Gungahlin traffic woes

Xtra 19 April 2016 91

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Is anyone else finding the daily commute out of Gungahlin difficult?

My concerns are, as the population of the district increases the amount of traffic on the roads will only increase. Horse Park Dr, parts of Flemington Rd are single lane – not sufficient for the morning volumes of traffic.  Compared to Tuggeranong and Belconnen, Gungahlin does not seem to have a road network capable of dispersing traffic at peak times.

What measures will be put in place when the light rail gets underway? Flemington Road is likely to be further constrained for quite some time – has anyone in government considered measures for dealing with the light rail and traffic leaving Gungahlin?


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rubaiyat rubaiyat 8:19 am 30 Mar 15

BenjaminRose1991 said :

Here are my suggestions on improving the traffic flow in and out of Gungahlin and between Gungahlin and Belconnen. While putting this topic back on topic.

I put these in the “Should’ve been done twenty years ago” category.

* Duplicate Gundaroo Drive and William Slim Drive.
* Duplicate Horse Park Drive from Gundaroo Drive towards the Majura Parkway (formerly Majura Rd)

Convert these roundabouts and intersections to a “Seagull Intersection” http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seagull_intersection

Local examples in Wiki page.

* Gungahlin Drive intersections with Sandford St, Well Station Dr, and Kosciuszko Ave (southern intersection)
* Horse Park Drive intersections with Anthony Rolfe Ave, Mapleton Ave, and Well Station Dr.
* William Slim Dr intersections with Chuculba Cres, Owen Dixon Dr, and Baldwin Dr.

Add merging lanes (ending in “form one lane”) after intersections heading southbound on Gungahlin Drive coming out from Well Station Dr and Sandford St intersections.

A huge and expensive task but it would PERMANENTLY improve flows and reduce the impact of the tram line on Gungahlin traffic.

Hopefully my extensive suggestions make sense 😐

Sounds a lot like all the “Solutions” tried everywhere else for the last 100+ years:

1) Build more roads at huge expense so people can turn them into parking lots.

2) Build some more at even greater expense.

3) When that doesn’t work, build even more

4) To pretend they don’t really exist despite you can still see, hear and smell them, try and hide them behind 100s of kilometres of 3 – 5m high concrete walls

5) Ignore that each road fills up the next and ultimately the parking lots at the end of the line

6) Ignore that you are using over a tone of metal and a lot of fuel to move usually only one person, every now and then.

Problem solved.

7) No its not. See 3)

TFarquahar TFarquahar 6:29 am 30 Mar 15

Whoa! people………..Haven’t you all seen or heard the ads? Drive or ride – same rights, same responsibilities? Oh please. If the moron on his bike making car noises wasn’t enough to make you sick then a small amount of logical thought regarding the assertion Drive or ride – same rights, same responsibilities would.

Let me explain. To drive a motor vehicle lawfully on the road you are required to pass a driving skills and knowledge test, eyesight test, pay your registration and third party insurance, maintain your motor vehicle to comply with the legislated standards, carry your driver licence, display registraiton plates on your vehicle…………….the list could go on.

To ride a bicycle on public roads you are required to do well……………nothing, pay nothing, not be identifiable, not required to carry any identification,………………..the list could go on.

So, Same rights, same responsibilities? I think not.

BenjaminRose1991 BenjaminRose1991 6:18 pm 29 Mar 15

Here are my suggestions on improving the traffic flow in and out of Gungahlin and between Gungahlin and Belconnen. While putting this topic back on topic.

I put these in the “Should’ve been done twenty years ago” category.

* Duplicate Gundaroo Drive and William Slim Drive.
* Duplicate Horse Park Drive from Gundaroo Drive towards the Majura Parkway (formerly Majura Rd)

Convert these roundabouts and intersections to a “Seagull Intersection” http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seagull_intersection Local examples in Wiki page.

* Gungahlin Drive intersections with Sandford St, Well Station Dr, and Kosciuszko Ave (southern intersection)
* Horse Park Drive intersections with Anthony Rolfe Ave, Mapleton Ave, and Well Station Dr.
* William Slim Dr intersections with Chuculba Cres, Owen Dixon Dr, and Baldwin Dr.

Add merging lanes (ending in “form one lane”) after intersections heading southbound on Gungahlin Drive coming out from Well Station Dr and Sandford St intersections.

A huge and expensive task but it would PERMANENTLY improve flows and reduce the impact of the tram line on Gungahlin traffic.

