Skip to content Skip to main navigation

News

Recruiting experts in
Accountancy & Finance

If you can’t tell when your neighbours are dead how will you be ready for the zombie apocalypse?

By johnboy - 13 July 2011 27

ACT Policing and the ACT Ambulance have issued a combined plea for residents to look out for their elderly neighbours after a series of recent incidents.

In a recent incident a 57-year-old man was found deceased after several weeks in his Bonython home. He died of natural causes. It appears no-one attended his residence during this time.

In another incident, a 70-year-old Kambah man was found in very poor physical condition in his Kambah home after a visit by Centrelink officers on July 2. The man was transported the ACT Ambulance Service to The Canberra Hospital but died later that evening.

More recently, police, firefighters and ambulance attended a Curtin residence where an 89-year-old woman had fallen inside her house sometime in the previous day and was unable to summon help. Emergency services were required to force entry to the house to provide assistance.

Officer-in-Charge of Tuggeranong Police Station Sergeant Rod Anderson said that these recent examples call for checks on people’s welfare, particularly those more vulnerable in our community.

“Welfare checks are a regular part of police duties but we need Canberrans to keep an eye out for those vulnerable people in their immediate community who may, from time to time, need help,” Sergeant Anderson said.

“Emergency services are usually the first to attend such matters. What we don’t like to find when we arrive is a vulnerable or elderly person who is very sick, highly distressed or worse.

“If you have an elderly person that you know, is in your family or living alone next door, please make the effort to check on their welfare from time to time.

“From a police and emergency services perspective, that sense of connectedness to others in your immediate community — whether it’s within your apartment block or local area — can only make for a safer community.”

[Courtesy ACT Policing]

What’s Your opinion?


Post a comment
Please login to post your comments, or connect with
27 Responses to
If you can’t tell when your neighbours are dead how will you be ready for the zombie apocalypse?
Violet68 1:15 pm 14 Jul 11

s-s-a said :

We have a neighbour in her 70s living alone. She usually lets us know if she is going away. If I didn’t see her curtains open, or her car, or the paper was left on the nature strip for two days running, I would probably check on her. If she was inside and something happened she needed urgent medical help and couldn’t get to the phone, I probably wouldn’t realise anything was amiss soon enough.

My Mum is in her 70s and lives alone in Sydney. I know she always keeps her mobile on her when she is outside gardening. But likewise if she fell in the house and couldn’t reach the phone…

There are two other people (non-seniors) in my street who live alone. Yes I would check up on them if it was obvious there was nobody around (eg mail box overflowing).

It’s lovely that there’s so much support for taking care of elderly neighbours. Apparently neighbours with mental illness are not so deserving.

s-s-a 8:59 am 14 Jul 11

We have a neighbour in her 70s living alone. She usually lets us know if she is going away. If I didn’t see her curtains open, or her car, or the paper was left on the nature strip for two days running, I would probably check on her. If she was inside and something happened she needed urgent medical help and couldn’t get to the phone, I probably wouldn’t realise anything was amiss soon enough.

My Mum is in her 70s and lives alone in Sydney. I know she always keeps her mobile on her when she is outside gardening. But likewise if she fell in the house and couldn’t reach the phone…

There are two other people (non-seniors) in my street who live alone. Yes I would check up on them if it was obvious there was nobody around (eg mail box overflowing).

LSWCHP 9:59 pm 13 Jul 11

Calamity said :

EvanJames said :

These elderly people must have all been childless, because one of the often-used justifications for having children is that They Will Take Care of You When You Are Old.

http://media.photobucket.com/image/Breeder%20Bingo/kamikazejoe_000/comics/breeder_bingo.jpg

It would be interesting to know though, does anyone reading here have elderly neighbours living alone, and have they tried to prevent this situation? Not being sanctimonious, but it would be interesting to see.

It certainly makes a good case for having collective communities of oldies, living in their own places but where they are all in the same circumstances, keeping an eye on each other.

