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Looking for a dentist that will look at all alternatives to removing wisdom teeth

By matthewb974 - 1 November 2014 15

My wisdom teeth are starting to really play up now (I’m 25) and I would really prefer not to have them removed. My wisdom teeth are only slightly angled, so I believe that if some of the gum was removed from above they may be able to come through completely.

What I’m looking for is a dentist who will look at all options before jumping right into removing the wisdom teeth. A caveat is that I’m with BUPA so they’ll need to be a BUPA covered dentist.

What’s Your opinion?


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15 Responses to
Looking for a dentist that will look at all alternatives to removing wisdom teeth
Maya123 4:00 pm 04 Nov 14

dungfungus said :

thatsnotme said :

bronal said :

Yes, and if it were me I’d have them taken out by an oral surgeon in a day hospital every time. A GA shouldn’t be a worry unless you have a health problem, In the chair? No thanks!

It’s different for everyone, and for all sorts of different wisdom teeth. I only had mine come through on the top, and without a matching set of teeth on the bottom, they were never going to be of any use except teeth that could cause decay to others around them.

As long as your wisdom teeth are sitting normally (your dentist should do x-rays first to see what they’re dealing with) then having them out in the chair with a local should be no different to having any other large molar removed. About the worst part of my extractions was having to bite down on gauze for an hour afterwards to form a blood clot in the cavity.

It was all over quickly, there was very little pain, and within a few days of the procedure the only way I had any idea it’d been done at all was the cavity where the tooth used to be – a week or two later that had gone too.

Yes, some people have wisdom teeth that aren’t sitting properly, and cause more issues for removal – that’s a different matter, and surgical removal may make more sense then. Going under a GA just to have normal teeth removed though?? Seems to me that sometimes people hear ‘wisdom teeth’ and think they’re completely different to every other tooth in your mouth.

The reason GA is used is that under local, the sight of insertion of a stainless steel chisel followed by very audible blows from a hammer is not everyone’s cup of tea (or in Maya’s case, coffee).

That’s part of the skill of the dentist. I never saw the scalpel that was used, and I don’t remember seeing all the other tools either. They were obviously brought to my mouth from an angle I couldn’t observe well. I was too busy with my fear ‘attempting’ to rip the arms off the chair. I remember strong pressure in my mouth, but not the blows. However it was many years ago now. I was scared, but the chair arms were attached well and although not pleasant, the procedure (for not too complicated wisdom teeth removal) was not so bad that I could recommend a general anaesthetic. I’ve been there and I would say, have the local anaesthetic.

dungfungus 11:24 am 04 Nov 14

thatsnotme said :

bronal said :

Yes, and if it were me I’d have them taken out by an oral surgeon in a day hospital every time. A GA shouldn’t be a worry unless you have a health problem, In the chair? No thanks!

It’s different for everyone, and for all sorts of different wisdom teeth. I only had mine come through on the top, and without a matching set of teeth on the bottom, they were never going to be of any use except teeth that could cause decay to others around them.

As long as your wisdom teeth are sitting normally (your dentist should do x-rays first to see what they’re dealing with) then having them out in the chair with a local should be no different to having any other large molar removed. About the worst part of my extractions was having to bite down on gauze for an hour afterwards to form a blood clot in the cavity.

It was all over quickly, there was very little pain, and within a few days of the procedure the only way I had any idea it’d been done at all was the cavity where the tooth used to be – a week or two later that had gone too.

Yes, some people have wisdom teeth that aren’t sitting properly, and cause more issues for removal – that’s a different matter, and surgical removal may make more sense then. Going under a GA just to have normal teeth removed though?? Seems to me that sometimes people hear ‘wisdom teeth’ and think they’re completely different to every other tooth in your mouth.

The reason GA is used is that under local, the sight of insertion of a stainless steel chisel followed by very audible blows from a hammer is not everyone’s cup of tea (or in Maya’s case, coffee).

dungfungus 11:21 am 04 Nov 14

Maya123 said :

dungfungus said :

Maya123 said :

thatsnotme said :

bronal said :

Yes, and if it were me I’d have them taken out by an oral surgeon in a day hospital every time. A GA shouldn’t be a worry unless you have a health problem, In the chair? No thanks!

It’s different for everyone, and for all sorts of different wisdom teeth. I only had mine come through on the top, and without a matching set of teeth on the bottom, they were never going to be of any use except teeth that could cause decay to others around them.

As long as your wisdom teeth are sitting normally (your dentist should do x-rays first to see what they’re dealing with) then having them out in the chair with a local should be no different to having any other large molar removed. About the worst part of my extractions was having to bite down on gauze for an hour afterwards to form a blood clot in the cavity.