Hopefully my extensive suggestions make sense 😐

carnardly carnardly 3:55 pm 29 Mar 15

BlowMeDown said :

Motor vehicle drivers derive little to no, and even negative, benefit from sharing the roads with cyclists. Cyclists are not required to be licensed or even competent, do not need to have their bicycles registered as road-worthy, or to be insured for damage to either themselves or others.

.

If all the cyclists organised a Drive to Work day, every motorist out there would notice the traffic going slower than usual. For every bike on the road it’s one less car on the road in front of you holding you up at the lights.

carnardly carnardly 3:51 pm 29 Mar 15

dungfungus said :

Care to comment why the cyclists use the ambulance/ED services disproportionately more that motorists?

C’mon – we all know the answer. Canberra drivers can’t frigging drive and run over them. That’s why. How can a driver come up on the right hand side of a cyclist draw level, then left hook them and say SMIDSY… happens every day of the week in this town. Even in broad daylight…

KB1971 KB1971 8:28 am 29 Mar 15

dungfungus said :

Postalgeek said :

dungfungus said :

A lot more people use cars as their main means of travel so of course more will die on the road.

How does that support your original assertion that “cyclists are using the ambulance services a lot more than motorists are”?

Add the word “disproportionately” which I used and you have answered your own question.

Well, cmon, show us the stats?

rosscoact rosscoact 7:00 am 29 Mar 15

dungfungus said :

Care to comment why the cyclists use the ambulance/ED services disproportionately more that motorists?

Eddie, I’ll lock in Cars and Gravity please

dungfungus dungfungus 10:59 pm 27 Mar 15

Postalgeek said :

dungfungus said :

A lot more people use cars as their main means of travel so of course more will die on the road.

How does that support your original assertion that “cyclists are using the ambulance services a lot more than motorists are”?

Add the word “disproportionately” which I used and you have answered your own question.

Postalgeek Postalgeek 6:25 pm 27 Mar 15

dungfungus said :

A lot more people use cars as their main means of travel so of course more will die on the road.

How does that support your original assertion that “cyclists are using the ambulance services a lot more than motorists are”?

dungfungus dungfungus 4:24 pm 27 Mar 15

Postalgeek said :

dungfungus said :

Postalgeek said :

wildturkeycanoe said :

Unfortunately, in time you will see the traffic woes creep from our roadways to our cycleways. The Commonwealth and Kings Avenue bridges are getting more and more choked up with cyclists, runners and sight-seers. The more people give up on driving their cars, the more they will clog up the transport routes that are available. Buses will be full and”path rage” will become a term familiar to the five o’clock news broadcasters.

Should that shift occur I guess a road lane would be allocated to cycles and ebikes 🙂

And cyclists don’t even pay the annual $16.60 Road Rescue Fee that car owners have to pay but cyclists are using the ambulance services a lot more that motorists are.

No, cyclists who aren’t also drivers don’t pay the annual $16.60, but then they don’t wear and damage the roads like cars or trucks while still contributing for construction and upkeep through tax. And they generally don’t leave a path of destruction, require fire units to attend or extensive mop up, or require emergency equipment like the Jaws of Life to extricate them from their bicycle.
As for ambulances, if someone, anyone, uses an ambulance they are charged for it. And you’ll have to stump up some evidence for the assertion that cyclists use ambulances more than motorists, given that, in NSW at any rate, motorists use hearses a lot more than cyclists, by a factor of at least 10. I doubt that figures are reversed when it comes to ambulances.

http://roadsafety.transport.nsw.gov.au/downloads/dynamic/nsw-road-toll-daily.pdf

A lot more people use cars as their main means of travel so of course more will die on the road.

Maya123 Maya123 3:38 pm 27 Mar 15

wildturkeycanoe said :

Maya123 said :

Maya123 said :

wildturkeycanoe said :

Maya123 said :

nemesisrocks said :

There’s a pretty easy solution to all your problems.

Don’t live in Gungahlin.

If being stuck in long lines of traffic, the slow drive to work and the bad public transport is something you are likely to complain about, DON’T buy in the outer suburbs. Lower your expectations for what you want in a house and live closer to work.

