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Jim’s mowing takes a red hot shot at taking down a cyclist

By johnboy 26 June 2012 264

tcol1979 has posted this to YouTube with the following note:

Call Jim’s Mowing any time for a hit-n-run…

The driver of this Holden Commodore didn’t even stop after side-swiping the cyclist.

The cyclist was wearing high-visibility clothing compliant with both “AS/NZS 4602(1999) High Visibility Safety Garments” and “AS/NZS 1906.4(1997) High Visibility Materials for Safety Garments”

Extended footage is also available showing that prior to this incident, the traffic had slowed through roadworks such that the red VW Polo was just ahead of the cyclist for a considerable time, following by the black Mercedes and of course, the Holden Commodore – the driver of the Holden Commodore was following the cyclist for quite some time through the roadworks and has absolutely NO excuse not to have seen the cyclist.

It took place on the Cotter Road, Weston.

cyclist losing control


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Jim’s mowing takes a red hot shot at taking down a cyclist
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NoImRight 2:05 pm 28 Jun 12

Whats the etiquette on bikes dinging their little bells telling pedestrians to get out of their way? Im not sure how much moral outrage is appropriate?

Antagonist 1:57 pm 28 Jun 12

Holden Caulfield said :

fromthecapital said :

I had an experience this morning on Adelaide ave. I was using the green strip at deakin northbound. Towards the end I noticed a white commodore ute slow for me. Given I had taken about 2.61 seconds from his journey I waved to thank him for slowing. He waved and smiled back.

No one in hospital or gaol as a result.

A white Commodore? Lies! 😉

+1. I call bull**it.

Postalgeek 1:48 pm 28 Jun 12

dazzab said :

That rider would do well to take a page from how motorcyclists stay alive using ‘road craft’.

He has a mirror on his handlebars so he should have known what was behind him. The car is signalling that he needs to exit left. But the rider actually speeds up when he could have easily created a gap for the car. All he had to do was slow down just a bit and he would have avoided contact with the trailer.

Forget about who is at fault, a bad driver or in the wrong. When you are on a two wheeled vehicle the object is to stay alive and the best way to do that is to stay aware and as far from vehicles as possible. The video indicates that the rider didn’t do either of these. So good on him for being in the right, it’s always great to say that from a hospital bed.

I do not believe for one second that had it been you on the bike you could’ve anticipated and avoided that act of bastardry. In fact, I think you would’ve gone down hard, making a little splat sound when you hit the road.

aceofspades 1:24 pm 28 Jun 12

KB1971 said :

aceofspades said :

You may not have to indicate by putting out your arm but as I find on a motorbike eye contact and head checks go along way. If cyclists rarely indicate to begin with and don’t even look to see if there is any danger it is easy to assume they will be turning away from the traffic. As you cannot see the rider in this video you can’t make a judgement on whether he took sufficient responsibility for his own safety or simply kept his head down peddling as fast as he could like many cyclists do blindly riding into an intersection. This by no means condones the actions of the Jims Mowing vehicle but it is a two way street (no pun intended).

In this case the rider does not have to. He has a lane all to himself while travelling through the intersection. The car drivers have to give way.

Look at the line markings, there is a broken give way dash, same is in a T intersection with a give way sign.

While there may not be a physical “sign”, the road makrings tell the road users what to do. In this case the rider should be assured that he has right of way no matter what. These lanes dont exist on the Monaro Hwy, the cyclist would be switching from the breakdown lane to the turn lane so maybe they should signal but it is semantics.

On the looking thing, you can hear when a vehicle is beside you so you are aware that they are there without looking. I dont look over my shoulder all the time, especially if it is busy such as on Adelaide Ave, I would never stop & probably stack :).

Granted, in this case I have no hesitation in saying Jim’s an inconsiderate ar$e hole. Legally speaking the rider does not need to indicate. Even though the rider does not need to indicate or head check as he may know where the cars are, but a head check does help the car drivers know that the cyclists intentions are to cross the lane. If it were me on a bicycle, I would not trust anyone regardless of the law. I don’t trust an indicator either, I wait until I see a vehicle commence the turn before I pull out, especially on a bike.

