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If you can’t tell when your neighbours are dead how will you be ready for the zombie apocalypse?

By johnboy 13 July 2011 27

ACT Policing and the ACT Ambulance have issued a combined plea for residents to look out for their elderly neighbours after a series of recent incidents.

In a recent incident a 57-year-old man was found deceased after several weeks in his Bonython home. He died of natural causes. It appears no-one attended his residence during this time.

In another incident, a 70-year-old Kambah man was found in very poor physical condition in his Kambah home after a visit by Centrelink officers on July 2. The man was transported the ACT Ambulance Service to The Canberra Hospital but died later that evening.

More recently, police, firefighters and ambulance attended a Curtin residence where an 89-year-old woman had fallen inside her house sometime in the previous day and was unable to summon help. Emergency services were required to force entry to the house to provide assistance.

Officer-in-Charge of Tuggeranong Police Station Sergeant Rod Anderson said that these recent examples call for checks on people’s welfare, particularly those more vulnerable in our community.

“Welfare checks are a regular part of police duties but we need Canberrans to keep an eye out for those vulnerable people in their immediate community who may, from time to time, need help,” Sergeant Anderson said.

“Emergency services are usually the first to attend such matters. What we don’t like to find when we arrive is a vulnerable or elderly person who is very sick, highly distressed or worse.

“If you have an elderly person that you know, is in your family or living alone next door, please make the effort to check on their welfare from time to time.

“From a police and emergency services perspective, that sense of connectedness to others in your immediate community — whether it’s within your apartment block or local area — can only make for a safer community.”

[Courtesy ACT Policing]

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27 Responses to
If you can’t tell when your neighbours are dead how will you be ready for the zombie apocalypse?
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LSWCHP 6:01 pm 16 Jul 11

Kalfour said :

There was a case in Sydney(?) recently where an old lady was found in her home… eight years (approx.) after she had died.
Apparently her sister-in-law called the police because they hadn’t heard from her in a while.

Jivrashia said :

Solution: SMS-enabled tea pots.

Elder people are certain to have a tea at least once an day, and when they do an SMS is sent to their carer (e.g. children) that tells them they are still alive.

I wasn’t sure if this was a serious suggestion or not… but it’s totally genius!
It won’t be so good when our generation gets old – too few of us drink tea.

The SMS-enabled wine glass would work for me. It would probably piss my carers off though, getting all those messages every day. 🙂

Kalfour 10:30 am 16 Jul 11

There was a case in Sydney(?) recently where an old lady was found in her home… eight years (approx.) after she had died.
Apparently her sister-in-law called the police because they hadn’t heard from her in a while.

Jivrashia said :

Solution: SMS-enabled tea pots.

Elder people are certain to have a tea at least once an day, and when they do an SMS is sent to their carer (e.g. children) that tells them they are still alive.

I wasn’t sure if this was a serious suggestion or not… but it’s totally genius!
It won’t be so good when our generation gets old – too few of us drink tea.

Calamity 9:00 am 15 Jul 11

Watson said :

Calamity said :

EvanJames said :

These elderly people must have all been childless, because one of the often-used justifications for having children is that They Will Take Care of You When You Are Old.

http://media.photobucket.com/image/Breeder%20Bingo/kamikazejoe_000/comics/breeder_bingo.jpg

It would be interesting to know though, does anyone reading here have elderly neighbours living alone, and have they tried to prevent this situation? Not being sanctimonious, but it would be interesting to see.

It certainly makes a good case for having collective communities of oldies, living in their own places but where they are all in the same circumstances, keeping an eye on each other.

Funny you should ask! A few weeks ago as I was walking home from the local shops I came across an elderly lady desperately trying to get her bin out to the curb (walking frame in one hand, bin in the other, shuffling at snail’s pace). This was evidentally a massive effort for her so obviously I ran up to give her a hand, which she was very thankful for and breathed (exhausted!) ‘It’s just so awkward!!’ Anyway, I felt absolutely horrible for her afterwards, and since then I try to pop her bin in/out when I see it needs doing.

To get to the point I have been away for a few days, and driving past her place last night I noticed the bin was still on the curb a full day after bin collection – In light of all of these stories I resolved to check back again tonight and if it is still on the curb I’m going to knock on her door to check she is okay (even though she will have no memory of who I am, I’m sure!). This is something I never would have considered doing before reading the recent articles… So, there’s a nice knock-on effect for you!

You might want to help to get her signed up for the bin assistance service too? Search http://www.canberraconnect.act.gov.au. You can fill out the application online.

That is very helpful to know!! I’ll try to catch her again next bin day and ask if she’s interested in this 🙂 Thanks!!

Violet68 7:03 pm 14 Jul 11

Watson said :

Violet68 said :

carnardly said :

I know. I have spent many a night with people and the CAT team at the hospital.

I also know not to get myself in any further potentially violent incidents.

I wasn’t asking people to get physically involved. Just make a call.

I do – and so do lots of others. To the police. Which is the only service that I know for sure operates 24/7.

That’s no excuse. No wonder it’s so often dealt with as a criminal issue. The Police can’t always respond immediately and if the onus isn’t put on the health system, then Police services are going to be tied up unnecessarily.
Direct quote from ACT Health Website.

“The Crisis Assessment and Treatment Team (CATT) provides a 24-hour, seven day a week service used for assessment and treatment of mentally ill people in crisis situations.
Call the CATT Mental Health Triage Service on 1800 629 354 (24 hour service) or (02) 6205 1065”.

Any one of our neighbours could easily become invisible – no matter what their age.

Watson 3:12 pm 14 Jul 11

Violet68 said :

carnardly said :

I know. I have spent many a night with people and the CAT team at the hospital.

I also know not to get myself in any further potentially violent incidents.

I wasn’t asking people to get physically involved. Just make a call.

I do – and so do lots of others. To the police. Which is the only service that I know for sure operates 24/7.

Violet68 said :

colourful sydney racing identity said :

Jivrashia said :

Solution: SMS-enabled tea pots.

Elder people are certain to have a tea at least once an day, and when they do an SMS is sent to their carer (e.g. children) that tells them they are still alive.

that is actually a brilliant idea.

I thought so too. You could make it like a voice call teapot where they could actually see and talk to you as well.

No, that is sounding a little too ‘Get Smart’ for me.

Violet68 2:41 pm 14 Jul 11

carnardly said :

I know. I have spent many a night with people and the CAT team at the hospital.

I also know not to get myself in any further potentially violent incidents.

I wasn’t asking people to get physically involved. Just make a call.

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