Skip to content Skip to main navigation

Business

Buying or selling? Get the right advice

How do we feel about the public service?

By johnboy - 19 July 2011 41

The Centre for Policy Development is touting their latest research “Attitudes towards the public service” of which an extract is available.

Here’s the skinny:

    • Most Australians support government exercising an active role in society and the economy.

    • There is strong community preference for public (rather than private) sector agencies delivering services including transport, policing, health and education.

    • Outsourcing and privatisation occur despite and contrary to these preferences.

    • Australians are generally supportive of increased public service funding, even if that means paying higher taxes.

    • A majority of citizens express reservations about the current bipartisan determination to return the Australian budget to surplus as soon as possible. Surveys indicate that this is not widely supported if it comes at the expense of adequately funded public services.

    • Surveys indicate a higher level of confidence in public service agencies than major companies.

    • Agency surveys provide an inadequate assessment of client satisfaction.

    • The mainstream media communicates primarily negative stereotypes of public servants.

    • Australian politicians reinforce these stereotypes, expressing distinctly less positive attitudes toward the public service than those of other community members: they are less likely than citizens to express satisfaction, confidence or willingness to fund and regularly invoke very negative stereotypes.

    • Studies of APS employees toward their workplaces and employers present contradictory impressions. Surveys administered by the Australian Public Service Commission (APSC) present a largely positive picture including high levels of employee satisfaction, motivation and sense of personal accomplishment. These surveys also indicate that many APS employees feel that their agencies discourage innovation and that their interactions with Ministers and other elected representatives are often difficult.

    • Surveys conducted by the Commonwealth Public Sector Union (CPSU) present a significantly less positive impression. For instance, a significant proportion of female public servants report their work-life balance difficulties and bullying in their workplaces

What’s Your opinion?


Post a comment
Please login to post your comments, or connect with
41 Responses to
How do we feel about the public service?
p1 4:22 pm 19 Jul 11

Jethro said :

I would say the big difference is between the front line public servants (police, nurses, teachers, etc) who seem to get paid less and work under tougher conditions than the people in head offices dictating to them how they should do their jobs

While I tend to agree that on average cops, nurses and teachers get a pretty raw deal pay-wise, your generalisations are as bad as all the others in this thread.

I am in one of those “head offices”. I do things vital to the “real world” “on ground” work of “front line” people yet don’t get to tell them how to do what they do (well, not much. I do insist they tell me how they spend all the funding, something they don’t always like to do….).

How do I fit in this model?

Rollersk8r 4:10 pm 19 Jul 11

Strongly agree with the point on negative media coverage. Further – it’s amazing to see how often Canberra is bashed (by online comments) over misunderstandings of federal vs. state responsibilities; and who is a public servant and who isn’t.

Public servants are never seen to be police, nurses, teachers, no.

Jethro 3:43 pm 19 Jul 11

Swaggie said :

Oddly enough there seems to be a world of difference between Federal Public Servants and local Gvmt Public Servants, the Federal ones I’ve met do demonstrate an understanding of what a work ethic means, something noticeably lacking in local Gvmt Public Servants who by and large seem to be time servers and little else.

I would say the big difference is between the front line public servants (police, nurses, teachers, etc) who seem to get paid less and work under tougher conditions than the people in head offices dictating to them how they should do their jobs

Watson 3:26 pm 19 Jul 11

Swaggie said :

Oddly enough there seems to be a world of difference between Federal Public Servants and local Gvmt Public Servants, the Federal ones I’ve met do demonstrate an understanding of what a work ethic means, something noticeably lacking in local Gvmt Public Servants who by and large seem to be time servers and little else.

Wow. some sweeping generalisation based on a few people that you know.

Thumper 2:52 pm 19 Jul 11

#8
Clown Killer
2:13 pm, 19 Jul 11
I find, in the majority of cases, that proponents of the ‘real world’ paradigm are simply describing the boundaries of their own very personal version of failure. People getting along with their business, being smart, successful, respected for what the contribute and being well rewarded for the hard work that they consistently put in … they all belong to some other, alien world that the proponent cannot enter because they are stupid, lazy, a pain in the arse to work with, lack motivation or specialist skills or simply refuse to make their own luck. For them, this miserable situation is very (very) real, whilst the life of others, because of its unattainability, is by definition not real at all.