It was all over quickly, there was very little pain, and within a few days of the procedure the only way I had any idea it’d been done at all was the cavity where the tooth used to be – a week or two later that had gone too.

Yes, some people have wisdom teeth that aren’t sitting properly, and cause more issues for removal – that’s a different matter, and surgical removal may make more sense then. Going under a GA just to have normal teeth removed though?? Seems to me that sometimes people hear ‘wisdom teeth’ and think they’re completely different to every other tooth in your mouth.

Good comments. I chose to have my wisdom teeth removed with local anaesthetic and the biggest problem was my fear. But I would have been a LOT more scared having a general anaesthetic. One of the impacted teeth required a scalpel to cut open the gum to get to it. The only discomfort was some pressure when the teeth were removed. The cut gum had a stitch. After I left the specialist’s office I went for coffee and scones. It was though a bit messy nibbling (very carefully) on a scone with a mouth full of blood. Because I had only had a local, I was well enough to return to work straight away, but as I had a sick certificate for the day I took the advantage of it and went shopping. I did feel a touch guilty though.
Unless the teeth removing will be very complicated, a local anaesthetic is all that is needed. I was offered both options and the decision was a very quick and easy one; a local, and no-one attempted to change my mind.
After my wisdom teeth were removed I had no pain until the local anaesthetic began to wear off. The pain was then fairly strong, but I downed a couple of tablets the specialist had given me and the pain went away again. I didn’t need to take any more pain killers after that, although I could feel ache from the stitch, but it wasn’t too bad.
If possible take the local anaesthetic option. Less complicated, likely much cheaper and you can return to normal life virtually immediately.

Nothing like a hot coffee to get a freshly stitched wound bleeding. I am surprised you weren’t instructed to avoid hot drinks/food for 24 hours.

I don’t remember being told that. However I never drink very hot coffee and I didn’t have any problem and drinking coffee did not increase the blood flow.

Well, if eating a scone with a mouthful of blood is normal for you, perhaps you need your vampire fangs attended to as well, ha ha.

Maya123 10:18 am 04 Nov 14

dungfungus said :

Maya123 said :

thatsnotme said :

bronal said :

Yes, and if it were me I’d have them taken out by an oral surgeon in a day hospital every time. A GA shouldn’t be a worry unless you have a health problem, In the chair? No thanks!

It’s different for everyone, and for all sorts of different wisdom teeth. I only had mine come through on the top, and without a matching set of teeth on the bottom, they were never going to be of any use except teeth that could cause decay to others around them.

As long as your wisdom teeth are sitting normally (your dentist should do x-rays first to see what they’re dealing with) then having them out in the chair with a local should be no different to having any other large molar removed. About the worst part of my extractions was having to bite down on gauze for an hour afterwards to form a blood clot in the cavity.

It was all over quickly, there was very little pain, and within a few days of the procedure the only way I had any idea it’d been done at all was the cavity where the tooth used to be – a week or two later that had gone too.

Yes, some people have wisdom teeth that aren’t sitting properly, and cause more issues for removal – that’s a different matter, and surgical removal may make more sense then. Going under a GA just to have normal teeth removed though?? Seems to me that sometimes people hear ‘wisdom teeth’ and think they’re completely different to every other tooth in your mouth.

Good comments. I chose to have my wisdom teeth removed with local anaesthetic and the biggest problem was my fear. But I would have been a LOT more scared having a general anaesthetic. One of the impacted teeth required a scalpel to cut open the gum to get to it. The only discomfort was some pressure when the teeth were removed. The cut gum had a stitch. After I left the specialist’s office I went for coffee and scones. It was though a bit messy nibbling (very carefully) on a scone with a mouth full of blood. Because I had only had a local, I was well enough to return to work straight away, but as I had a sick certificate for the day I took the advantage of it and went shopping. I did feel a touch guilty though.
Unless the teeth removing will be very complicated, a local anaesthetic is all that is needed. I was offered both options and the decision was a very quick and easy one; a local, and no-one attempted to change my mind.
After my wisdom teeth were removed I had no pain until the local anaesthetic began to wear off. The pain was then fairly strong, but I downed a couple of tablets the specialist had given me and the pain went away again. I didn’t need to take any more pain killers after that, although I could feel ache from the stitch, but it wasn’t too bad.
If possible take the local anaesthetic option. Less complicated, likely much cheaper and you can return to normal life virtually immediately.

