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Like a strange Santa Claus, an extra bin arrives!

johnboy 3 January 2014 46

wheely bins

I have lived in share houses with six people and gotten by with just the normal two wheely bins.

My nuclear family of 4 managed fine with the usual compliment of bins.

Living with Goosepig, however, I found we were in a constant battle with overflowing bins necessitating time consuming trips to the tip.

My initial reaction was, as the environmentalists would like, to question our patterns of consumption and look to trim our lifestyles to something that was, if not sustainable, able to fit in the normal two bins considering it was just for two people.

Goosepig is made of more direct stuff and she was off to the TAMS website to order a second recycling wheely bin.

This morning when I trudged out to bring the bins in it was like a Christmas Miracle.

There was a shiny new recycling bin next to the old one. It had New Bin Smell!

For a $28.50 a year we don’t need to adjust our lifestyles at all!

By way of comparison Goosepig’s old apartment block had four recycling bins servicing eight apartments twelve apartments, some of them with families.

Just the two of us now have 50% of that capacity!

I honestly don’t know whether to laugh or cry.


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46 Responses to
Like a strange Santa Claus, an extra bin arrives!
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IrishPete 7:08 am 05 Jan 14

moneypenny2612 said :

IrishPete said :

A container deposit scheme would greatly reduce the amount of recycling in bins. But with Keep Australia Beautiful in hock to Coke, and Clean Up Australia in hock to McDonalds, a CDS is still some time away unless you live in SA. (Does anyone now why Coke took on the NT Government but not SA?)

It is my understanding that the Coke legal challenge to the NT scheme ran a different argument, but for the record Alan Bond via Castlemaine Tooheys challenged the SA CDS in the 1980s.

He scored a phyrric victory because I understand that later changes to the SA law made it constitutionally valid – a uniform deposit should be OK, but differential deposits may be invalid if – in short – they are disproportionate for the wrong reasons).

yeah, but why aren’t Coke challenging the SA scheme now? Or would the bad PR not be worth it?

IP

moneypenny2612 8:25 pm 04 Jan 14

IrishPete said :

A container deposit scheme would greatly reduce the amount of recycling in bins. But with Keep Australia Beautiful in hock to Coke, and Clean Up Australia in hock to McDonalds, a CDS is still some time away unless you live in SA. (Does anyone now why Coke took on the NT Government but not SA?)

It is my understanding that the Coke legal challenge to the NT scheme ran a different argument, but for the record Alan Bond via Castlemaine Tooheys challenged the SA CDS in the 1980s.

He scored a phyrric victory because I understand that later changes to the SA law made it constitutionally valid – a uniform deposit should be OK, but differential deposits may be invalid if – in short – they are disproportionate for the wrong reasons).

IrishPete 7:45 pm 04 Jan 14

Queen_of_the_Bun said :

Milk cartons.
Tins – tomatoes, tuna, salmon, chick peas, beans.
Newspapers.
Plastic bottles from cleaning products.
If you check carefully there is an amazing range of waste that can be recycled – even coffee pods.

Forgot to mention olives, artichokes, grilled eggplant, grilled zucchini, Indian chutneys, curry pastes and assorted “gourmet” stuff in jars that I love.

My milk comes in cardboard cartons (organic milk from Aldi), and they get burnt.

Can’t buy newspaper for 40km, so all reading is done on the web apart from the free local rags.

Plastic bottles from cleaning products (and roll-on antiperspirant, shower gels etc) are only an occasional deposit. Aerosols too.

Some plastic packaging, and also the aluminium tray from inside some supermarket bakery products.

Quite a lot of junk mail from charities goes in the recycling bin, along with regular junk mail (though not much of that where I live).

IP

IrishPete 7:39 pm 04 Jan 14

scentednightgardens said :

Consider the plight of rural residents, to the north. No municipal kerbside garbage collection (in Sutton, for example) means private operators must fill the gap. No kerbside recycling full-stop. Recycling means a nice little drive with the car/trailer to one of a few dusty fly blown stations. You spend some tip-side quality time sorting your refuse into one of 6 hoppers, by PET type and glass colour and NO cardboard please. And don’t put a clear bottle into the blue-tint glass hopper because somewhere, a fairy dies.

Oh, for a bin with a yellow lid to darken the driveway….

If you’re in Palerang Council area let me know, and I’ll see what we can do. Macs Reef Road transfer station should be up and running this year, and should be a lot more pleasant than the tip. Apparently some waste transfer stations have cafes!

O’Sullivan’s Rural Waste get a free ride by being allowed to deposit rubbish at Palerang’s tips for free. If they had to pay, you’d be paying more for their service. When the WTSs open, I dont know that O’Sullivan’s will do.

IP

poetix 7:27 pm 04 Jan 14

Queen_of_the_Bun said :

Forgot to mention olives, artichokes, grilled eggplant, grilled zucchini, Indian chutneys, curry pastes and assorted “gourmet” stuff in jars that I love.