I do find myself slowing down to give way to a bicycle if I need to cross either a bike lane or a shoulder because from past experience they do seem to ride on through regardless and they do seem to be unaware of their surroundings. Maybe it is just me but I don’t want to kill anyone.

EvanJames 1:19 pm 28 Jun 12

Very Busy said :

It’s a sad reflection on the general quality and attitude of Canberra drivers that so many responses in this thread can somehow justify the actions of the driver of the Commodore and trailer.

+1. There’s no excuse, no justification for what he did, other than excessive slob-like-ness. You’re not allowed to drive through people even if you think they have no right to be there.

It’s like the morons who speed up when they see you walking across “their” road. gob-smackingly stupid.

OpenYourMind 12:50 pm 28 Jun 12

There’s a wonderful, yet sad, irony that so many pro-car people posting on here demonstrate a lack of knowledge of road rules or a borderline violent/dangerous attitude. Many of these people should not be driving a motor car.

I’ve been a truck driver, taxi driver, cyclist, motorcyclist and car driver at various times. In operating these vehicles, cyclists are the least of my concerns. I would suggest that if you find people on bikes to be a challenge to you when you are driving a motor vehicle then you may need to re-assess your ability to drive. It’s really not that hard to be patient, give a bike a bit of space and understand the road rules pertaining to bicycles. If you can’t do this, then walking or a bus may be a better choice for you.

In other posts I have spoken of autonomous cars quickly becoming a reality. If you watch a few of the google videos, you’ll see the google self driving car cope easily with bicycles. The google car even spotted and stopped for a person running out onto the road without looking. If you are driving at a reasonable speed and paying attention to your driving a bicycle should be the least of your concerns.

PantsMan 12:35 pm 28 Jun 12

I think the moral of the story is that no-good greenie cyclists should not get in the way of real self-employed Australians in Holdens trying to make an honest living cash-in-hand.

Has the Jim’s Group responded to this?

KB1971 12:10 pm 28 Jun 12

aceofspades said :

You may not have to indicate by putting out your arm but as I find on a motorbike eye contact and head checks go along way. If cyclists rarely indicate to begin with and don’t even look to see if there is any danger it is easy to assume they will be turning away from the traffic. As you cannot see the rider in this video you can’t make a judgement on whether he took sufficient responsibility for his own safety or simply kept his head down peddling as fast as he could like many cyclists do blindly riding into an intersection. This by no means condones the actions of the Jims Mowing vehicle but it is a two way street (no pun intended).

In this case the rider does not have to. He has a lane all to himself while travelling through the intersection. The car drivers have to give way.

Look at the line markings, there is a broken give way dash, same is in a T intersection with a give way sign.

While there may not be a physical “sign”, the road makrings tell the road users what to do. In this case the rider should be assured that he has right of way no matter what. These lanes dont exist on the Monaro Hwy, the cyclist would be switching from the breakdown lane to the turn lane so maybe they should signal but it is semantics.

On the looking thing, you can hear when a vehicle is beside you so you are aware that they are there without looking. I dont look over my shoulder all the time, especially if it is busy such as on Adelaide Ave, I would never stop & probably stack :).

birder 12:03 pm 28 Jun 12

I also find it absolutely shocking that so many people are defending the poor driving. I see lots of cyclists do stupid things – I work at ANU and they race around the footpaths so that pedestrians have to jump out their way at times. I also see them race across crosswalks even though they are supposed to dismount.

Nonetheless, even with these negative experiences with cyclists, I would have to be brain dead to say that the driver of the vehicle/trailer is not at fault here. The cyclist has every right to be in the green lane.

Any word from Jim’s mowing or whether the cyclist is taking this to court? They certainly should!

Holden Caulfield 11:57 am 28 Jun 12

fromthecapital said :

I had an experience this morning on Adelaide ave. I was using the green strip at deakin northbound. Towards the end I noticed a white commodore ute slow for me. Given I had taken about 2.61 seconds from his journey I waved to thank him for slowing. He waved and smiled back.

No one in hospital or gaol as a result.