Maya123, there is a reason first home buyers don’t buy in Narrabundah or anywhere close to the city. It is approximately $300,000+. That’s the difference in price between a 3 bedroom house in the burbs and one in the old leaf-lined streets of central Canberra. If money grew on trees then yes your idea would be viable but availability is also another factor. There are only six 3 bedroom houses for sale presently in your neighborhood as opposed to sixteen in a selected western Belconnen suburb. Sure, apartments might be an alternative but priced accordingly at 3x what a bedroom is worth on the outskirts too.
If you want the land next door to your house developed into a multistory dwelling, preventing the morning sunshine from illuminating your backyard sanctuary and housing twenty noisy families whose children run around on the street because there is no yard to play in, then that is the kind of change you are suggesting. The A.C.T government wants to do this too, bring medium to high density housing to our inner city areas to bring people closer to work. Unfortunately, in time you will see the traffic woes creep from our roadways to our cycleways. The Commonwealth and Kings Avenue bridges are getting more and more choked up with cyclists, runners and sight-seers. The more people give up on driving their cars, the more they will clog up the transport routes that are available. Buses will be full and”path rage” will become a term familiar to the five o’clock news broadcasters.
If you think getting everyone onto bikes and walking is the answer, try cycling in Beijing. I have never been more scared of riding a bike as I did there. So many people on so narrow a pathway, handlebars inches from clipping one another….
Anyway, I’ve finished my coffee now so better wrap this up. For $300,000 less most people will put up with the traffic, enjoy their spacious backyard, en-suite, energy efficiency and the security of knowing their plumbing won’t need tearing up and replacing in the next few decades.

The house I bought in Narrabundah was the cheapest on the market in the whole of Canberra at that time. The new houses in the outer suburbs were more expensive. As for plumbing, yes I did replace the underground water pipe running from the metre to the house (after living in the house for some years). But I imagine that was a cheaper job than the wall that had to be pulled down in the new house next door to replace the leaking pipe in that. Even new houses can have shoddy work. Houses in Narrabundah are are not necessarily more expensive than houses in the outer suburbs even today. You sound just like the people who couldn’t imagine living without an ensuite in my day and wouldn’t dream of buying a house like the example below in Narrabundah. Yes, it’s small, but there was a family of five living before me in it. There was three of us. The most expensive winter electricity bill I had was about $600. Is your bill any less?
http://www.allhomes.com.au/ah/act/sale-residential/10-euroka-street-narrabundah-canberra/1316949303111

My house had three bedrooms; not two as in the example.

You just proved my point. Almost half a million for two bedrooms in Narrabundah when a 3 bed with ensuite in new suburb can be attained for just over $300k. That’s why people commute and families live on the outskirts. They need the extra rooms for the kids and can’t buy in inner city areas without spending more than they can afford.

The example of the two bedroom house I gave, also comes in three bedrooms and they generally sell for about the same price. It’s more about the land than the house. There are two and three bedroom Mallee style houses and two and three bedroom Bega style houses in Narrabundah. When they built them, there were not many designs. The one I gave looks like a Mallee design house to me. I think the Bega design houses are a bit better design.
Have you factored in the cost of the car, the petrol, etc. I just read “The annual NRMA vehicle survey has found that costs around $260 a week to run an average Australian Family car.” That’s $13,520 a year; more if the household has another car. Plus the travel time which you could be spending with your family? Do you have a choice of several schools within walking distance, so the children can walk to school (again no car needed)?
There are newish apartments with three bedrooms available for less than the example house. Some have a courtyard. Many families (maybe not Canberra) grow up in apartments. My first home as a child was a flat above shops.
Many factors of where a person lives is a personal choice and the lifestyle they want and are prepared, or not prepared to give up, even temporally. I chose to give up things to live closer to work, so as to have other advantages. Many other people are not willing, or can’t conceive, giving those things up.
The average house in Canberra is over $500,000 apparently, and the average first home about $400,000.

BlowMeDown BlowMeDown 3:28 pm 27 Mar 15

Maya123 said :

From the ACT Emergency Services website: http://esa.act.gov.au/actas/fees-and-charges/

“ACT Residents travelling in a motor vehicle are covered for emergency ambulance services within the ACT through the road rescue fee levied on vehicle registration. This does not cover incidents with personal liability of injury or damage to a third party.”

I’ve thought further on this. This means that the passengers in the car, who have not paid this fee, are also covered, while a person cycling who might have been hit by the car, is not covered. The passengers don’t pay this fee, because there’s one fee for a car with only driver, and the fee is not increased when there are passengers, so the fee is in effect only paid by the driver. The others get a free ride regarding this insurance, so to speak.

All vehicle drivers are required to have compulsory third party insurance, which covers “third parties” like “the other guy”.