My fridge wants to go out with your bin, Queen of the Bin.

Queen_of_the_Bun 4:21 pm 04 Jan 14

Queen_of_the_Bun said :

IrishPete said :

gungsuperstar said :

Ahhhh, the drink soft drink/beer like it’s water generation… surely the only reason 2 people could use 2 recycling bins.

Admittedly, I live by myself… If I have to put my recycling bin out more than once every 10 weeks I consider it extra exertion.

I drink water, I eat as much fresh meat, fruit and vegetables as I can – the waste from which generally isn’t recyclable.

What the hell is everyone else eating and drinking that they need so much recycling capacity?

Seriously, help me out… I’m at a complete loss here.

Beer bottles

Dog food tins

The cardboard boxes the above come in.

Plastic juice containers (2L or 3L) and some large lemonade bottles (the 5% lemon juice kind)

I use quite a lot of jars but mostly give them to a woman who makes and sells jam and stuff.

Cardboard boxes, mainly from Aldi, used to bring shopping home (as well as being recyclable, they also insulate cold stuff better than plastic bags).

I do what I can to crush them, but the beer bottles and the dog food tins don’t crush much.

IP

Milk cartons.
Tins – tomatoes, tuna, salmon, chick peas, beans.
Newspapers.
Plastic bottles from cleaning products.
If you check carefully there is an amazing range of waste that can be recycled – even coffee pods.

Forgot to mention olives, artichokes, grilled eggplant, grilled zucchini, Indian chutneys, curry pastes and assorted “gourmet” stuff in jars that I love.

scentednightgardens 2:37 pm 04 Jan 14

Consider the plight of rural residents, to the north. No municipal kerbside garbage collection (in Sutton, for example) means private operators must fill the gap. No kerbside recycling full-stop. Recycling means a nice little drive with the car/trailer to one of a few dusty fly blown stations. You spend some tip-side quality time sorting your refuse into one of 6 hoppers, by PET type and glass colour and NO cardboard please. And don’t put a clear bottle into the blue-tint glass hopper because somewhere, a fairy dies.

Oh, for a bin with a yellow lid to darken the driveway….

Queen_of_the_Bun 2:00 pm 04 Jan 14

IrishPete said :

gungsuperstar said :

Ahhhh, the drink soft drink/beer like it’s water generation… surely the only reason 2 people could use 2 recycling bins.

Admittedly, I live by myself… If I have to put my recycling bin out more than once every 10 weeks I consider it extra exertion.

I drink water, I eat as much fresh meat, fruit and vegetables as I can – the waste from which generally isn’t recyclable.

What the hell is everyone else eating and drinking that they need so much recycling capacity?

Seriously, help me out… I’m at a complete loss here.

Beer bottles

Dog food tins

The cardboard boxes the above come in.

Plastic juice containers (2L or 3L) and some large lemonade bottles (the 5% lemon juice kind)

I use quite a lot of jars but mostly give them to a woman who makes and sells jam and stuff.

Cardboard boxes, mainly from Aldi, used to bring shopping home (as well as being recyclable, they also insulate cold stuff better than plastic bags).

I do what I can to crush them, but the beer bottles and the dog food tins don’t crush much.

IP

Milk cartons.
Tins – tomatoes, tuna, salmon, chick peas, beans.
Newspapers.
Plastic bottles from cleaning products.
If you check carefully there is an amazing range of waste that can be recycled – even coffee pods.

IrishPete 1:19 pm 04 Jan 14

Deref said :

goosepig said :

NoAddedMSG said :

Deref said :

What are you doing to generate so much? Three six-packs per day? 😉

And ordering everything online to generate an excess of cardboard boxes?

Buying much less online now due to that very reason!

We’re a three-person household and we hardly ever get close to filling up our recycling bin – and we’re religious recyclers. And I order a lot of stuff online.

I’m genuinely puzzled as to how two people could generate so much.

Religious recyclers. Now there’s a thought. I thought all religions were recycled. Though they probably all belong in the other bin.

But seriously, with a fortnightly collection and a single-person household with about 60kg of dogs, it is quite common for me to fill my recycling bin and start on the neighbour’s. But I’m not going to risk injury by trying to flatten dog food tins (aluminum tins are a different matters, but I almost never have any – beer from a tin tastes of tin; beer from a bottle tastes of beer; soft drink is much cheaper and healthier in resealable plastic bottles), and plastic bottles are not a large component of my recycling nor do they crush particularly well (probably only to about two-thirds the volume, no less).

A container deposit scheme would greatly reduce the amount of recycling in bins. But with Keep Australia Beautiful in hock to Coke, and Clean Up Australia in hock to McDonalds, a CDS is still some time away unless you live in SA. (Does anyone now why Coke took on the NT Government but not SA?)

IP

s-s-a 1:08 pm 04 Jan 14

Just come back from the coast and read in the local paper that Kiama Council (or maybe it was Wollongong) have weekly recycling collection from Xmas to the end of Jan to cater for extras such as packaging and bottles. Are you listening TAMS???

goggles13 1:05 pm 04 Jan 14

poetix said :

goggles13 said :

when is the ACT Govt going to join the 21st century and offer green bins?

