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Light rail: Shortlist announced to deliver first stage of Capital Metro

By Canfan 18 March 2015 171

Two world-leading consortia have been shortlisted to deliver the first-stage of Canberra’s light rail network, which will deliver more than 3,500 jobs during construction and deliver more than $1 billion in benefits to the ACT economy, Minister for Capital Metro Simon Corbell announced today.

The two consortia, ACTivate and Canberra Metro, contain some of the world’s biggest and most respected companies when it comes to delivering major infrastructure projects and operating successful public transport networks. 

The successful consortia will now progress through to the request for proposals stage before a successful bidder is selected in early 2016 with construction to commence later that year. 

“Following a strong industry response from local, national and international companies and detailed evaluation of the four expressions of interest, I am pleased to announce ACTivate and Canberra Metro have been shortlisted,” Mr Corbell said.

“The makeup of each consortium is reflective of the high level of interest and strong market appetite for the project. The strength of the four consortia to express interest in Capital Metro stage one is reflected by the obvious high quality of the two consortia that have been selected for the RFP stage.

“To have two consortia with such a high level of experience in international and national transport projects competing to deliver this transformative infrastructure project is a fantastic result for the ACT.

“The expression of interest stage required consortia to demonstrate their capability in meeting five core criteria. They were evaluated on their experience in successfully delivering comparable projects, ability to manage safety issues, demonstrated understanding of commercial and risk management matters, financial capacity as well as meeting and understanding the aspirations of the project.”

Some of the major projects and public transport systems built, managed and operated by the companies involved in the two shortlisted consortia include:

  • Gold Coast light rail
  • Coast to Coast light rail, Adelaide
  • Yarra Trams, Melbourne
  • Dijon light rail, France
  • Bordeaux light rail, France
  • Inner West Light Rail Extension, Sydney
  • Waterloo Stage 1, Canada
  • Eskisehir, Turkey
  • North West Rail Link
  • Sydney Light Rail Inner West Extension
  • Stockholm Light Rail
  • Tram Heilbronn
  • Glenfield to Leppington Rail Link
  • TrackStar Alliance
  • Regional Rail Packages
  • Metro Tram Melbourne
  • London Overground Rail Operations Ltd (LOROL)

Capital Metro is the second major infrastructure project in the ACT to be delivered by a public private partnership.  It will deliver a modern, world-class public transport system that will help prevent a projected  57-minute average commute by car between City and Gungahlin in 2031.

 “By delivering this project through a public private partnership model, we can capitalise on the skills and knowledge of the private sector to deliver a world class light rail system befitting one of the world’s most liveable cities,” Mr Corbell said.

“Capital Metro stage one will support over 3,500 jobs during construction. These jobs will create new opportunities for local businesses and significant economic benefit for the whole of Canberra.”

Capital Metro has a local industry policy to encourage Canberra region companies to become involved in the project and the ACT Government will arrange information sessions between local businesses and both consortia in coming months.

The RFP will be issued to the shortlisted respondents in April 2015. The selection of a successful bidder to design, construct, operate, maintain and finance the light rail service from the City to Gungahlin will occur in 2016, with construction to commence later that year.

(Simon Corbell media release)

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Light rail: Shortlist announced to deliver first stage of Capital Metro
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rubaiyat 7:03 pm 09 Apr 15

btw I found the 90km/hr limit on the L.A. light rail is a limitation of their signalling system not the trams themselves.

rubaiyat 5:47 pm 09 Apr 15

rubaiyat said :

None of which worries tram passengers.