The item on my rego that I object to is not the Fire and Rescue fee, but the new one: “Lifetime Care and Support Levy”. It seems designed to make motor vehicle owners alone pay for the inevitable consequences of foolishly allowing motor vehicles, cyclists and pedestrians to play together in confined spaces.

JC JC 3:06 pm 27 Mar 15

shellcase said :

G’afternoon JC and all, yes I have seen the plans et al. My point being why build a car park at Mitchell? Are there not already morning traffic jams along Gungahlin and Flemington roads? Why get into a traffic jam to change to another mode of tpt to avoid a traffic jam?

The train starts at Gungahlin Town Centre; are those living in Gungahlin who must first drive to a train station meant to drive from, say, Moncrieff/Casey/Jacka, to Mitchell before catching the train? Why bother? That’s roughly half the distance to Civic or Russell, may as well stay in the car.

I’ll bet the value of a weekly train fare the ACTION system won’t be anywhere near revitalised to provide feeder services from outlying suburbs to the station.

Don’t disagree there should be a park and ride in the town centre too. But look at a map and you can see why the location has been choosen. It is the most central location in the whole of Gungahlin.

The way the town centre was built is a mess, and traffic around there will only get worse. Mitchell lies within easy access of Gungahlin Drive, Flemmington Road and Horse Park Drive, so logical.

As to why you would change, simple really. The areas around the City, Russell and the Parl triangle do not have endless amounts of land for more and more carparks, nor do the roads closer to these locations have endless capacity either. By having park and rides in places like Mitchell and a a reasonable public transport system you lessen then need for this very expensive infrastructure. Sure roads in an around Gungahlin will need to improve, that is a given.

Anyway to use your argument, why would anyone in Sydney drive to a train station only to change mode when they may as well drive all the way into the city? Never mind of course the congestion, lack of parking and cost of parking. The same issues do very much apply here too.

shellcase shellcase 2:45 pm 27 Mar 15

G’afternoon JC and all, yes I have seen the plans et al. My point being why build a car park at Mitchell? Are there not already morning traffic jams along Gungahlin and Flemington roads? Why get into a traffic jam to change to another mode of tpt to avoid a traffic jam?

The train starts at Gungahlin Town Centre; are those living in Gungahlin who must first drive to a train station meant to drive from, say, Moncrieff/Casey/Jacka, to Mitchell before catching the train? Why bother? That’s roughly half the distance to Civic or Russell, may as well stay in the car.

I’ll bet the value of a weekly train fare the ACTION system won’t be anywhere near revitalised to provide feeder services from outlying suburbs to the station.

wildturkeycanoe wildturkeycanoe 2:35 pm 27 Mar 15

Maya123 said :

Maya123 said :

wildturkeycanoe said :

Maya123 said :

nemesisrocks said :

There’s a pretty easy solution to all your problems.

Don’t live in Gungahlin.

If being stuck in long lines of traffic, the slow drive to work and the bad public transport is something you are likely to complain about, DON’T buy in the outer suburbs. Lower your expectations for what you want in a house and live closer to work.

Maya123, there is a reason first home buyers don’t buy in Narrabundah or anywhere close to the city. It is approximately $300,000+. That’s the difference in price between a 3 bedroom house in the burbs and one in the old leaf-lined streets of central Canberra. If money grew on trees then yes your idea would be viable but availability is also another factor. There are only six 3 bedroom houses for sale presently in your neighborhood as opposed to sixteen in a selected western Belconnen suburb. Sure, apartments might be an alternative but priced accordingly at 3x what a bedroom is worth on the outskirts too.
If you want the land next door to your house developed into a multistory dwelling, preventing the morning sunshine from illuminating your backyard sanctuary and housing twenty noisy families whose children run around on the street because there is no yard to play in, then that is the kind of change you are suggesting. The A.C.T government wants to do this too, bring medium to high density housing to our inner city areas to bring people closer to work. Unfortunately, in time you will see the traffic woes creep from our roadways to our cycleways. The Commonwealth and Kings Avenue bridges are getting more and more choked up with cyclists, runners and sight-seers. The more people give up on driving their cars, the more they will clog up the transport routes that are available. Buses will be full and”path rage” will become a term familiar to the five o’clock news broadcasters.
If you think getting everyone onto bikes and walking is the answer, try cycling in Beijing. I have never been more scared of riding a bike as I did there. So many people on so narrow a pathway, handlebars inches from clipping one another….
Anyway, I’ve finished my coffee now so better wrap this up. For $300,000 less most people will put up with the traffic, enjoy their spacious backyard, en-suite, energy efficiency and the security of knowing their plumbing won’t need tearing up and replacing in the next few decades.

