Skip to content Skip to main navigation

News

Skilled legal advice with
accessible & personal attention

Improvements in indigenous youth detention and other crime statistics

By johnboy - 13 August 2013 6

Simon Corbell brings news of better statistics related to indigenous people held in juvenile detention:

Mr Corbell welcomed the findings of the June 2013 Criminal Justice Statistical Profile which was tabled in the ACT Legislative Assembly today.

“In the 12 months to June 2013, there were 53 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander remands and committals at the Bimberi Youth Justice Centre, compared to 98 in the 12 months to June 2012,” Mr Corbell said.

“Year on year, that’s a 46% decrease – a very encouraging result which reflects the effort across governmentto engage with, and provide improved services, to indigenous youth.

“ACT Policing has focused its attention on the use of cautions and warnings; it has increased its referral of young people to restorative justice conferencing; and the After Hours Bail Support Service which diverts young people from custody.

The other numbers Simon wanted to share were:

— Robbery, extortion and related offences decreased by 35%;

— motor vehicle theft decreased by 27%;

— sexual offences decreased by15%;

— burglary/break and enter dropped by 14%;

— public order offences decreased by12%;

— weapons offences decreased by10%; and,

— assaults decreased by 9%

Before we all wear out our back scratchers though it’s worth noting crime is disappearing all over the world as a result of DNA testing and ubiquitous cameras amongst other things. The Economist has more on this if you’re interested.

What’s Your opinion?


Post a comment
Please login to post your comments, or connect with
6 Responses to
Improvements in indigenous youth detention and other crime statistics
IrishPete 1:21 pm 14 Aug 13

RedDogInCan said :

In other news (strangely not mentioned by Simon), the Bureau of Crime Statistics and Research latest report mentions that robberies in the ACT had increased by 11% in the period 2001 to 2009, despite falling nationally by 49%.

And? So robbery increased up to 4 years ago and now it’s decreasing? What’s your point? Anyway, did Canberra’s population perchance increase by 9% between 2001 and 2009? If so, the increase in robbery just reflected an increase in population.

Canberra’s more serious crime figures tend to be pretty rubbery because of the small numbers of robberies and the like, so are subject to significant random fluctuations (which probably partly relate to who is in prison, Queensland.etc.)

IP

IrishPete 1:18 pm 14 Aug 13

web_guy said :

Simple maths – fewer police on the beat = fewer apprehensions = lower lock up rate = more juvenile crime. A slap on the wrist doesn’t deter crime. Ask any of our hard working police and they will (maybe not) tell you there is little point responding to juvenile crime because of lax consequences for such crime, some very serious. Add to this the lack of addressing serious mental health issues among this demographic, you can see why what is being poorly attempted just isn’t working.

but the post shows decreasing crime, so your post doesn’t make sense.

I am as sceptical as the next person about government stats on crime, but you need to have some coherent reason to dispute them.

IP

Tooks 12:12 pm 14 Aug 13

web_guy said :

Simple maths – fewer police on the beat = fewer apprehensions = lower lock up rate = more juvenile crime. A slap on the wrist doesn’t deter crime. Ask any of our hard working police and they will (maybe not) tell you there is little point responding to juvenile crime because of lax consequences for such crime, some very serious. Add to this the lack of addressing serious mental health issues among this demographic, you can see why what is being poorly attempted just isn’t working.

There wouldn’t be fewer apprehensions, but more of a focus on restorative justice, criminal cautions etc rather than detention.

web_guy 10:20 pm 13 Aug 13

Simple maths – fewer police on the beat = fewer apprehensions = lower lock up rate = more juvenile crime. A slap on the wrist doesn’t deter crime. Ask any of our hard working police and they will (maybe not) tell you there is little point responding to juvenile crime because of lax consequences for such crime, some very serious. Add to this the lack of addressing serious mental health issues among this demographic, you can see why what is being poorly attempted just isn’t working.

RedDogInCan 9:33 pm 13 Aug 13

In other news (strangely not mentioned by Simon), the Bureau of Crime Statistics and Research latest report mentions that robberies in the ACT had increased by 11% in the period 2001 to 2009, despite falling nationally by 49%.

bundah 8:01 pm 13 Aug 13

So we have the clever use of technology, predictive policing and rehab as factors which are having a positive impact on reducing crime. Simon must be ecstatic and perhaps even gloating?

Related Articles

CBR Tweets

Sign up to our newsletter

Top
Copyright © 2017 Riot ACT Holdings Pty Ltd. All rights reserved.
www.the-riotact.com | www.b2bmagazine.com.au | www.thisiscanberra.com

Search across the site