My dear goggles,

Those bins are green. With yellow lids.

Sincerely,

poetix

I meant green waste bins

HiddenDragon 12:00 pm 04 Jan 14

gungsuperstar said :

Ahhhh, the drink soft drink/beer like it’s water generation… surely the only reason 2 people could use 2 recycling bins.

Admittedly, I live by myself… If I have to put my recycling bin out more than once every 10 weeks I consider it extra exertion.

I drink water, I eat as much fresh meat, fruit and vegetables as I can – the waste from which generally isn’t recyclable.

What the hell is everyone else eating and drinking that they need so much recycling capacity?

Seriously, help me out… I’m at a complete loss here.

In my street, the emptying of the recycling bins often sounds like a hailstorm from hell – all that glass – and I doubt whether I am surrounded by jam and pickle addicts…….

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DWAYXdeArF0

Deref 11:48 am 04 Jan 14

goosepig said :

NoAddedMSG said :

Deref said :

What are you doing to generate so much? Three six-packs per day? 😉

And ordering everything online to generate an excess of cardboard boxes?

Buying much less online now due to that very reason!

We’re a three-person household and we hardly ever get close to filling up our recycling bin – and we’re religious recyclers. And I order a lot of stuff online.

I’m genuinely puzzled as to how two people could generate so much.

Mickeyp 11:40 am 04 Jan 14

Well I think encouraging recycling is a good thing. Keeping it cheap is a good idea :)…

Genie 11:12 am 04 Jan 14

Make sure you flatten everything before you put it in the recycling bins.. We used to forget to put our bins out all the time, so our recycling bin was only being collected monthly at one stage. Thus resulting in a box of recycling being kept in the house as I refused to put it in the normal waste bin.

My room mate is too lazy and I often have to put half of his “recycling” in the rubbish bin, but now I make sure everything is flattened before it goes in the bin. Recyclable milk and soft drink bottles can be squished by pouring it a little hot water to pull the air out. I fold down all boxes and cartons. Crush any cans too.

I can now fit twice as much in my bin, without having to worry if it gets forgotten to be put out each fortnight.

IrishPete 11:11 am 04 Jan 14

gungsuperstar said :

Ahhhh, the drink soft drink/beer like it’s water generation… surely the only reason 2 people could use 2 recycling bins.

Admittedly, I live by myself… If I have to put my recycling bin out more than once every 10 weeks I consider it extra exertion.

I drink water, I eat as much fresh meat, fruit and vegetables as I can – the waste from which generally isn’t recyclable.

What the hell is everyone else eating and drinking that they need so much recycling capacity?

Seriously, help me out… I’m at a complete loss here.

Beer bottles

Dog food tins

The cardboard boxes the above come in.

Plastic juice containers (2L or 3L) and some large lemonade bottles (the 5% lemon juice kind)

I use quite a lot of jars but mostly give them to a woman who makes and sells jam and stuff.

Cardboard boxes, mainly from Aldi, used to bring shopping home (as well as being recyclable, they also insulate cold stuff better than plastic bags).

I do what I can to crush them, but the beer bottles and the dog food tins don’t crush much.

IP

Comic_and_Gamer_Nerd 8:33 am 04 Jan 14

Online purchases fill the recycling bin real fast.

Annoying, but not much can be do e about it. I am living in the present, government is living in the past.

no idea 7:25 am 04 Jan 14

When I worked for a large supermarket chain (many years ago),the store manager would instruct me to collect the full bag recycling containers and dump the contents in the mall rubbish compactor, they were never collected for recycling!

gungsuperstar 1:40 am 04 Jan 14

Ahhhh, the drink soft drink/beer like it’s water generation… surely the only reason 2 people could use 2 recycling bins.

Admittedly, I live by myself… If I have to put my recycling bin out more than once every 10 weeks I consider it extra exertion.

I drink water, I eat as much fresh meat, fruit and vegetables as I can – the waste from which generally isn’t recyclable.

What the hell is everyone else eating and drinking that they need so much recycling capacity?

Seriously, help me out… I’m at a complete loss here.

m_ratt 10:16 pm 03 Jan 14

Richard Bender said :

bd84 said :

I fail to see why it costs anything to get an extra recycling bin, yet alone require the fee to be paid annually. It wouldn’t cost them any more to collect additional bins, just take another 20 seconds of their route.

And the material in the bin then magically disappears?

Nil extra collection cost – currently the excess recycling would be (by most people) disposed of in rubbish instead – more recycling loads, fewer rubbish loads.

Sure, greater processing required for the greater amount of recycling, but that processing cost would also exist if everybody did the right thing and transported their excess to the drop off centres.

On the flip side, there’s less going to landfill, which according we will continue to run out of – remember the ‘stink’ about the recent Mugga Lane tip expansion?

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