The house I bought in Narrabundah was the cheapest on the market in the whole of Canberra at that time. The new houses in the outer suburbs were more expensive. As for plumbing, yes I did replace the underground water pipe running from the metre to the house (after living in the house for some years). But I imagine that was a cheaper job than the wall that had to be pulled down in the new house next door to replace the leaking pipe in that. Even new houses can have shoddy work. Houses in Narrabundah are are not necessarily more expensive than houses in the outer suburbs even today. You sound just like the people who couldn’t imagine living without an ensuite in my day and wouldn’t dream of buying a house like the example below in Narrabundah. Yes, it’s small, but there was a family of five living before me in it. There was three of us. The most expensive winter electricity bill I had was about $600. Is your bill any less?
http://www.allhomes.com.au/ah/act/sale-residential/10-euroka-street-narrabundah-canberra/1316949303111

My house had three bedrooms; not two as in the example.

You just proved my point. Almost half a million for two bedrooms in Narrabundah when a 3 bed with ensuite in new suburb can be attained for just over $300k. That’s why people commute and families live on the outskirts. They need the extra rooms for the kids and can’t buy in inner city areas without spending more than they can afford.

Maya123 Maya123 2:27 pm 27 Mar 15

From the ACT Emergency Services website: http://esa.act.gov.au/actas/fees-and-charges/

“ACT Residents travelling in a motor vehicle are covered for emergency ambulance services within the ACT through the road rescue fee levied on vehicle registration. This does not cover incidents with personal liability of injury or damage to a third party.”

I’ve thought further on this. This means that the passengers in the car, who have not paid this fee, are also covered, while a person cycling who might have been hit by the car, is not covered. The passengers don’t pay this fee, because there’s one fee for a car with only driver, and the fee is not increased when there are passengers, so the fee is in effect only paid by the driver. The others get a free ride regarding this insurance, so to speak.

BlowMeDown BlowMeDown 1:48 pm 27 Mar 15

Postalgeek said :

dungfungus said :

Postalgeek said :

wildturkeycanoe said :

Unfortunately, in time you will see the traffic woes creep from our roadways to our cycleways. The Commonwealth and Kings Avenue bridges are getting more and more choked up with cyclists, runners and sight-seers. The more people give up on driving their cars, the more they will clog up the transport routes that are available. Buses will be full and”path rage” will become a term familiar to the five o’clock news broadcasters.

Should that shift occur I guess a road lane would be allocated to cycles and ebikes 🙂

And cyclists don’t even pay the annual $16.60 Road Rescue Fee that car owners have to pay but cyclists are using the ambulance services a lot more that motorists are.

No, cyclists who aren’t also drivers don’t pay the annual $16.60, but then they don’t wear and damage the roads like cars or trucks while still contributing for construction and upkeep through tax. And they generally don’t leave a path of destruction, require fire units to attend or extensive mop up, or require emergency equipment like the Jaws of Life to extricate them from their bicycle.
As for ambulances, if someone, anyone, uses an ambulance they are charged for it. And you’ll have to stump up some evidence for the assertion that cyclists use ambulances more than motorists, given that, in NSW at any rate, motorists use hearses a lot more than cyclists, by a factor of at least 10. I doubt that figures are reversed when it comes to ambulances.

http://roadsafety.transport.nsw.gov.au/downloads/dynamic/nsw-road-toll-daily.pdf

True, the cost of roads comes out of consolidated revenue, but we all know that it is petrol excise taxes that allow that and a lot more besides to happen. Hence the feeling that if you don’t drive you don’t pay for the roads.

In any case, cyclists are definitely benefiting from the need of motor vehicles to have nice roads, bridges, etc to drive over. Motor vehicle drivers derive little to no, and even negative, benefit from sharing the roads with cyclists. Cyclists are not required to be licensed or even competent, do not need to have their bicycles registered as road-worthy, or to be insured for damage to either themselves or others.

And an anecdote: I walk to work and was recently almost run down as I crossed at the lights by a cyclist riding through a red light, as many seem to think they have the right to do. Not sure who would be paying my medical/hospital bills had we collided.

Postalgeek Postalgeek 1:20 pm 27 Mar 15

dungfungus said :

Postalgeek said :

wildturkeycanoe said :

Unfortunately, in time you will see the traffic woes creep from our roadways to our cycleways. The Commonwealth and Kings Avenue bridges are getting more and more choked up with cyclists, runners and sight-seers. The more people give up on driving their cars, the more they will clog up the transport routes that are available. Buses will be full and”path rage” will become a term familiar to the five o’clock news broadcasters.

