Homophobic doctor in Charnie?

gimmeth 28 November 2010 179

I was just told about this petition displayed on the wall of the doctor’s surgery with the doctor’s signature as the signature listed at the top of the list.  Make your own judgement as to what it means.  Of course the discrimination is not direct, so I suspect, the doctor probably can’t get in trouble for it.  So telling everyone about the notice is not a problem either, after all the doctor wants people to know how she feels, otherwise she wouldn’t put such a sign up in her surgery.  So the the sign says…..

Canberra Declaration, Sign to Protect Life, Marriage & Family and Religious Liberty in Australia.

We the concerned …citizens of Australia support the Canberra Declaration and have signed the below petition in support of freedom, life, family and our children….. These values are being undermined on many fronts by many opponents, WHO DO NOT HAVE THE BEST INTERESTS OF OUR NATION OR OUR CHILDREN AT HEART. For this reason we ask the House and the Government to act defensively and proactively in creating legislation and policy that protects life, protects and strengthens marriage, protects and supports the NATURAL FAMILY, protects religious freedom and PROTECTS OUR CHILDREN”.

The doctor is Tilllyard Drive Medical Practice in Charnwood. Riana Van Rensberg, the practice is owned by her and her husband.

I am revolted that this would be put up in  a doctor’s office. I fully support the doctor’s right to lobby on behalf of their beliefs, to sign and/or launch petitions about things important to them, but to put up a sign that undermines a portion of her clientelle??? I mean people do not generally choose to be ill enough to present to a doctor, and now anyone who doesn’t fit this model of whatever a “natural family” is, will undoubtedly have concerns about whether they will get the best possible care.

[ED – We’ve covered the Canberra declaration before]

The Canberra Declaration

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damien haas damien haas 3:37 pm 13 Apr 11

Jim Jones said :

damien haas said :

I dont understand why the doctor has to agree with and support your lifestyle choices. Surely, like any other professional, you should simply be seeking the best medical service available. Whether they share your lifestyle choice, religion, politics etc is immaterial. Has any aspect of their medical service been unsatisfactory ?

Do you make sure your plumber or car mechanic agrees with and supports your lifestyle choices ?

If there is some gaping philosophical point Im missing – enlighten me.

Lifestyle choice? WTF?

Being gay is a ‘lifestyle choice’ in precisely the same way being born Asian is a ‘lifestyle choice’.

Perhaps a poor choice of words, My apologies to those offended.

damien haas damien haas 3:36 pm 13 Apr 11

toriness said :

damien haas said :

I dont understand why the doctor has to agree with and support your lifestyle choices. Surely, like any other professional, you should simply be seeking the best medical service available. Whether they share your lifestyle choice, religion, politics etc is immaterial. Has any aspect of their medical service been unsatisfactory ?

Do you make sure your plumber or car mechanic agrees with and supports your lifestyle choices ?

If there is some gaping philosophical point Im missing – enlighten me.

wow. you’re surely trolling – you honestly believe your personal health is equated to getting your car tuned or loo unblocked? what a ridiculous thing to say. seeing a GP is often far more than just physical health. and even if there are physical symptoms, they can be a manifestation of emotional or psychological issues which need to be sympathetically diagnosed and referred. and that is not to say or imply (as you probably will) that the gay community suffer more psychological or emotional issues than heterosexuals. what i actually am saying is that the GP is a critical first port of call on a multitude of health issues which are *surprise surprise* often related to what you call “lifestyle choices” – if i need to explain it further than that for you, well i am not wasting my fingers typing it out.

It’s not a ‘troll’ at all.

I dont understand why this person feels that their doctor must support/share their beliefs, instead of just being the recipient of the best medical care they can get.

Would they rather receive lesser quality care from a doctor that shared in all their beliefs ?

I dont think Ive ever asked a professionals political/religious/moral beliefs before seeking their services. It is one of the strangest things Ive read on Riotact.

Jim Jones Jim Jones 11:37 am 13 Apr 11

georgesgenitals said :

Jim Jones said :

[Being gay is a ‘lifestyle choice’ in precisely the same way being born Asian is a ‘lifestyle choice’.

I can choose to be born Asian? Sweet – where do I sign up?

