How you can fight the ACT Government’s Bag Ban

Mr Gillespie 9 February 2012 189

Are you sick of having to pay for your own shopping bags these days because of the ACT Government’s Plastic Shopping Bag Ban? I am looking for ideas to send Simon the message that we will not accept decisions about shopping bags being forced down our throats each and every time we go to the corner shop to get the groceries.

Despite what Labor and the Greens say, this ban is not about saving the environment. It is about penalising people financially for using plastic shopping bags, much like how Julia Gillard is penalising people financially, with her Carbon Tax.

I apologise in advance for sounding stupid when offering my own ideas, but I am happy to hear from anyone here on RiotACT who has better ideas on how to fight this menace before we finally get the chance to ‘bag’ the bag banners once and for all, at the October 2012 election.

Here are some of my own ideas:

  • Bring your own “reusable” bags, but display protest messages about how disgusted you are with the ACT Government’s shopping bag ban, and a reminder about the October 20 election
  • If you haven’t brought your own bags, wait for the shop assistant to finish pricing all your groceries and you are ready to pay, before they ask you if you want any bags. Don’t accept the assistant’s question about wanting to “buy” any bags. Instead, refuse to pay for your shopping, and leave all items at the checkout counter.
  • Find a shop that hands out free bags (they can be paper bags, they don’t even have to be plastic). Refuse to accept having to pay for shopping bags.
  • Shop in Queanbeyan (sounds a bit silly, and not cost-effective if you don’t live in that side of Canberra)

I have also tried talking to a (Liberal-voting) high-profile Canberra store manager, and offered a petition, but he didn’t sound very optimistic and said I would need a huge number of signatures if I was to hope to make any difference, because the current Assembly has too many numbers supporting the ban. He suggested going on ABC Radio 666 in the morning when MLAs are likely to be listening on their way to work, and waiting for a related topic to come up.

What NOT to do (apart from the obvious):

  • Don’t carry green-coloured bags around, or display any bag that bears “save the planet” or other environmental propaganda messages
  • Don’t pay the shop assistant for any bags, or allow yourself to be tricked into buying any bags
  • Don’t fall for the ACT Government’s environmental reasoning behind the ban

Remember — this is about our rights not to be bossed around by the ‘Nanny State’ like this. The Green’s agenda is all about trying to control our lives whenever they see a reason that has to do with “saving the environment”. They don’t care about basic facts like the ACT is a small, landlocked state away with very, very little access to the open ocean where the world’s waste collects into gyres like the Great Pacific Garbage Patch. They don’t take into account the fact that there are a whole lot of other things made of plastic or something else non-biodegradeable that goes to waste in mass quantities. The Greens can reason all they like, but it doesn’t alter the fact that their policies intrude into our day-to-day lives to unacceptable levels.

Does it worry you what they will do next? The Greens-run Gold Coast City Council banned helium balloons. Do you want the same thing happening here?

[ED – more than usually, the poster’s views are their own]


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189 Responses to How you can fight the ACT Government’s Bag Ban
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The Traineediplomat The Traineediplomat 7:25 pm 10 Feb 12

Mr Gillespie said :

p1 said :

……….There is really only one thing in this whole thread I see worthy of real debate. That is – whether the advantage to the environment and society of less plastic bags being used outweighs the inconvenience and frustration that the change from thin free bags to thick 10c bags imposes on us all.

Personally, I think it is worth it.

….and I don’t — and that is why I started this thread in the first place.

Thing is, I have to get the groceries, otherwise I will run out of food (any idiot can work that one out). I don’t have the time to support some green nutter’s crusade to make themselves feel good about the environment. The only time I have for when I go shopping, is to get the groceries, wait in those stupid queues (an unavoidable hassle but not put there deliberately unlike this stupid bag ban), pay for them through the checkout, and get out and take them back home. I don’t feel it is right to be compelled to pay for something to carry the groceries home in, just because they no longer meet some “standards” about micron thicknesses, that have nothing to do with PEOPLE’S health and safety.

I’m sorry a lot of people disagree with me so much they fling insults back at me, telling me to “get a life” and “build a bridge and get over it”, and be mocked and have my argument turned into a laughing stock and have my words twisted around to suit themselves.

Shop online and have the groceries delivered if you hate waiting in queues and parking 5m from the store.