Should that shift occur I guess a road lane would be allocated to cycles and ebikes 🙂

And cyclists don’t even pay the annual $16.60 Road Rescue Fee that car owners have to pay but cyclists are using the ambulance services a lot more that motorists are.

No, cyclists who aren’t also drivers don’t pay the annual $16.60, but then they don’t wear and damage the roads like cars or trucks while still contributing for construction and upkeep through tax. And they generally don’t leave a path of destruction, require fire units to attend or extensive mop up, or require emergency equipment like the Jaws of Life to extricate them from their bicycle.
As for ambulances, if someone, anyone, uses an ambulance they are charged for it. And you’ll have to stump up some evidence for the assertion that cyclists use ambulances more than motorists, given that, in NSW at any rate, motorists use hearses a lot more than cyclists, by a factor of at least 10. I doubt that figures are reversed when it comes to ambulances.

http://roadsafety.transport.nsw.gov.au/downloads/dynamic/nsw-road-toll-daily.pdf

Maya123 Maya123 1:12 pm 27 Mar 15

dungfungus said :

Maya123 said :

dungfungus said :

Postalgeek said :

wildturkeycanoe said :

Unfortunately, in time you will see the traffic woes creep from our roadways to our cycleways. The Commonwealth and Kings Avenue bridges are getting more and more choked up with cyclists, runners and sight-seers. The more people give up on driving their cars, the more they will clog up the transport routes that are available. Buses will be full and”path rage” will become a term familiar to the five o’clock news broadcasters.

Should that shift occur I guess a road lane would be allocated to cycles and ebikes 🙂

And cyclists don’t even pay the annual $16.60 Road Rescue Fee that car owners have to pay but cyclists are using the ambulance services a lot more that motorists are.

Most adult cyclists do pay this, as they also own cars, as I’m sure you know. But just because they own a car doesn’t mean it has to be driven everywhere, and so the roads have less wear and tear.

All adult car owners pay the fee; only cyclists without cars don’t and there are plenty of them.
A lot of car drivers would like to be cyclists however for one reason or another they can’t.
Care to comment why the cyclists use the ambulance/ED services disproportionately more that motorists?

From the ACT Emergency Services website: http://esa.act.gov.au/actas/fees-and-charges/

“ACT Residents travelling in a motor vehicle are covered for emergency ambulance services within the ACT through the road rescue fee levied on vehicle registration. This does not cover incidents with personal liability of injury or damage to a third party.”

So only “ACT Residents travelling in a motor vehicle are covered for emergency ambulance services within the ACT”, not others, which I presume means people cycling are not covered, so why do you think that people who don’t own a car should pay for a service that won’t cover them?

I have had the need twice to have an ambulance called for me. Neither time connected with me cycling or being an “ACT Residents travelling in a motor vehicle”. Once I wasn’t taken to hospital, but treated on the spot; the other time I was. Both times I received a bill of, from memory, of about $600. No car insurance paid for this. My private health insurance did. If I hadn’t had private health insurance I would have had to pay this bill myself.

So from what the ACT Emergency Services website says, ACT people travelling in cars are covered, but people not travelling in cars, such as people cycling and in other situations, such as mine, are not covered by this.

dungfungus dungfungus 12:41 pm 27 Mar 15

Maya123 said :

dungfungus said :

Postalgeek said :

wildturkeycanoe said :

Unfortunately, in time you will see the traffic woes creep from our roadways to our cycleways. The Commonwealth and Kings Avenue bridges are getting more and more choked up with cyclists, runners and sight-seers. The more people give up on driving their cars, the more they will clog up the transport routes that are available. Buses will be full and”path rage” will become a term familiar to the five o’clock news broadcasters.

Should that shift occur I guess a road lane would be allocated to cycles and ebikes 🙂

And cyclists don’t even pay the annual $16.60 Road Rescue Fee that car owners have to pay but cyclists are using the ambulance services a lot more that motorists are.

Most adult cyclists do pay this, as they also own cars, as I’m sure you know. But just because they own a car doesn’t mean it has to be driven everywhere, and so the roads have less wear and tear.

All adult car owners pay the fee; only cyclists without cars don’t and there are plenty of them.
A lot of car drivers would like to be cyclists however for one reason or another they can’t.
Care to comment why the cyclists use the ambulance/ED services disproportionately more that motorists?

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