Probably at a Fundamentalist Christian University in midwest USA.

georgesgenitals georgesgenitals 11:33 am 13 Apr 11

Jim Jones said :

[Being gay is a ‘lifestyle choice’ in precisely the same way being born Asian is a ‘lifestyle choice’.

I can choose to be born Asian? Sweet – where do I sign up?

fgzk fgzk 10:33 am 13 Apr 11

If only Jesus had “Come out of the closet”. It would have saved a lot of hasseles.

Jim Jones Jim Jones 9:59 am 13 Apr 11

damien haas said :

I dont understand why the doctor has to agree with and support your lifestyle choices. Surely, like any other professional, you should simply be seeking the best medical service available. Whether they share your lifestyle choice, religion, politics etc is immaterial. Has any aspect of their medical service been unsatisfactory ?

Do you make sure your plumber or car mechanic agrees with and supports your lifestyle choices ?

If there is some gaping philosophical point Im missing – enlighten me.

Lifestyle choice? WTF?

Being gay is a ‘lifestyle choice’ in precisely the same way being born Asian is a ‘lifestyle choice’.

georgesgenitals georgesgenitals 9:32 am 13 Apr 11

colourful sydney racing identity said :

You don’t think doctors let their personal religious views get in the way of providing quality service?

You do know that there are numerous doctors who refuse to prescribe contraception based on their archaic beliefs?

This is a particular problem in country towns where there is only one doctor. And of course they will not provide unbiased advice when the predictable thing happens and the young woman ends up pregnant.

The question, I guess, is whether THIS doctor (or practice is doing that). Does this practice refuse to provide contraception? Or perform abortions? Or circumcisions even?

There’s no argument that there’s no point going to a doctor who won’t perform an operation or prescribe a particular treatment. But is that what’s happening in this case? A doctor either performs/prescribes or doesn’t – I’d be very surprised to see a doctor taking a ‘half-assed approach’.

colourful sydney racing identity colourful sydney racing identity 9:19 am 13 Apr 11

georgesgenitals said :

toriness said :

damien haas said :

I dont understand why the doctor has to agree with and support your lifestyle choices. Surely, like any other professional, you should simply be seeking the best medical service available. Whether they share your lifestyle choice, religion, politics etc is immaterial. Has any aspect of their medical service been unsatisfactory ?

Do you make sure your plumber or car mechanic agrees with and supports your lifestyle choices ?

If there is some gaping philosophical point Im missing – enlighten me.

wow. you’re surely trolling – you honestly believe your personal health is equated to getting your car tuned or loo unblocked? what a ridiculous thing to say. seeing a GP is often far more than just physical health. and even if there are physical symptoms, they can be a manifestation of emotional or psychological issues which need to be sympathetically diagnosed and referred. and that is not to say or imply (as you probably will) that the gay community suffer more psychological or emotional issues than heterosexuals. what i actually am saying is that the GP is a critical first port of call on a multitude of health issues which are *surprise surprise* often related to what you call “lifestyle choices” – if i need to explain it further than that for you, well i am not wasting my fingers typing it out.

I disagree. Health professionals, especially doctors, are highly trained and capable of providing quality service even if they don’t share the same opinion about things. Do doctors provide less satisfactory service because people are alcoholics, or obese, or self-harm deliberately? What about people who have unsafe sex, or share needles? Doctors see all manner of difficult and sad situations, and still provide help to people. Doctors see people from all walks of life. Doctors themselves are men, women, come from all over the world, are gay or straight, whatever.

I really don’t think this is an issue.

You don’t think doctors let their personal religious views get in the way of providing quality service?

You do know that there are numerous doctors who refuse to prescribe contraception based on their archaic beliefs?

This is a particular problem in country towns where there is only one doctor. And of course they will not provide unbiased advice when the predictable thing happens and the young woman ends up pregnant.

georgesgenitals georgesgenitals 7:13 am 13 Apr 11

toriness said :

damien haas said :

I dont understand why the doctor has to agree with and support your lifestyle choices. Surely, like any other professional, you should simply be seeking the best medical service available. Whether they share your lifestyle choice, religion, politics etc is immaterial. Has any aspect of their medical service been unsatisfactory ?