It’s the same as any stick or carrot approach. Eventually it will change people’s behaviour. Like drink driving, remember how widespread and ‘normal’ that was in the 1970s etc? Now only arsehats continue to do it.

Maybe I’ve worked out Mr Gillespies ‘thing’, he’s a 1970s arsehat that refuses to change.

Baldy Baldy 5:07 pm 10 Feb 12

So this is a new human right. Food, shelter, water and thin plastic bags.

Maybe you should write a letter to the federal government to tell them about this blatent abuse of human rights.

Holden Caulfield Holden Caulfield 5:05 pm 10 Feb 12

bitzermaloney said :

Holden Caulfield said :

bitzermaloney said :

Jim Jones said :

If you really think that all the plastic bags were being used as bin liners, then I’ve got an awesome bridge to sell you.

The multicultural bridge?

That’s no good, with all the road closures nobody will be able to drive across it.

Given it was suppose to be a footbridge that’s probably a good thing. Also, given how many cars are in Civic Walk today it probably won’t stop them either.

Yes, I realise it was supposed to be a footbridge. London Circuit is also supposed to be a road, but it’s not this weekend due to the ? festival (see if you can find the missing word).

😉

Mr Gillespie Mr Gillespie 5:00 pm 10 Feb 12

p1 said :

……….There is really only one thing in this whole thread I see worthy of real debate. That is – whether the advantage to the environment and society of less plastic bags being used outweighs the inconvenience and frustration that the change from thin free bags to thick 10c bags imposes on us all.

Personally, I think it is worth it.

….and I don’t — and that is why I started this thread in the first place.

Thing is, I have to get the groceries, otherwise I will run out of food (any idiot can work that one out). I don’t have the time to support some green nutter’s crusade to make themselves feel good about the environment. The only time I have for when I go shopping, is to get the groceries, wait in those stupid queues (an unavoidable hassle but not put there deliberately unlike this stupid bag ban), pay for them through the checkout, and get out and take them back home. I don’t feel it is right to be compelled to pay for something to carry the groceries home in, just because they no longer meet some “standards” about micron thicknesses, that have nothing to do with PEOPLE’S health and safety.

I’m sorry a lot of people disagree with me so much they fling insults back at me, telling me to “get a life” and “build a bridge and get over it”, and be mocked and have my argument turned into a laughing stock and have my words twisted around to suit themselves.

Mysteryman Mysteryman 4:59 pm 10 Feb 12

p1 said :

Mysteryman said :

Banning the free supply of something that consumers are continuing to purchase and discard is certainly not the most effective way of dealing with waste. Regardless of your name calling, that’s what’s happening.

This is not what was happening. People were previously being supplies bags thinner then 35 microns at checkouts to carry their goods home in. The government have mandated that all bags supplies at checkouts for this purpose must now meet a standard (which means they must be thicker then 35 microns, amongst other things).

The decision to stop supplying bags at the checkout (or to charge for their supply) is one which the supermarkets have made for financial reasons to do with the cost of making bags to standard.

While some people are continuing to purchase bags, (a) some people aren’t, so less bags are being used and (b) the bags that are being purchased are now made to conform to the Australian Standard.

There is really only one thing in this whole thread I see worthy of real debate. That is – whether the advantage to the environment and society of less plastic bags being used outweighs the inconvenience and frustration that the change from thin free bags to thick 10c bags imposes on us all.

Personally, I think it is worth it.

You’re right. The ban isn’t on supplying free bags, just thin bags. My mistake.

p1 p1 4:37 pm 10 Feb 12

Mysteryman said :

Banning the free supply of something that consumers are continuing to purchase and discard is certainly not the most effective way of dealing with waste. Regardless of your name calling, that’s what’s happening.

This is not what was happening. People were previously being supplies bags thinner then 35 microns at checkouts to carry their goods home in. The government have mandated that all bags supplies at checkouts for this purpose must now meet a standard (which means they must be thicker then 35 microns, amongst other things).

The decision to stop supplying bags at the checkout (or to charge for their supply) is one which the supermarkets have made for financial reasons to do with the cost of making bags to standard.

While some people are continuing to purchase bags, (a) some people aren’t, so less bags are being used and (b) the bags that are being purchased are now made to conform to the Australian Standard.