Nothing like a hot coffee to get a freshly stitched wound bleeding. I am surprised you weren’t instructed to avoid hot drinks/food for 24 hours.

I don’t remember being told that. However I never drink very hot coffee and I didn’t have any problem and drinking coffee did not increase the blood flow.

dungfungus 11:01 pm 03 Nov 14

Maya123 said :

thatsnotme said :

bronal said :

Yes, and if it were me I’d have them taken out by an oral surgeon in a day hospital every time. A GA shouldn’t be a worry unless you have a health problem, In the chair? No thanks!

It’s different for everyone, and for all sorts of different wisdom teeth. I only had mine come through on the top, and without a matching set of teeth on the bottom, they were never going to be of any use except teeth that could cause decay to others around them.

As long as your wisdom teeth are sitting normally (your dentist should do x-rays first to see what they’re dealing with) then having them out in the chair with a local should be no different to having any other large molar removed. About the worst part of my extractions was having to bite down on gauze for an hour afterwards to form a blood clot in the cavity.

It was all over quickly, there was very little pain, and within a few days of the procedure the only way I had any idea it’d been done at all was the cavity where the tooth used to be – a week or two later that had gone too.

Yes, some people have wisdom teeth that aren’t sitting properly, and cause more issues for removal – that’s a different matter, and surgical removal may make more sense then. Going under a GA just to have normal teeth removed though?? Seems to me that sometimes people hear ‘wisdom teeth’ and think they’re completely different to every other tooth in your mouth.

Good comments. I chose to have my wisdom teeth removed with local anaesthetic and the biggest problem was my fear. But I would have been a LOT more scared having a general anaesthetic. One of the impacted teeth required a scalpel to cut open the gum to get to it. The only discomfort was some pressure when the teeth were removed. The cut gum had a stitch. After I left the specialist’s office I went for coffee and scones. It was though a bit messy nibbling (very carefully) on a scone with a mouth full of blood. Because I had only had a local, I was well enough to return to work straight away, but as I had a sick certificate for the day I took the advantage of it and went shopping. I did feel a touch guilty though.
Unless the teeth removing will be very complicated, a local anaesthetic is all that is needed. I was offered both options and the decision was a very quick and easy one; a local, and no-one attempted to change my mind.
After my wisdom teeth were removed I had no pain until the local anaesthetic began to wear off. The pain was then fairly strong, but I downed a couple of tablets the specialist had given me and the pain went away again. I didn’t need to take any more pain killers after that, although I could feel ache from the stitch, but it wasn’t too bad.
If possible take the local anaesthetic option. Less complicated, likely much cheaper and you can return to normal life virtually immediately.

Nothing like a hot coffee to get a freshly stitched wound bleeding. I am surprised you weren’t instructed to avoid hot drinks/food for 24 hours.

Maya123 10:32 pm 03 Nov 14

thatsnotme said :

bronal said :

Yes, and if it were me I’d have them taken out by an oral surgeon in a day hospital every time. A GA shouldn’t be a worry unless you have a health problem, In the chair? No thanks!

It’s different for everyone, and for all sorts of different wisdom teeth. I only had mine come through on the top, and without a matching set of teeth on the bottom, they were never going to be of any use except teeth that could cause decay to others around them.

As long as your wisdom teeth are sitting normally (your dentist should do x-rays first to see what they’re dealing with) then having them out in the chair with a local should be no different to having any other large molar removed. About the worst part of my extractions was having to bite down on gauze for an hour afterwards to form a blood clot in the cavity.

It was all over quickly, there was very little pain, and within a few days of the procedure the only way I had any idea it’d been done at all was the cavity where the tooth used to be – a week or two later that had gone too.

Yes, some people have wisdom teeth that aren’t sitting properly, and cause more issues for removal – that’s a different matter, and surgical removal may make more sense then. Going under a GA just to have normal teeth removed though?? Seems to me that sometimes people hear ‘wisdom teeth’ and think they’re completely different to every other tooth in your mouth.