Do you make sure your plumber or car mechanic agrees with and supports your lifestyle choices ?

If there is some gaping philosophical point Im missing – enlighten me.

wow. you’re surely trolling – you honestly believe your personal health is equated to getting your car tuned or loo unblocked? what a ridiculous thing to say. seeing a GP is often far more than just physical health. and even if there are physical symptoms, they can be a manifestation of emotional or psychological issues which need to be sympathetically diagnosed and referred. and that is not to say or imply (as you probably will) that the gay community suffer more psychological or emotional issues than heterosexuals. what i actually am saying is that the GP is a critical first port of call on a multitude of health issues which are *surprise surprise* often related to what you call “lifestyle choices” – if i need to explain it further than that for you, well i am not wasting my fingers typing it out.

I disagree. Health professionals, especially doctors, are highly trained and capable of providing quality service even if they don’t share the same opinion about things. Do doctors provide less satisfactory service because people are alcoholics, or obese, or self-harm deliberately? What about people who have unsafe sex, or share needles? Doctors see all manner of difficult and sad situations, and still provide help to people. Doctors see people from all walks of life. Doctors themselves are men, women, come from all over the world, are gay or straight, whatever.

I really don’t think this is an issue.

toriness toriness 11:09 pm 12 Apr 11

damien haas said :

I dont understand why the doctor has to agree with and support your lifestyle choices. Surely, like any other professional, you should simply be seeking the best medical service available. Whether they share your lifestyle choice, religion, politics etc is immaterial. Has any aspect of their medical service been unsatisfactory ?

Do you make sure your plumber or car mechanic agrees with and supports your lifestyle choices ?

If there is some gaping philosophical point Im missing – enlighten me.

wow. you’re surely trolling – you honestly believe your personal health is equated to getting your car tuned or loo unblocked? what a ridiculous thing to say. seeing a GP is often far more than just physical health. and even if there are physical symptoms, they can be a manifestation of emotional or psychological issues which need to be sympathetically diagnosed and referred. and that is not to say or imply (as you probably will) that the gay community suffer more psychological or emotional issues than heterosexuals. what i actually am saying is that the GP is a critical first port of call on a multitude of health issues which are *surprise surprise* often related to what you call “lifestyle choices” – if i need to explain it further than that for you, well i am not wasting my fingers typing it out.

Mysteryman Mysteryman 8:07 pm 12 Apr 11

R. Slicker said :

Prettykitty said :

While I acknowledge that it’s been over 4 months since this happened, I have finally found the strength to discuss the issues, as this incident happened to me directly and caused a great deal of stress and trauma.

Blah, blah, blah

This thread is really very silly and demonstrates that many people are simply hypersensitive and can’t keep their personal feelings out of what should be a serious and on the level relationship with a health professional.

I am a client of someone who might be described as a homophobic doctor. When our old family doctor retired, a new doctor arrived and took over the practice. He is an Irish Catholic and fairly conservative and straight-laced. When I contracted Hep A I told him how it happened (gay sexual practices) and his facial expressions demonstrated his reaction. But he prescribed medication and told me to return if it didn’t work.

When I told him I had balanitis on my foreskin he referred me to a specialist who booked me in for a circumcision. Again he was doing all this in between seeing little Johnny and his mum over everyday ailments.

Even today, more than 20 years after he arrived I still see him for any medical problems and he has always dealt with me in an even-handed and professional matter. He even bulk bills if it is a short appointment. Why would I want to put all that at risk over some silly moral position which has nothing to do with his duties as a family doctor?

The problem many gays have when dealing with doctors and other professionals is that they (the gays) quite often get so caught up in political activism and “causes”, they react with dismay when others do not share their enthusiasm. They believe it is homophobia. The gay marriage issue is a case in point.

I would suggest, princess, that you take a Bex and have a good lie down. To jeopardise your relationship with your doctor over such an irrelevant issue demonstrates a high level of preciousness on your part and shows that you have an innate inability to separate the medical from the political.

Well said.

eily eily 7:53 pm 12 Apr 11

colourful sydney racing identity said :

Jim Jones said :

shadow boxer said :

I hate religion of all kinds with a vengeance but you have to admit marriage is a religous ceromony, designed to bless a union in front of god.