A white Commodore? Lies! 😉

Very Busy 11:43 am 28 Jun 12

It’s a sad reflection on the general quality and attitude of Canberra drivers that so many responses in this thread can somehow justify the actions of the driver of the Commodore and trailer.

aceofspades 11:36 am 28 Jun 12

helium said :

aceofspades said :

Grrrr said :

aceofspades said :

I don’t think the concern is the money or insurance. Bicycles have no indicators, brake-lights, mirrors and are not required to go through the same roadworthy stringency that other vehicles do. Combine that with the fact that it is extremely rare to see a cyclist indicate their intentions or even look (head check) and be aware of other vehicles.

I was travelling north on Monaro Hwy trying to turn left onto Mugga Lane. A cyclist was travelling on the shoulder and evidently wanted to travel straight ahead, however I had no way of knowing this at the time. I had no choice other than to slow down behind the cyclist and wait to find out his intentions. Luckily for him as he almost expected the right of way as he left the shoulder and rode across the left turn only lane without even checking or indicating his intentions. The situation was very similar to this video except he was on the shoulder and not a designated bicycle lane. I remember wondering what would have happened if I wasn’t so cautious and who would have been at fault if an accident had occurred.

I also do not remember being advised as a driver about these green cycle lanes. Did I miss an advertising campaign that lets me know how to approach or behave around these lanes? Really, I think the only reason car drivers give way is because they don’t want to kill somebody and any cyclist that takes this for granted is putting thier life at risk.

Straight away a cyclist wanting to rant and rave. Firstly I have nothing against cyclists on the road and have never even come close to hitting one. I am never impatient on the road and drive as if I have all day to get where I want to go. I give way to cyclists on bicycle lanes but do wonder about them leaving the shoulder without even looking for traffic.

All I have done here is pointed out some things that make situations more dangerous then they need to be. I am not interested in what is legal and what is not, all I am interested in is what is safe and what is not. It is safe for cyclists to at least try and indicate their intentions, which in my opinion does not happen often enough. Perhaps that is because there are too many impatient drivers giving them a hard time so that it generates resentment, who knows? Whatever the case, even though as a pedestrian I have the “right-of-way” at a pedestrian crossing I do not walk blindly out in front cars until I have clear indication they are going to stop. I look after my own well being and safely cross the road, as I would on a bicycle.

Whilst bicycles have no indicators, brake-lights, mirrors, the road rules cater for that. Cyclists have an very keen personal interest in the roadworthiness of their bicycles. Many road cyclists do have mirrors that you may not observe. But I agree that some don’t check their surrounds correctly

Not sure how you indicate an intention to go straight ahead, agree cyclists should indicate change of direction by law and when prudent for their safety, although not very useful at night.

“Did I miss an advertising campaign that lets me know how to approach or behave around these lanes?” Yes you did, several years ago, leaflets, newspaper advertisements and television as well. Drivers are giving way because they probably know the road rules.

“I am not interested in what is legal and what is not”, well perhaps you should be esp if you want to make comments, thare are many bicycle specific rules that I would suggest most motorists are not aware of and that in itself leads to the incorrect assertion that rules are being broken, increasing conflict.

I was not saying I am totally oblivious to the road rules just that they act as a guide only and safety takes priority. Regardless of who has right of way all motorists should slow down and be prepared for anything at an intersection. Safety, common sense and acting on the side of caution overrides everything. I ride a motorbike and do so extremely defensively as was taught on the required courses to obtain a licence.

If I did miss an advertising campaign then that just goes to show it was not extensive enough however as per last paragraph it does not stop me from abiding by the road rules.

You may not have to indicate by putting out your arm but as I find on a motorbike eye contact and head checks go along way. If cyclists rarely indicate to begin with and don’t even look to see if there is any danger it is easy to assume they will be turning away from the traffic. As you cannot see the rider in this video you can’t make a judgement on whether he took sufficient responsibility for his own safety or simply kept his head down peddling as fast as he could like many cyclists do blindly riding into an intersection. This by no means condones the actions of the Jims Mowing vehicle but it is a two way street (no pun intended).

p1 11:35 am 28 Jun 12

rosscoact said :

angrymotorist1 said :

Yeah, but the cyclist had no right to be on the road in the first place, because he hasn’t paid any rego.

a blatant troll

Effective though.

HenryBG 11:14 am 28 Jun 12

fromthecapital said :

I had an experience this morning on Adelaide ave. I was using the green strip at deakin northbound. Towards the end I noticed a white commodore ute slow for me. Given I had taken about 2.61 seconds from his journey I waved to thank him for slowing. He waved and smiled back.