Funny you should ask! A few weeks ago as I was walking home from the local shops I came across an elderly lady desperately trying to get her bin out to the curb (walking frame in one hand, bin in the other, shuffling at snail’s pace). This was evidentally a massive effort for her so obviously I ran up to give her a hand, which she was very thankful for and breathed (exhausted!) ‘It’s just so awkward!!’ Anyway, I felt absolutely horrible for her afterwards, and since then I try to pop her bin in/out when I see it needs doing.

To get to the point I have been away for a few days, and driving past her place last night I noticed the bin was still on the curb a full day after bin collection – In light of all of these stories I resolved to check back again tonight and if it is still on the curb I’m going to knock on her door to check she is okay (even though she will have no memory of who I am, I’m sure!). This is something I never would have considered doing before reading the recent articles… So, there’s a nice knock-on effect for you!

My hat is off to you Calamity, Good on You! This is the sort of thing that restores my faith in the people in our community.

The Frots 7:12 pm 13 Jul 11

Calamity said :

EvanJames said :

These elderly people must have all been childless, because one of the often-used justifications for having children is that They Will Take Care of You When You Are Old.

http://media.photobucket.com/image/Breeder%20Bingo/kamikazejoe_000/comics/breeder_bingo.jpg

It would be interesting to know though, does anyone reading here have elderly neighbours living alone, and have they tried to prevent this situation? Not being sanctimonious, but it would be interesting to see.

It certainly makes a good case for having collective communities of oldies, living in their own places but where they are all in the same circumstances, keeping an eye on each other.

Funny you should ask! A few weeks ago as I was walking home from the local shops I came across an elderly lady desperately trying to get her bin out to the curb (walking frame in one hand, bin in the other, shuffling at snail’s pace). This was evidentally a massive effort for her so obviously I ran up to give her a hand, which she was very thankful for and breathed (exhausted!) ‘It’s just so awkward!!’ Anyway, I felt absolutely horrible for her afterwards, and since then I try to pop her bin in/out when I see it needs doing.

To get to the point I have been away for a few days, and driving past her place last night I noticed the bin was still on the curb a full day after bin collection – In light of all of these stories I resolved to check back again tonight and if it is still on the curb I’m going to knock on her door to check she is okay (even though she will have no memory of who I am, I’m sure!). This is something I never would have considered doing before reading the recent articles… So, there’s a nice knock-on effect for you!

Really well done – it does make a difference.

Violet68 7:03 pm 13 Jul 11

It certainly makes a good case for having collective communities of oldies, living in their own places but where they are all in the same circumstances, keeping an eye on each other.

Housing ACT has been in the process of relocating older public housing tenants who want to downsize into fantastic new complexes just for elderly people. I’ve only had dealings with one but the sense of the new community developing there is very positive. They truly do look out for each other, services can be bought in to provide support like Telecross and Vitacall (if they want them), the majority are very social and there is a community room and garden which is going to go along way to encourage social connections and friendships, the AFP have been very supportive around community safety and the local shops are benefiting from all the new business. It’s a win win situation.

Watson 5:51 pm 13 Jul 11

Calamity said :

EvanJames said :

These elderly people must have all been childless, because one of the often-used justifications for having children is that They Will Take Care of You When You Are Old.

http://media.photobucket.com/image/Breeder%20Bingo/kamikazejoe_000/comics/breeder_bingo.jpg

It would be interesting to know though, does anyone reading here have elderly neighbours living alone, and have they tried to prevent this situation? Not being sanctimonious, but it would be interesting to see.

It certainly makes a good case for having collective communities of oldies, living in their own places but where they are all in the same circumstances, keeping an eye on each other.

Funny you should ask! A few weeks ago as I was walking home from the local shops I came across an elderly lady desperately trying to get her bin out to the curb (walking frame in one hand, bin in the other, shuffling at snail’s pace). This was evidentally a massive effort for her so obviously I ran up to give her a hand, which she was very thankful for and breathed (exhausted!) ‘It’s just so awkward!!’ Anyway, I felt absolutely horrible for her afterwards, and since then I try to pop her bin in/out when I see it needs doing.

To get to the point I have been away for a few days, and driving past her place last night I noticed the bin was still on the curb a full day after bin collection – In light of all of these stories I resolved to check back again tonight and if it is still on the curb I’m going to knock on her door to check she is okay (even though she will have no memory of who I am, I’m sure!). This is something I never would have considered doing before reading the recent articles… So, there’s a nice knock-on effect for you!