The concept of marriage predates organised religion (and certainly monotheism) by a loooooong way.

The Ancient Egyptians, Sumerians and Babylonians all had marriage. I’d assume that similarly ancient civilisations in China, America, etc. had similar concepts.

In most of these cases, there wasn’t a hell of a lot of religious significance to it – marriage is primarily a social compact.

Some christians’ (certainly not all) attempts to define marriage as ‘a religious thing’ is arrogant and obnoxious, being premised on little more than bigoted nonsense. If marriage is such ‘a religious thing’, why aren’t they upset when atheists get married?

+1 Jim, well said.

Well, they are right about one thing though, marriage is about children, just not the way they would like. It’s about the man supporting his wife so she can produce lots of children.

Religions survive by getting bums on seats, lots of followers means lots of money and lots of power. Which means having lots of new followers. If you can’t convert ’em, breed ’em. And a woman could be perpetually having babies if there was someone to look after her and the children. But why would a man look after a child which wasn’t his.

Marriage became used to prove ownership of the woman, her womb and the children out of her. Remember it isn’t that long ago the wife had to vow to ‘obey’ her husband.

The product of marriage became so important that, in spite of what the more puritan religionists (is that a word) would like to believe, it was fairly common for the bride to be proven ‘with child’ as she walked down the aisle. And that was still happening less than a hundred years ago. The woman on the Ancestry Oz ad shouldn’t be so surprised. Wonder how many marriages didn’t go ahead because the woman couldn’t get pregnant?

And when you add inheritance issues into the mix, no wonder the male dominated religions and societies enforced behaviours that strengthened their power.

And while ‘marriage’ existed in early history and prehistory it wouldn’t of existed in the form we now know. A couple probably stayed together until the child was weaned, which could of been up to 5 years. Or longer if a second child came along. Mothers only really needed to be supported while they were breast feeding. They could then just of as easily move into another ‘marriage’ having another child to a different mate. Remember the whole society/village/tribe/extended family would have helped bring up the children together. Parentage wasn’t as important as survival.

damien haas damien haas 5:47 pm 12 Apr 11

I dont understand why the doctor has to agree with and support your lifestyle choices. Surely, like any other professional, you should simply be seeking the best medical service available. Whether they share your lifestyle choice, religion, politics etc is immaterial. Has any aspect of their medical service been unsatisfactory ?

Do you make sure your plumber or car mechanic agrees with and supports your lifestyle choices ?

If there is some gaping philosophical point Im missing – enlighten me.

Mysteryman Mysteryman 5:19 pm 12 Apr 11

Jim Jones said :

shadow boxer said :

I hate religion of all kinds with a vengeance but you have to admit marriage is a religous ceromony, designed to bless a union in front of god.

The concept of marriage predates organised religion (and certainly monotheism) by a loooooong way.

The Ancient Egyptians, Sumerians and Babylonians all had marriage. I’d assume that similarly ancient civilisations in China, America, etc. had similar concepts.

In most of these cases, there wasn’t a hell of a lot of religious significance to it – marriage is primarily a social compact.

Some christians’ (certainly not all) attempts to define marriage as ‘a religious thing’ is arrogant and obnoxious, being premised on little more than bigoted nonsense. If marriage is such ‘a religious thing’, why aren’t they upset when atheists get married?

I don’t think so. Your assertion that it pre-dates “organised religion” depends on a lot on how you define organised religion, but every one of those cultures you mentioned had a long history of religion/spirituality that was an essential part of their culture. Marriage certainly pre-dates Christianity (defined as those who follow Christ – Christ having lived some 2000 or so years ago) but to say it pre-dates any form of religion or spirituality would be a heck of a stretch, especially as both marriage and religion appear to have existed before reliable historical records.

R. Slicker R. Slicker 4:44 pm 12 Apr 11

Prettykitty said :

While I acknowledge that it’s been over 4 months since this happened, I have finally found the strength to discuss the issues, as this incident happened to me directly and caused a great deal of stress and trauma.

Blah, blah, blah

This thread is really very silly and demonstrates that many people are simply hypersensitive and can’t keep their personal feelings out of what should be a serious and on the level relationship with a health professional.