Good comments. I chose to have my wisdom teeth removed with local anaesthetic and the biggest problem was my fear. But I would have been a LOT more scared having a general anaesthetic. One of the impacted teeth required a scalpel to cut open the gum to get to it. The only discomfort was some pressure when the teeth were removed. The cut gum had a stitch. After I left the specialist’s office I went for coffee and scones. It was though a bit messy nibbling (very carefully) on a scone with a mouth full of blood. Because I had only had a local, I was well enough to return to work straight away, but as I had a sick certificate for the day I took the advantage of it and went shopping. I did feel a touch guilty though.
Unless the teeth removing will be very complicated, a local anaesthetic is all that is needed. I was offered both options and the decision was a very quick and easy one; a local, and no-one attempted to change my mind.
After my wisdom teeth were removed I had no pain until the local anaesthetic began to wear off. The pain was then fairly strong, but I downed a couple of tablets the specialist had given me and the pain went away again. I didn’t need to take any more pain killers after that, although I could feel ache from the stitch, but it wasn’t too bad.
If possible take the local anaesthetic option. Less complicated, likely much cheaper and you can return to normal life virtually immediately.

thatsnotme 9:53 pm 03 Nov 14

bronal said :

Yes, and if it were me I’d have them taken out by an oral surgeon in a day hospital every time. A GA shouldn’t be a worry unless you have a health problem, In the chair? No thanks!

It’s different for everyone, and for all sorts of different wisdom teeth. I only had mine come through on the top, and without a matching set of teeth on the bottom, they were never going to be of any use except teeth that could cause decay to others around them.

As long as your wisdom teeth are sitting normally (your dentist should do x-rays first to see what they’re dealing with) then having them out in the chair with a local should be no different to having any other large molar removed. About the worst part of my extractions was having to bite down on gauze for an hour afterwards to form a blood clot in the cavity.

It was all over quickly, there was very little pain, and within a few days of the procedure the only way I had any idea it’d been done at all was the cavity where the tooth used to be – a week or two later that had gone too.

Yes, some people have wisdom teeth that aren’t sitting properly, and cause more issues for removal – that’s a different matter, and surgical removal may make more sense then. Going under a GA just to have normal teeth removed though?? Seems to me that sometimes people hear ‘wisdom teeth’ and think they’re completely different to every other tooth in your mouth.

bronal 8:10 pm 03 Nov 14

Yes, and if it were me I’d have them taken out by an oral surgeon in a day hospital every time. A GA shouldn’t be a worry unless you have a health problem, In the chair? No thanks!

dungfungus 6:55 pm 03 Nov 14

Get the best surgeon available if you are having impacted wisdom teeth removed.
If there is nerve damage (paresthesia) as a result, the cure can be worse than the original problem.
I am speaking from an unfortunate experience some 40 years ago after being monstered by a sadistic dental surgeon during national service. This bloke did 16 fillings before breakfast one day and tried to pull out my wisdom teeth. He proudly displayed a can of extracted teeth which he said was “yesterday’s haul”.
I had to get the damage sorted out years later.

Maya123 1:34 pm 03 Nov 14

My Grandfather was told many times to get his wisdom teeth out. He ignored the advice and still had trouble free wisdom teeth (along with his other teeth) when he died in his eighties.

I only ever had two wisdom teeth, but I’ve had them out under local anaesthetic. (Having them removed under a general anaesthetic was too scary, and more risky, so I didn’t want this.) Whether I really needed them out I don’t know, but I wasn’t game to risk it. Unfortunately, as it is routine to get the wisdom teeth out, I’m not sure how sound the advice to get them out, is.

Monomyth 1:16 pm 03 Nov 14

fraserfella said :

put bonjela teething gel on them, it really works but unless you have a really big mouth with plenty of room your wisdom teeth will end up rotting and causing problems..

Bonjela did nothing for me. Next to Bonjela you’ll find SM33 gel which has lignocaine in it. It tastes horrible, seriously – but the relief was awesome and nearly immediate.

However, have to agree with the other poster – just get them out.

JimboJones 9:03 pm 02 Nov 14

Try Gungahlin central dentist. I’m with Bupa too and they didn’t charge a gap for consult, clean, X-rays etc. I see Dr Edwards. Nice, honest guy and no nonsense.

dkNigs 7:53 pm 02 Nov 14

As someone who left their angled wisdom teeth a long time and ended up having to get fillings on the next teeth due to the decay when I got them removed, just get them removed, and get them removed early. If you do it in the chair it’s not even that expensive, save yourself $800-$1200 for an anaesthesiologist. Got all four out at once awake.

bronal 6:42 pm 02 Nov 14

Google is your friend here. There are lots of articles on the pros and cons of removing wisdom teeth. Do you have a regular dentist? What does he or she say? Don’t you trust his/her advice? You are always free to get a second (or third opinion), at your own expense of course. The prevailing attitude in dentistry these days is to save teeth if possible, so it won’t be like ‘going to the barber and asking if you need a haircut’.

fraserfella 12:02 am 02 Nov 14

put bonjela teething gel on them, it really works but unless you have a really big mouth with plenty of room your wisdom teeth will end up rotting and causing problems..

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