You might want to help to get her signed up for the bin assistance service too? Search http://www.canberraconnect.act.gov.au. You can fill out the application online.

damien haas 5:34 pm 13 Jul 11

Good on you Calamity. Its these small gestures that are the true glue of our society.

Calamity 4:19 pm 13 Jul 11

EvanJames said :

These elderly people must have all been childless, because one of the often-used justifications for having children is that They Will Take Care of You When You Are Old.

http://media.photobucket.com/image/Breeder%20Bingo/kamikazejoe_000/comics/breeder_bingo.jpg

It would be interesting to know though, does anyone reading here have elderly neighbours living alone, and have they tried to prevent this situation? Not being sanctimonious, but it would be interesting to see.

It certainly makes a good case for having collective communities of oldies, living in their own places but where they are all in the same circumstances, keeping an eye on each other.

Funny you should ask! A few weeks ago as I was walking home from the local shops I came across an elderly lady desperately trying to get her bin out to the curb (walking frame in one hand, bin in the other, shuffling at snail’s pace). This was evidentally a massive effort for her so obviously I ran up to give her a hand, which she was very thankful for and breathed (exhausted!) ‘It’s just so awkward!!’ Anyway, I felt absolutely horrible for her afterwards, and since then I try to pop her bin in/out when I see it needs doing.

To get to the point I have been away for a few days, and driving past her place last night I noticed the bin was still on the curb a full day after bin collection – In light of all of these stories I resolved to check back again tonight and if it is still on the curb I’m going to knock on her door to check she is okay (even though she will have no memory of who I am, I’m sure!). This is something I never would have considered doing before reading the recent articles… So, there’s a nice knock-on effect for you!

Jivrashia 2:36 pm 13 Jul 11

Solution: SMS-enabled tea pots.

Elder people are certain to have a tea at least once an day, and when they do an SMS is sent to their carer (e.g. children) that tells them they are still alive.

EvanJames 2:20 pm 13 Jul 11

These elderly people must have all been childless, because one of the often-used justifications for having children is that They Will Take Care of You When You Are Old.

http://media.photobucket.com/image/Breeder%20Bingo/kamikazejoe_000/comics/breeder_bingo.jpg

It would be interesting to know though, does anyone reading here have elderly neighbours living alone, and have they tried to prevent this situation? Not being sanctimonious, but it would be interesting to see.

It certainly makes a good case for having collective communities of oldies, living in their own places but where they are all in the same circumstances, keeping an eye on each other.

JessP 2:14 pm 13 Jul 11

I dont think a 57 year old man is old!!

Watson 1:31 pm 13 Jul 11

It is indeed very sad that there are people out there who don’t seem to have anyone caring enough about them to check on them regularly.

(But that title did make me laugh out loud!)

The Frots 11:30 am 13 Jul 11

kschoey said :

It is really sad. The Red Cross actually has a fantastic program – Telecross to stop these sorts of things from happening. Volunteers call a person at the same time each day to make sure they are ok. If the phone isn’t answered within 30 mins, you call the Red Cross and they will send someone around to the house to check on the person. If I had elderly neighbours with no relatives, I’d be encouraging them to sign up.

Good post – hope that it’s used more.

kschoey 11:22 am 13 Jul 11

It is really sad. The Red Cross actually has a fantastic program – Telecross to stop these sorts of things from happening. Volunteers call a person at the same time each day to make sure they are ok. If the phone isn’t answered within 30 mins, you call the Red Cross and they will send someone around to the house to check on the person. If I had elderly neighbours with no relatives, I’d be encouraging them to sign up.

The Frots 11:07 am 13 Jul 11

This is really sad – people can just become ‘invisible’ that easily.

Related Articles

CBR Tweets

Sign up to our newsletter

Top
Copyright © 2017 Riot ACT Holdings Pty Ltd. All rights reserved.
www.the-riotact.com | www.b2bmagazine.com.au | www.thisiscanberra.com

Search across the site