Yep. I reckon that just about nails it.

Swaggie 2:45 pm 19 Jul 11

Oddly enough there seems to be a world of difference between Federal Public Servants and local Gvmt Public Servants, the Federal ones I’ve met do demonstrate an understanding of what a work ethic means, something noticeably lacking in local Gvmt Public Servants who by and large seem to be time servers and little else.

Watson 2:31 pm 19 Jul 11

CamillaG said :

I recently moved to the APS after a ‘spiritual awakening and an ache to ‘serve”. I find it all mind boggling. Perhaps it’s because I’m in a small agency. I find there to be low levels of value add and high levels of pandering to inflated egos.

I’m bullied on a daily basis. I get yelled at and provided with low level work (e.g. filing) even though I’m at an EL. I moved here from a top tier Management Consulting firm where I earned and contributed multiple fold.

My manager’s boss attributes my manager’s behavior to insecurity – because I’m 30 years his junior and female. Ageist and sexist much? Also completely spineless through and through.

At the end of my contract, I shall try and satiate my quarter life crisis elsewhere. Waste of a move and 10 months of my life.

There are few places where you get offered as clear a path to report bullying as in the public service. I know people who’ve done it and came out on top.

If you think your experience is typical in the public service, that’s your business of course. It’s an extremely limited sample to base an opinion on though. You can find bad managers everywhere, but there’s plenty of decent ones around too.

Clown Killer 2:13 pm 19 Jul 11

I find, in the majority of cases, that proponents of the ‘real world’ paradigm are simply describing the boundaries of their own very personal version of failure. People getting along with their business, being smart, successful, respected for what the contribute and being well rewarded for the hard work that they consistently put in … they all belong to some other, alien world that the proponent cannot enter because they are stupid, lazy, a pain in the arse to work with, lack motivation or specialist skills or simply refuse to make their own luck. For them, this miserable situation is very (very) real, whilst the life of others, because of its unattainability, is by definition not real at all.

shadow boxer 2:12 pm 19 Jul 11

“Management Consulting firm where I earned and contributed multiple fold”

Plenty of oxymorons in there, maybe the PS is the real world and your getting a dose of it ?

p1 1:53 pm 19 Jul 11

bitzermaloney said :

Decentralise and get the public “servants” to live and work in the real world. How can you be a “servant” when you don’t know who you are serving?

Maximum troll points for this post.

I hate the real world, that is why I live in Canberra, where there are big wide four lane roads and free parking.

CamillaG 1:36 pm 19 Jul 11

I recently moved to the APS after a ‘spiritual awakening and an ache to ‘serve”. I find it all mind boggling. Perhaps it’s because I’m in a small agency. I find there to be low levels of value add and high levels of pandering to inflated egos.

I’m bullied on a daily basis. I get yelled at and provided with low level work (e.g. filing) even though I’m at an EL. I moved here from a top tier Management Consulting firm where I earned and contributed multiple fold.

My manager’s boss attributes my manager’s behavior to insecurity – because I’m 30 years his junior and female. Ageist and sexist much? Also completely spineless through and through.

At the end of my contract, I shall try and satiate my quarter life crisis elsewhere. Waste of a move and 10 months of my life.

sarah_07 1:27 pm 19 Jul 11

bitzermaloney said :

Decentralise and get the public “servants” to live and work in the real world. How can you be a “servant” when you don’t know who you are serving?

I am a public servant and believe me I live and work in the real world. Cut us we bleed too!!

triffid 1:19 pm 19 Jul 11

Watson said :

So where do they live? Utopia?

No, Xanadu. It’s the bordering country that is at much, much higher altitude.

Watson 1:09 pm 19 Jul 11

bitzermaloney said :

Decentralise and get the public “servants” to live and work in the real world. How can you be a “servant” when you don’t know who you are serving?

So where do they live? Utopia?

bitzermaloney 12:52 pm 19 Jul 11

Decentralise and get the public “servants” to live and work in the real world. How can you be a “servant” when you don’t know who you are serving?

1 2 3

Related Articles

CBR Tweets

Sign up to our newsletter

Top
Copyright © 2017 Riot ACT Holdings Pty Ltd. All rights reserved.
www.the-riotact.com | www.b2bmagazine.com.au | www.thisiscanberra.com

Search across the site