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Lights go out at Barton Highway intersection

By johnboy - 29 September 2011 7


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This morning we posted Ralpho’s disgust with the new traffic lights on the Barton Highway at the Kuringa Drive intersection.

This afternoon Territory And Municipal Services have announced they’ve turned the lights off:

“Works have been underway for several months at the intersection of Barton Highway and Kuringa Drive to provide road access into the new suburb of Casey,” Mr Gill said. “The road works will also provide another access point to Gungahlin.

“During this construction work there has been a number of traffic crashes, and in an effort to improve safety of the intersection temporary traffic lights were installed yesterday.

“Unfortunately, after observing the temporary traffic arrangements on site yesterday evening and this morning, Roads ACT has decided that there is currently not sufficient lane capacity available for the traffic lights to be in operation without causing major delays.

“Roads ACT will ensure the traffic lights are switched off and that the previous temporary traffic arrangements be reinstated prior to today’s afternoon peak traffic period. This will mean that traffic on the Barton Highway will have priority with traffic turning into and out of Kuringa Drive controlled by a stop sign.

“Once lane capacity at this intersection is increased Roads ACT will investigate whether or not the temporary traffic lights can be turned back on.

Who said whinging never changes anything?

barton highway

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7 Responses to
Lights go out at Barton Highway intersection
niceplacetolive 2:50 pm 25 Oct 11

Anyone caught in the traffic on the Barton Highway at Kooringa drive is recommended to call John Husband at TAMS on 6205 2920. TAMS think that the traffic management that has been put in place is working and that the traffic is flowing smoothly. They also think that there are two lanes of traffic flowing on the Barton Highway.

Spectra 7:57 am 30 Sep 11

Spectra said :

So the question must be asked, then: How much money did we spend installing those temporary lights that simple traffic analysis would have shown were doomed to failure? Or are they at least the same lights that will be there long term? (And if so, why refer to them as “temporary”?).

On closer inspection this morning, the lights they were using are clearly the permanent ones. So at least there’s that.

JC 6:50 am 30 Sep 11

Spectra said :

So the question must be asked, then: How much money did we spend installing those temporary lights that simple traffic analysis would have shown were doomed to failure? Or are they at least the same lights that will be there long term? (And if so, why refer to them as “temporary”?).

I didn’t see them myself but I imagine they would have been the portable type, so the cost wouldn’t have been all that much.

yellowsnow 10:55 pm 29 Sep 11

Spectra said :

So the question must be asked, then: How much money did we spend installing those temporary lights that simple traffic analysis would have shown were doomed to failure? Or are they at least the same lights that will be there long term? (And if so, why refer to them as “temporary”?).

Probably had something to do with the fact that any road traffic projections Roads ACT do end up underestimating reality by 50%. GDE mark I anyone? The basic rule of thumb should be whatever their consultants (usually SMEC) say traffic will be — double or triple it to get a more accurate idea of actual conditions.

Whenever you hear the words ‘Don’t worry, we’ve got modelling that shows the road will cope with traffic due to development X’ — don’t believe it!! Unless by ‘coping’ they mean traffic will be able to inch along at two to ten metres a minute.

EvanJames 10:27 pm 29 Sep 11

And yet the block-up every morning on Pialligo Ave continues. Same constituency is affected: people who live in NSW and work in the ACT. I wonder how they did it?

Spectra 10:17 pm 29 Sep 11

So the question must be asked, then: How much money did we spend installing those temporary lights that simple traffic analysis would have shown were doomed to failure? Or are they at least the same lights that will be there long term? (And if so, why refer to them as “temporary”?).

JC 9:43 pm 29 Sep 11

Not a surprise. As for accidents if they want to know why there are accidents how about looking at the stupid solid barriers they are using which means it is very hard to see what is coming, and when you can see it is hard to tell what lane they are in. With the latter especially when turning off Kuringa Drive right onto the highway.

Coupled with the fact that the Kuringa drive taffic needs to give way to the highway traffic, despite the road layout (albeit temporary of course) giving the Kuringa traffic the ‘through’ lane. The bizzar thing is on the Canberra side of the intersection it wouldn’t be hard to give the highway and Kuringa drive traffic seperate lanes. Guess if they did then drivers would then drive too fast.

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