I am a client of someone who might be described as a homophobic doctor. When our old family doctor retired, a new doctor arrived and took over the practice. He is an Irish Catholic and fairly conservative and straight-laced. When I contracted Hep A I told him how it happened (gay sexual practices) and his facial expressions demonstrated his reaction. But he prescribed medication and told me to return if it didn’t work.

When I told him I had balanitis on my foreskin he referred me to a specialist who booked me in for a circumcision. Again he was doing all this in between seeing little Johnny and his mum over everyday ailments.

Even today, more than 20 years after he arrived I still see him for any medical problems and he has always dealt with me in an even-handed and professional matter. He even bulk bills if it is a short appointment. Why would I want to put all that at risk over some silly moral position which has nothing to do with his duties as a family doctor?

The problem many gays have when dealing with doctors and other professionals is that they (the gays) quite often get so caught up in political activism and “causes”, they react with dismay when others do not share their enthusiasm. They believe it is homophobia. The gay marriage issue is a case in point.

I would suggest, princess, that you take a Bex and have a good lie down. To jeopardise your relationship with your doctor over such an irrelevant issue demonstrates a high level of preciousness on your part and shows that you have an innate inability to separate the medical from the political.

shadow boxer shadow boxer 4:16 pm 12 Apr 11

I can’t speak for them but I’m pretty sure they are upset. Try going to a priest telling him you’re an athiest and ask him to marry you in his church.

I’m pretty sure he will say no.

Blamemonkey Blamemonkey 4:09 pm 12 Apr 11

shadow boxer said :

I hate religion of all kinds with a vengeance but you have to admit marriage is a religous ceromony, designed to bless a union in front of god.

The problem with the Gay Marriage argument is that the people are opposed to it from a religious point of view, where as the people who are campaigning for it are coming from a legal point of view.

I don’t see any person (except some self important idiot) having an issue from being refused a religious ceremony because there life doesn’t match up with the doctrines of the faith, like suicides refused funeral services in some churches.

But denying a same sex couples the same (legal) rights as a mixed sex couple is just stupid, and I for hope that the law is changed soon.

colourful sydney racing identity colourful sydney racing identity 3:27 pm 12 Apr 11

Jim Jones said :

shadow boxer said :

I hate religion of all kinds with a vengeance but you have to admit marriage is a religous ceromony, designed to bless a union in front of god.

The concept of marriage predates organised religion (and certainly monotheism) by a loooooong way.

The Ancient Egyptians, Sumerians and Babylonians all had marriage. I’d assume that similarly ancient civilisations in China, America, etc. had similar concepts.

In most of these cases, there wasn’t a hell of a lot of religious significance to it – marriage is primarily a social compact.

Some christians’ (certainly not all) attempts to define marriage as ‘a religious thing’ is arrogant and obnoxious, being premised on little more than bigoted nonsense. If marriage is such ‘a religious thing’, why aren’t they upset when atheists get married?

+1 Jim, well said.

Jim Jones Jim Jones 2:46 pm 12 Apr 11

shadow boxer said :

I hate religion of all kinds with a vengeance but you have to admit marriage is a religous ceromony, designed to bless a union in front of god.

The concept of marriage predates organised religion (and certainly monotheism) by a loooooong way.

The Ancient Egyptians, Sumerians and Babylonians all had marriage. I’d assume that similarly ancient civilisations in China, America, etc. had similar concepts.

In most of these cases, there wasn’t a hell of a lot of religious significance to it – marriage is primarily a social compact.

Some christians’ (certainly not all) attempts to define marriage as ‘a religious thing’ is arrogant and obnoxious, being premised on little more than bigoted nonsense. If marriage is such ‘a religious thing’, why aren’t they upset when atheists get married?

shadow boxer shadow boxer 1:25 pm 12 Apr 11

I hate religion of all kinds with a vengeance but you have to admit marriage is a religous ceromony, designed to bless a union in front of god.

I imagine religous people would be quite peeved when outsiders just show up for marriages and funerals and expect the red carpet rolled out for them.

You can hold whatever service you want to mark your union under law but I don’t see the churches have any obligation to provide anyone a marriage if they don’t agree with that particular churches teachings.

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