Nor does having a drink with their meal, when they enjoy that pleasant night out along restaurant lined streets, free of car fumes and noise.

rubaiyat 5:44 pm 09 Apr 15

dungfungus said :

I have probably ridden on more trams than you have – I have even ridden the entire Sydney network daily on school holidays 60 years ago before the tyre and diesel salesmen convinced politicians to cover the tracks and pull down the wires and replace everything with buses.
I am one of the 92% of Canberrans that rarely travel by bus.
The standard ticketing for trams for casual travellers that I am familiar with is to buy a ticket at the platform or immediately after boarding (from an electronic dispenser). I have seen a lot of people get on trams in Europe and not buy a ticket and I have seen a lot get caught by the inspectors for not having a ticket or having a concessional ticket that is not applicable. The fines are savage. It will be a problem in Canberra just like everywhere else.
http://www.progressiverailroading.com/passenger_rail/news/Fare-evasions-cost-Metro-Transit-up-to-28000-a-week–44082
PS Elephants have excellent memories.

Well that probably explains why you don’t like trams, even with the double doors you’d have trouble getting through the doors. 😉

The Sydney network was the largest in the world when they trashed it. It also consisted of very old toast rack trams and the connie swung around the outside collecting the fares.

At the same time cars still had cranks to start them up when they broke down.

But EVEN CARS have moved along in the intervening half decade +, and drivers face savage fines when they speed, park illegally, don’t buckle up, text or talk on their mobile phones, and run over pedestrians, bicycle riders and into each other.

None of which worries tram passengers.

dungfungus 3:48 pm 09 Apr 15

rubaiyat said :

switch said :

Look, if it make you feel better, they can be electric buses.

Electric buses are the worst of all worlds and would need most of the infrastructure and right of way of trams without the benefits.

Nothing beats the efficiency and smooth ride of steel wheels on steel rails.

Back in 2003 a train driver in Victoria took a toilet break at Broadmeadows station and failed to apply the brake correctly. The Train rolled 17 km to Spencer Street station where it hit a stationary train at 75km/hr. Ignoring the accident it clearly demonstrated just how low the friction is.

Regarding “friction”, are you referring to the rails or the toilet seat?.
And the smooth ride that some trams have quickly disappears when they are travelling above 60KMH.

dungfungus 3:43 pm 09 Apr 15

rubaiyat said :

dungfungus said :

“The ACT would still need 3 x times the drivers. 1 Tram = 3 buses.”
But the trams will need at least one (two to be effective) ticket inspectors on each tram to detect fare evaders.
You are aware that while trams boast quick access and egress through their multiple doors they cannot control people without tickets boarding as a bus can through channelling all boarding passengers through one door under the control of the driver.
Cities already with trams estimate that 20% of passengers are fare evaders. That will hurt the Canberra
tram operator’s bottom line.

I keep having to ask you this, it is the elephant in the room that just won’t go away:

Have you EVER ridden in a tram? Or ANY public transport?

They use the same electronic ticketing systems as everything else these days.

I have probably ridden on more trams than you have – I have even ridden the entire Sydney network daily on school holidays 60 years ago before the tyre and diesel salesmen convinced politicians to cover the tracks and pull down the wires and replace everything with buses.
I am one of the 92% of Canberrans that rarely travel by bus.
The standard ticketing for trams for casual travellers that I am familiar with is to buy a ticket at the platform or immediately after boarding (from an electronic dispenser). I have seen a lot of people get on trams in Europe and not buy a ticket and I have seen a lot get caught by the inspectors for not having a ticket or having a concessional ticket that is not applicable. The fines are savage. It will be a problem in Canberra just like everywhere else.
http://www.progressiverailroading.com/passenger_rail/news/Fare-evasions-cost-Metro-Transit-up-to-28000-a-week–44082
PS Elephants have excellent memories.

rubaiyat 2:53 pm 09 Apr 15

dungfungus said :

“The ACT would still need 3 x times the drivers. 1 Tram = 3 buses.”
But the trams will need at least one (two to be effective) ticket inspectors on each tram to detect fare evaders.
You are aware that while trams boast quick access and egress through their multiple doors they cannot control people without tickets boarding as a bus can through channelling all boarding passengers through one door under the control of the driver.
Cities already with trams estimate that 20% of passengers are fare evaders. That will hurt the Canberra
tram operator’s bottom line.

I keep having to ask you this, it is the elephant in the room that just won’t go away:

Have you EVER ridden in a tram? Or ANY public transport?

