Mind the turtles

johnboy 3 November 2010 7

The Canberra Times is warning of the Chelonian menace as young horny turtles fling themselves under your car.

Mr Linke said the heavier rains meant the RSPCA had seen more eastern long-necked turtles in the past few months than in the past seven or eight years.

”Having all the rain has allowed them to feel confident about moving, because there’s plenty of food, plenty of other turtles out for mating and lots of water supply,” he said.

But they can come a cropper while trying to cross the territory’s roads.

The RSPCA is caring for up to five turtles that have been hit by cars and has released three back into Lake Ginninderra.

We’ll be yearning for drought soon enough.


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7 Responses to Mind the turtles
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p1 p1 1:10 pm 09 Nov 10

I saw one of these horny little fellows crossing Coppins Crossing Road this morning. He was already right on the edge heading into the grass so hopefully he was safe.

ConanOfCooma said :

Your calculations of “likelihood” are laughable. Despite having a small surface area, these guys have lots of lift when walking, and basically look like a really big rock in the middle of the road. You hit rocks? Is that what you’re saying? Because you can see rocks a mile away, unless you are doing something OTHER than looking at the road.

Although, they do tend to shut down when scared, for example when a car 30 seconds before you went right over the top of them. Then they are much harder to see. Although, as you said they still look kinda like a rock on the road, something I would usually manage to miss with my wheels.

vg said :

So what you’re suggesting is that people make a last minute, unannounced manoeuvre at up to 110km/h to avoid a turtle?

Every time you make a decision to do anything at 110km/h it is going to have potential ramifications. I’m glad all your driver training covered that.

ConanOfCooma ConanOfCooma 9:11 am 04 Nov 10

vg said :

Let’s see. Monaro Hwy has speed limits up to 100km/h. The likelihood is, at that speed, you are unlikely to see the turtle until the last second.

So what you’re suggesting is that people make a last minute, unannounced manoeuvre at up to 110km/h to avoid a turtle? What do you think the end result could be from said manouevre at said speed. I’d wager somewhat more significant than the death of a turtle.

Yes, hitting them deliberately is blatantly bogan and worthy of a mouth smack, but the ones you saw struck may have been the result of sensible driving.

And before you ask, unless you race V8 supercars I have had more driver training than you’re ever likely to have.

Dog runs onto road suddenly and you have to make the snap decision whether to veer into oncoming traffic or hit the dog. I’ll hit the dog every time

Your calculations of “likelihood” are laughable. Despite having a small surface area, these guys have lots of lift when walking, and basically look like a really big rock in the middle of the road. You hit rocks? Is that what you’re saying? Because you can see rocks a mile away, unless you are doing something OTHER than looking at the road.

Given their small surface area, you don’t need to deviate across the whole road to miss them – You just scoot over a teensy bit so they pass under you – I’m surprised your high level of driver training would draw you to a different conclusion.

And yes, when presented with an option between having a head on or running down a dog, I would of course hit the dog. But we’re not talking about a fast animal making a dash in front of your car, are we?

Kudos to your driver training – It doesn’t mean shit compared to experience. I trained as a boxer once, but I wouldn’t take on Danny Green.

vg vg 7:04 pm 03 Nov 10

ConanOfCooma said :

I’m glad this has been brought up, as I have seen at least 15 smashed to pieces on the Monaro Highway in the last week.

Idiots actually swerve to hit them, or simply don’t keep a competent eye on the road – The few I have stopped to help were long past assistance.

Let’s see. Monaro Hwy has speed limits up to 100km/h. The likelihood is, at that speed, you are unlikely to see the turtle until the last second.

So what you’re suggesting is that people make a last minute, unannounced manoeuvre at up to 110km/h to avoid a turtle? What do you think the end result could be from said manouevre at said speed. I’d wager somewhat more significant than the death of a turtle.

Yes, hitting them deliberately is blatantly bogan and worthy of a mouth smack, but the ones you saw struck may have been the result of sensible driving.

And before you ask, unless you race V8 supercars I have had more driver training than you’re ever likely to have.

Dog runs onto road suddenly and you have to make the snap decision whether to veer into oncoming traffic or hit the dog. I’ll hit the dog every time

p1 p1 4:51 pm 03 Nov 10

Jungle Jim said :

JessP said :

Typical youngsters. They just want to eat, drink and make out with the opposite sex.

More power to them, I say! Perhaps we need “Turtle Crossing” warning signs. Although, I’ll admit that I’ve never seen a koala cross the road in their designated crossing areas.

I’ve actually seen a turtle crossing sign. It was down the coast somewhere.

Jungle Jim Jungle Jim 3:32 pm 03 Nov 10

JessP said :

Typical youngsters. They just want to eat, drink and make out with the opposite sex.

More power to them, I say! Perhaps we need “Turtle Crossing” warning signs. Although, I’ll admit that I’ve never seen a koala cross the road in their designated crossing areas.

JessP JessP 10:57 am 03 Nov 10

Typical youngsters. They just want to eat, drink and make out with the opposite sex.

ConanOfCooma ConanOfCooma 10:31 am 03 Nov 10

I’m glad this has been brought up, as I have seen at least 15 smashed to pieces on the Monaro Highway in the last week.

Idiots actually swerve to hit them, or simply don’t keep a competent eye on the road – The few I have stopped to help were long past assistance.

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