Greens push for higher density housing
Gungahlin Al 3:15 pm 11 Mar 09

PreciousLilywhite said :

Medium – High density living in outer suburbs is not desirable and it just doesn’t work.
The last thing we want to see is another co*kup in planning that results in housing abominations like Gungahlin (sorry Al), adding heaps more traffic to an already chocked parkway.
Let them infill areas like Forrest & Barton so more people can enjoy the benefits of inner city living like riding a bike to work and using already existing public transport.
People who choose live in the outer areas enjoy the space, peace & quiet.

No offence taken PLW. I am on the record many times as saying that the way the LDA and ACTPLA (and the GDA before them) went about the Gungahlin town centre had some serious flaws. The “main street” approach has led to a town centre (I think) far better than any of the other shopping centre-dominated inward-looking centres around Canberra. But the immediate surrounding of the town centre with the relatively low density of twon houses is silly.

We have argued that there needs to be a transition from the core through higher density, to medium density. The flip side of this increased density closer in, is that there should be blocks that are larger (just a bit, please?) in the suburbs themselves. Enough to have somewhere for the kids to play and to plant a tree or two…

The arguments against “sprawl” have gone entirely too far, and been hijacked by the development industry as an excuse for obscene yields.

I think this is what Caroline is getting at, with the additional spin off being that the increased inner density may allow more of the environmentally sensitive areas to be preserved instead of sacrificed.

Remember: Molonglo will have a Dickson-scale retail core, and it will become another of Canberra’s satellite centres – just not a key employment base in its own right, owning to being nearer to Woden, Civic and Belco. I think therefore that what Caroline is proposing is quite reasonable.

R. Slicker 3:09 pm 11 Mar 09

“The pink-tailed worm lizard”?

I suppose the earless dragon was out to lunch when Caroline wrote the press release.

kobez_outlaw 2:43 pm 11 Mar 09

High density is good. Why build more sprawl? That would make the situation for public transport harder than it already is. Gunghalin may look ugly but in order for a city to function properly it needs its suburbs to have at least medium density. If you want to live in low density don’t expect to live in a capital city, move to the country. The inner city suburbs like Braddon, Campbell, Manuka and Kingston etc should have very high density units and appartments. The majority of office towers should be in Civic, screw all this sprawl, having offices in Woden, Belconnen is dumb, centralization is the key. That’s why Civic’s height restrictions are a joke and are a burden on this cities oppurtunity to prosper.

chrispy 2:41 pm 11 Mar 09

I was listening to “life matters” the other day and they had a bloke who suggested that Australia needs to reduce the size of our front yards to zero and increase the size of our backyards. That way we can have higher density living while keeping the outdoor culture we have. Sounds good to me, how many people have BBQ’s in their front yards? None that I know.

Clown Killer 2:26 pm 11 Mar 09

This is another example of eco-mentalists advocating government interference where it is not needed. Why not let the suburb develop according to what the Canberra real estate market wants? Surely it would make sense to develop the land to an eager market rather than pedalling some hair-shirt fantasy on home-buyers.

Ultimately, if more people want to buy into that market, then over time larger lots will be sub-divided and housing density will rise as the market trades off ‘space’ against location in a way that will be far more responsive to real demand than regulation could ever hope to be.

Interestingly, I read in an unrelated article that the Molonglo suburbs will have a number of gas-fired power generation facilities embedded into the urban areas – in my mind that creates an opening for a new form of urban pest: the NIMFBYOIGATMTM or Not In My Future Back Yard Once I Get Around to Moving to Molonglo …

PreciousLilywhite 2:00 pm 11 Mar 09

“How about we go for urban redevelopment of the inner urban zones and quality housing development in the outer fringe.”

Agreed. It would be nice to see a development with some interesting architecture on decent sized blocks. Gleneagles with better streets please.

Ooooh….and where will the children go to school, Stanhopeless? You just closed the two closest schools (Rivett & Weston).

chewy14 1:50 pm 11 Mar 09

It is closer to the city, than most of the Woden Valley. It is about as close to Civic as Garran, and will be surrounded by newer suburbs once the Molonglo Valley Development starts.
It is hardly out in the Boondocks.

johnboy 1:46 pm 11 Mar 09

The coastal farmlands of the Illawarra still get a CityRail service.

Tempestas 1:43 pm 11 Mar 09

It certainly raises the interesting point that many of the older, dare I say wealthier, suburbs like Reid, Campbell, Forrest, and Deakin have had no-where near the medium to higer density development that Braddon, Turner, Kingston have. If we are going to build a sustainable city, then maybe taking some of those massive blocks and forcing multi-unit development there might assist, after all is that what lease-hold is for. I for one would never care if the words “Dress circle location” were not seen again on a real estate ad.

Public transpost is always going to be tricky in a town with the urban density of coastal farmlands.

dexi 1:37 pm 11 Mar 09

Chewy which lot of “inner suburbs” are you talking about? Maybe when the cotter is developed North Weston might be a very little more central. But I doubt it.

chewy14 1:19 pm 11 Mar 09

Have a look at the suburb she is talking about people.
North Weston is not an outer suburb. It will be closer to the city than a lot of “Inner Suburbs”, and once the Molonglo development starts will actually be very central.

neanderthalsis 1:11 pm 11 Mar 09

Great idea, higher density developments on the outer suburban fringe. Lets recreate the social disfunction of some western sydney suburbs, or Logan in Brisbane with medium density housing, no local job prospects, a mix of public housing tennants and poor access to public transport (lets face it, that’s one area the local Junta can never seem to get right)…

How about we go for urban redevelopment of the inner urban zones and quality housing development in the outer fringe.

Oh, and the pink tailed worm lizard sounds like a species with a PR problem.

miz 1:11 pm 11 Mar 09

Couldn’t agree more. Medium density is for the inner city. Peace, quiet and space is the suburban dream.

PreciousLilywhite 1:04 pm 11 Mar 09

I’d like to know what sort of environmental housing plan they have for dealing with bushfires?

PreciousLilywhite 12:59 pm 11 Mar 09

Medium – High density living in outer suburbs is not desirable and it just doesn’t work.
The last thing we want to see is another co*kup in planning that results in housing abominations like Gungahlin (sorry Al), adding heaps more traffic to an already chocked parkway.
Let them infill areas like Forrest & Barton so more people can enjoy the benefits of inner city living like riding a bike to work and using already existing public transport.
People who choose live in the outer areas enjoy the space, peace & quiet.

1 2 3

Related Articles

CBR Tweets

Sign up to our newsletter

Top
Copyright © 2017 Riot ACT Holdings Pty Ltd. All rights reserved.
www.the-riotact.com | www.b2bmagazine.com.au

Search across the site