No one in hospital or gaol as a result.

Shocking.

fromthecapital 11:01 am 28 Jun 12

helium said :

angrymotorist1 said :

Yeah, but the cyclist had no right to be on the road in the first place, because he hasn’t paid any rego.

Apart from the fact the LAW says he has every RIGHT to be there AND is encouraged (forced) by the ACT network of cycling. He also likely has 3rd party insurance, if a Pedal Power member.

He does pay rego on his car (known from his youtube post), as do most cyclists. And payroll/income taxes, and rates, and GST, etc…(because we know that rego does not pay for road construction and maint, predominately insurance)

In many cases for on-road cycle lanes there is little or no additional cost (mostly paint and signs) as breakdown lanes and shoulders MUST be (or already are) constructed to be compliant with design standards.

If you are after persons with no RIGHT to be on the road then start with Rego dodging motorists (800 caught per year), those with no or suspended licences

Lets not forget those who permanently reside in ACT with interstate rego not contributing to our rego burden.

I think you missed the tone of this post

helium 10:47 am 28 Jun 12

aceofspades said :

Grrrr said :

aceofspades said :

I don’t think the concern is the money or insurance. Bicycles have no indicators, brake-lights, mirrors and are not required to go through the same roadworthy stringency that other vehicles do. Combine that with the fact that it is extremely rare to see a cyclist indicate their intentions or even look (head check) and be aware of other vehicles.

I was travelling north on Monaro Hwy trying to turn left onto Mugga Lane. A cyclist was travelling on the shoulder and evidently wanted to travel straight ahead, however I had no way of knowing this at the time. I had no choice other than to slow down behind the cyclist and wait to find out his intentions. Luckily for him as he almost expected the right of way as he left the shoulder and rode across the left turn only lane without even checking or indicating his intentions. The situation was very similar to this video except he was on the shoulder and not a designated bicycle lane. I remember wondering what would have happened if I wasn’t so cautious and who would have been at fault if an accident had occurred.

I also do not remember being advised as a driver about these green cycle lanes. Did I miss an advertising campaign that lets me know how to approach or behave around these lanes? Really, I think the only reason car drivers give way is because they don’t want to kill somebody and any cyclist that takes this for granted is putting thier life at risk.

Straight away a cyclist wanting to rant and rave. Firstly I have nothing against cyclists on the road and have never even come close to hitting one. I am never impatient on the road and drive as if I have all day to get where I want to go. I give way to cyclists on bicycle lanes but do wonder about them leaving the shoulder without even looking for traffic.

All I have done here is pointed out some things that make situations more dangerous then they need to be. I am not interested in what is legal and what is not, all I am interested in is what is safe and what is not. It is safe for cyclists to at least try and indicate their intentions, which in my opinion does not happen often enough. Perhaps that is because there are too many impatient drivers giving them a hard time so that it generates resentment, who knows? Whatever the case, even though as a pedestrian I have the “right-of-way” at a pedestrian crossing I do not walk blindly out in front cars until I have clear indication they are going to stop. I look after my own well being and safely cross the road, as I would on a bicycle.

Whilst bicycles have no indicators, brake-lights, mirrors, the road rules cater for that. Cyclists have an very keen personal interest in the roadworthiness of their bicycles. Many road cyclists do have mirrors that you may not observe. But I agree that some don’t check their surrounds correctly

Not sure how you indicate an intention to go straight ahead, agree cyclists should indicate change of direction by law and when prudent for their safety, although not very useful at night.

“Did I miss an advertising campaign that lets me know how to approach or behave around these lanes?” Yes you did, several years ago, leaflets, newspaper advertisements and television as well. Drivers are giving way because they probably know the road rules.

“I am not interested in what is legal and what is not”, well perhaps you should be esp if you want to make comments, thare are many bicycle specific rules that I would suggest most motorists are not aware of and that in itself leads to the incorrect assertion that rules are being broken, increasing conflict.

carnardly 10:44 am 28 Jun 12

I remember ads being shown regularly on TV when the bike lanes were introduced on many main roads. They showed cyclists and drivers sharing the road with the reminders for drivers to give way to cyclists on the green stripes.