They use the same electronic ticketing systems as everything else these days.

rubaiyat 2:07 pm 09 Apr 15

dungfungus said :

You appear to be very well informed on the motives and largesse of governments.
Perhaps your sources can reveal how much money the Stanhope government lost on the ill-fated Rhodium Asset Solutions venture. A lot of the paperwork went missing on that one too.

Just did a quick search and it seems as big a stuff up as Rhodium was, it still paled into insignificance against Bruce Stadium and The Canberra Hospital implosion that killed poor Katie Bender.

btw I liked this quote by Jon Stanhope: “The Greens and Liberals were today exposed for abusing the Assembly committee processes in making an unfounded and indefensible attack on the Government.”

Those evil Greens! Always making trouble!!

I would have made more of an issue over the double mishandling of the massive bush fires in Canberra and the money that went into sweeping it all under the carpet. Bushfires that swept right through where they are currently building Molonglo. WITHOUT an integrated transport plan, nor fire emergency plan.

rubaiyat 1:55 pm 09 Apr 15

switch said :

Look, if it make you feel better, they can be electric buses.

Electric buses are the worst of all worlds and would need most of the infrastructure and right of way of trams without the benefits.

Nothing beats the efficiency and smooth ride of steel wheels on steel rails.

Back in 2003 a train driver in Victoria took a toilet break at Broadmeadows station and failed to apply the brake correctly. The Train rolled 17 km to Spencer Street station where it hit a stationary train at 75km/hr. Ignoring the accident it clearly demonstrated just how low the friction is.

rubaiyat 1:22 pm 09 Apr 15

dungfungus said :

You appear to be very well informed on the motives and largesse of governments.
Perhaps your sources can reveal how much money the Stanhope government lost on the ill-fated Rhodium Asset Solutions venture. A lot of the paperwork went missing on that one too.

I leave that up to you. Don’t make the mistake that I am for the Labor government.

I just want competent government that executes sensible policy.

switch 7:52 am 09 Apr 15

rubaiyat said :

switch said :

It does seem very strange that light rail planning continues, when they could make a lot more money by doing the medium density infill, forgetting about the silly tram and achieve the same result from just declaring a dedicated bus lane during peak hour.

Hardly the “same result”.

That would remove one lane from all the other vehicles, being either 50% or 33% less lanes in peak hour.

The ACT would still be 100% reliant on oil for transport.

The ACT would still need 3 x times the drivers. 1 Tram = 3 buses.

There would still be no overall transport planning for the future when Canberra grows in population and congestion, including the extra population in the medium density infill that still would have to rely on the existing transport infrastructure.

But I take your point that it would put things off, an excellent solution. The extra population and congestion will all go away if you ignore them.

Look, if it make you feel better, they can be electric buses.

dungfungus 7:23 am 09 Apr 15

rubaiyat said :

switch said :

It does seem very strange that light rail planning continues, when they could make a lot more money by doing the medium density infill, forgetting about the silly tram and achieve the same result from just declaring a dedicated bus lane during peak hour.

Hardly the “same result”.

That would remove one lane from all the other vehicles, being either 50% or 33% less lanes in peak hour.

The ACT would still be 100% reliant on oil for transport.

The ACT would still need 3 x times the drivers. 1 Tram = 3 buses.

There would still be no overall transport planning for the future when Canberra grows in population and congestion, including the extra population in the medium density infill that still would have to rely on the existing transport infrastructure.

But I take your point that it would put things off, an excellent solution. The extra population and congestion will all go away if you ignore them.

“The ACT would still need 3 x times the drivers. 1 Tram = 3 buses.”
But the trams will need at least one (two to be effective) ticket inspectors on each tram to detect fare evaders.
You are aware that while trams boast quick access and egress through their multiple doors they cannot control people without tickets boarding as a bus can through channelling all boarding passengers through one door under the control of the driver.
Cities already with trams estimate that 20% of passengers are fare evaders. That will hurt the Canberra
tram operator’s bottom line.

9

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