There is really only one thing in this whole thread I see worthy of real debate. That is – whether the advantage to the environment and society of less plastic bags being used outweighs the inconvenience and frustration that the change from thin free bags to thick 10c bags imposes on us all.

Personally, I think it is worth it.

Mysteryman Mysteryman 4:09 pm 10 Feb 12

Jim Jones said :

Mysteryman said :

Learn to read what you’re responding to, and then maybe you’ll be in a credible position to comment on who does, or doesn’t, look like an arse. Right now, you’re just an example.[/quote>

If you actually think that ‘some people use some plastic bags as bin liners’ is an actual argument against the idea that the bag ban will reduce unnecessary consumption then you’re more stupid than I’ve given you credit for.

Crowing about reading comprehension is a (failed, unsurprisingly) attempt at distraction.

So what’s your argument in support of the ban, then? Do you have one? Apart from “I don’t agree with you so I’ll call you an idiot”. You never actually have any argument for any of the posts you criticise, besides calling people stupid and acting like you’re more intelligent than them. Most people move away from that behaviour after high school. Maybe you should, too.

Banning the free supply of something that consumers are continuing to purchase and discard is certainly not the most effective way of dealing with waste. Regardless of your name calling, that’s what’s happening.

bitzermaloney bitzermaloney 3:45 pm 10 Feb 12

Holden Caulfield said :

bitzermaloney said :

Jim Jones said :

If you really think that all the plastic bags were being used as bin liners, then I’ve got an awesome bridge to sell you.

The multicultural bridge?

That’s no good, with all the road closures nobody will be able to drive across it.

Given it was suppose to be a footbridge that’s probably a good thing. Also, given how many cars are in Civic Walk today it probably won’t stop them either.

bitzermaloney bitzermaloney 3:43 pm 10 Feb 12

KB1971 said :

bitzermaloney said :

Jim Jones said :

If you really think that all the plastic bags were being used as bin liners, then I’ve got an awesome bridge to sell you.

The multicultural bridge?

With food on a stick?

Naturally.

Really hope I can join the old chinese guy fishing for carp on it? Reckon he could do with an alternate to the noisey Commonwealth Ave bridge.

Jim Jones Jim Jones 3:32 pm 10 Feb 12

Mysteryman said :

Learn to read what you’re responding to, and then maybe you’ll be in a credible position to comment on who does, or doesn’t, look like an arse. Right now, you’re just an example.[/quote>

If you actually think that ‘some people use some plastic bags as bin liners’ is an actual argument against the idea that the bag ban will reduce unnecessary consumption then you’re more stupid than I’ve given you credit for.

Crowing about reading comprehension is a (failed, unsurprisingly) attempt at distraction.

davo101 davo101 2:27 pm 10 Feb 12

Innovation said :

I understood your correctly made point. I was just trying to keep it simple. Legally permitted bags cost more to produce. Ignoring any environmental justification, many are becoming aware of the true cost of producing these bags. Presumably this is leading to an increasing number of retailers (who can’t justify part or all of the production cost in any self promotion on the side of the bag) charging for these bags rather than giving them away.

By keeping it simple you are missing the main point of the original rant: Are you sick of having to pay for your own shopping bags these days because of the ACT Government’s Plastic Shopping Bag Ban?. The key point is who has decided to take away the free plastic bags and it is clear that it is the retailers that have decided it is fantastic idea to charge you 15-20 cents for a bag that only costs them less than 4 cents than the old ones they use to give away.

Mysteryman Mysteryman 2:15 pm 10 Feb 12

Jim Jones said :

Mysteryman said :

Jim Jones said :

Mysteryman said :

Jim Jones said :

Mr Gillespie said :

It’s not up to us to “set an example”!! If we want to set a rotten example and set a precedent showing that it is OK to cause unnecessary extra annoyances and inconveniences in people’s lives, then I want no part of that!

How about we set an example by not acting like spoilt, self-entitled jerkwads and instead try to reduce unnecessary consumption and waste?

Acting less like spoilt, self-entitled jerkwads is always good.

The new law doesn’t reduce unnecessary consumption in many cases as the free shopping bags were often used as bin liners, which now have to be purchased separately and still end up getting thrown in the garbage.

If you really think that all the plastic bags were being used as bin liners, then I’ve got an awesome bridge to sell you.