Maybe you didn’t remember, or didn’t live there then.

fromthecapital 10:43 am 28 Jun 12

I had an experience this morning on Adelaide ave. I was using the green strip at deakin northbound. Towards the end I noticed a white commodore ute slow for me. Given I had taken about 2.61 seconds from his journey I waved to thank him for slowing. He waved and smiled back.

No one in hospital or gaol as a result.

KB1971 10:42 am 28 Jun 12

aceofspades said :

All I have done here is pointed out some things that make situations more dangerous then they need to be. I am not interested in what is legal and what is not, all I am interested in is what is safe and what is not. It is safe for cyclists to at least try and indicate their intentions, which in my opinion does not happen often enough. Perhaps that is because there are too many impatient drivers giving them a hard time so that it generates resentment, who knows? Whatever the case, even though as a pedestrian I have the “right-of-way” at a pedestrian crossing I do not walk blindly out in front cars until I have clear indication they are going to stop. I look after my own well being and safely cross the road, as I would on a bicycle.

I get your point, as I am entering a green lane I swing my right arm out to indicate that I am not turning left (ironically I have been abused by a car driver for doing this) but I dont have to, its part of my roadcraft. It has stopped people like Mr Jims Mowing from cutting across me.

But, what you are expecting of that rider is outside what they are required to do by law. If he is riding down a straight bit of road but does not have to indicate that he is going straight ahead, nor does any other driver. What did all the other traffic at the time do as they went past the intersection? Fair chance they didnt indicate because then the would have given all the other road users around them a false indication of their intentions.

The only real difference is that you as a driver were not abele to just cruise left into the lane at your road pace, you had to slow down to the riders pace, you did the right thing.

aceofspades 10:18 am 28 Jun 12

Grrrr said :

aceofspades said :

I don’t think the concern is the money or insurance. Bicycles have no indicators, brake-lights, mirrors and are not required to go through the same roadworthy stringency that other vehicles do. Combine that with the fact that it is extremely rare to see a cyclist indicate their intentions or even look (head check) and be aware of other vehicles.

I was travelling north on Monaro Hwy trying to turn left onto Mugga Lane. A cyclist was travelling on the shoulder and evidently wanted to travel straight ahead, however I had no way of knowing this at the time. I had no choice other than to slow down behind the cyclist and wait to find out his intentions. Luckily for him as he almost expected the right of way as he left the shoulder and rode across the left turn only lane without even checking or indicating his intentions. The situation was very similar to this video except he was on the shoulder and not a designated bicycle lane. I remember wondering what would have happened if I wasn’t so cautious and who would have been at fault if an accident had occurred.

I also do not remember being advised as a driver about these green cycle lanes. Did I miss an advertising campaign that lets me know how to approach or behave around these lanes? Really, I think the only reason car drivers give way is because they don’t want to kill somebody and any cyclist that takes this for granted is putting thier life at risk.

So, by your own admission you don’t know the road rules.

You suggest that cars don’t have to give way at green lanes and only do so because they don’t want to kill anyone. Again, you should already know the road rules about the cycle lanes: The green lanes are not indicating a changed / new road regulation. They are to REMIND you that the cyclist travelling in that lane has right of way just like they always have. There was a publicity campaign around them at the time of their introduction, too.

Lastly, I’m guessing you also don’t know that cyclists not are legally being required to indicate left, and your perception of cyclists’ lack of indication is partly based on that.

Straight away a cyclist wanting to rant and rave. Firstly I have nothing against cyclists on the road and have never even come close to hitting one. I am never impatient on the road and drive as if I have all day to get where I want to go. I give way to cyclists on bicycle lanes but do wonder about them leaving the shoulder without even looking for traffic.

All I have done here is pointed out some things that make situations more dangerous then they need to be. I am not interested in what is legal and what is not, all I am interested in is what is safe and what is not. It is safe for cyclists to at least try and indicate their intentions, which in my opinion does not happen often enough. Perhaps that is because there are too many impatient drivers giving them a hard time so that it generates resentment, who knows? Whatever the case, even though as a pedestrian I have the “right-of-way” at a pedestrian crossing I do not walk blindly out in front cars until I have clear indication they are going to stop. I look after my own well being and safely cross the road, as I would on a bicycle.

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