There’s a reason I said ” in many cases” and not “every single time”. Use the money from your bridge sale to buy books, and practice reading comprehension.

Ah, *some* bags are used for bin liners – what compelling support for your argument that the ban doesn’t reduce unnecessary consumption.

How about I reduce the price on that bridge just enough for you to buy a book on ‘how not to make a gigantic arse of yourself’.

Learn to read what you’re responding to, and then maybe you’ll be in a credible position to comment on who does, or doesn’t, look like an arse. Right now, you’re just an example.

Watson Watson 1:49 pm 10 Feb 12

I don’t think these laws make much of a difference. I still use as many plastic bags as I used to, only now I either pay for them at the check-out or I buy them on a roll to use as bin bags. Even though I do now often remember to take my own bag, it doesn’t make me feel like I am saving the environment at all. It just shows that I am more adaptable than I thought, but I am not sure how that helps in saving the whales.

But to mount a protest about it because it is inconvenient – and months after it came into force? Puh-lease! Move on.

PS: the only useful secret Santa present I ever got was when someone gave me a reusable shopping bag that folds into a tiny parcel and fits into my handbag. It still gets left on the kitchen table very regularly, but I feel so clever when I do get to use it. To put my roll of bin bags in.

Innovation Innovation 1:46 pm 10 Feb 12

davo101 said :

Innovation said :

demanding to be given free plastic bags (which effectively would be subsidised by other customers) when a Government has decided this should no longer be the case

Ah yes, the continuing myth that the government has decided that you can no longer be given a free bag. As I asked Mr G, where exactly in the act does it ban retailers from giving you a free bag?

I understood your correctly made point. I was just trying to keep it simple. Legally permitted bags cost more to produce. Ignoring any environmental justification, many are becoming aware of the true cost of producing these bags. Presumably this is leading to an increasing number of retailers (who can’t justify part or all of the production cost in any self promotion on the side of the bag) charging for these bags rather than giving them away.

colourful sydney racing identity colourful sydney racing identity 1:17 pm 10 Feb 12

If Mr Gillespie promises that the next plastic bag he recieves will be put over his head and attached around his neck via a rubber band for thirty minutes, I will gladly sign a petition for their reintroduction.

davo101 davo101 1:16 pm 10 Feb 12

Innovation said :

demanding to be given free plastic bags (which effectively would be subsidised by other customers) when a Government has decided this should no longer be the case

Ah yes, the continuing myth that the government has decided that you can no longer be given a free bag. As I asked Mr G, where exactly in the act does it ban retailers from giving you a free bag?

poetix poetix 12:44 pm 10 Feb 12

Thumper said :

Guinea Pigs on a stick?

Served in plastic bags?

http://www.zazzle.com.au/guinea_pig_shopping_spree_recipes_binder-127673839091063307

First buy your ingredients.

(Note lack of plastic bags.) (And flashing joke indicators.)

Innovation Innovation 12:17 pm 10 Feb 12

Mr G – I’ve reflected on your comments and you do have one good point. Like everyone, you do have a right to express an opinion about things. My main concern is if or when your opinions turn into negative actions that are not supported by a significant number of other people.

Wasting the time and money of shop owners or checkout staff is such a negative action. On a much smaller scale, demanding to be given free plastic bags (which effectively would be subsidised by other customers) when a Government has decided this should no longer be the case, is a similar negative action. While I don’t agree with your opinion, if you can get support for more positive ideas then I wish you luck.

JennD JennD 12:13 pm 10 Feb 12

Mr Gillespie, does your idea about your right to not be annoyed apply to all situations? Or just ones that are not really going to test you? If I am trying to meditate, and the next door neighbour’s baby is screaming (I have a right to peace and quiet in my own home), how shall I take of this? I’d like some of your enlightening ideas please.

Jim Jones Jim Jones 12:02 pm 10 Feb 12

Thumper said :

KB1971 said :

bitzermaloney said :

Jim Jones said :

If you really think that all the plastic bags were being used as bin liners, then I’ve got an awesome bridge to sell you.

The multicultural bridge?

With food on a stick?

Guinea Pigs on a stick?

Served in plastic bags?

Those fancy 35 micron bags no less!

Afterwards you can use the bag as a bin liner and be part of the Marxist Greenie conspiracy against people with severe self-entitlement-related anger issues.

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