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Mobile phones the bust of the month

By johnboy - 3 August 2011 32

For the months of August and September, ACT Policing will be targeting the use of mobile telephones while driving as part of its road safety campaign.

Research shows that driver distraction is a significant contributing factor in serious motor vehicle collisions. Throughout the next two months, all ACT Policing members will be actively looking for road users that are using their mobile telephone while driving without the correct mounting device in their vehicle.

ACT Policing has recently finished its traffic enforcement speeding campaign for June and July. During the campaign police issued 1,826 traffic infringement notices and cautions, a large number of which were ‘high speed’ traffic offences.

Twenty-six people were caught driving at very high-speeds with the highest recorded speed of 171km/h in an 80km/h zone committed by a 28-year-old man.

Over the past weekend (July 30-31) 15 drink drivers were apprehended, with a further nine motorists caught drink driving on Friday.

Officer in Charge of Traffic Operations, Sergeant Jeff Knight said that despite ACT Policing making steps forward in relation to road safety, these recent results are still very disappointing.

“To see traffic offences of this nature continuously being committed goes against the principles of road safety. Just like speed and driver distraction, driving while intoxicated can also play a significant part in a serious collision,” Sergeant Knight said.

“We don’t want to see officers knocking on the doors of family members and having to tell them that a loved-one has been killed in a collision that could have been avoided,” Sergeant Knight added.

[Courtesy ACT Policing]

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32 Responses to
Mobile phones the bust of the month
Jim Jones 11:56 am 04 Aug 11

Classified said :

Tooks said :

sandcaw said :

Overheard said :

I heard this on the news last night and thought, ‘Excellent’. Especially after seeing a woman on Flemington Rd on Monday, phone held up against one ear with one hand, gesticulating wildly with the other.

And I was reminded this morning as I drove down Bindubi Street and passed a police van, and Mr Plod the driver had his phone held up to his ear. “Do what we say…”

Class. I too recently was stopped at lights on Kingsford Smith Drive and a convoy of police cars went by…..with one of them on his mobile phone. Setting a great example – not. The amount of drivers on mobile phones in this City beggars belief. Theres no deterrent here. In the UK plain clothes police stand on the side of the road and report to an officer about passing drivers on their phones. Now there’s an idea.

Police are exempt. Maybe check the road rules before shooting from the hip.

So it’s not dangerous then?

Cops get particularly hardcore driver training, and often need to use phones/radios/etc to communicate about ‘incidents’ while they’re on the go.

I’m no fan of the cops most of the time, but the whole argument that ‘cops do it so it can’t be too dangerous’ or whatever has all the logic and emotional maturity of a playground hissy-fit.

Tooks 11:24 am 04 Aug 11

Classified said :

Tooks said :

sandcaw said :

Overheard said :

I heard this on the news last night and thought, ‘Excellent’. Especially after seeing a woman on Flemington Rd on Monday, phone held up against one ear with one hand, gesticulating wildly with the other.

And I was reminded this morning as I drove down Bindubi Street and passed a police van, and Mr Plod the driver had his phone held up to his ear. “Do what we say…”

Class. I too recently was stopped at lights on Kingsford Smith Drive and a convoy of police cars went by…..with one of them on his mobile phone. Setting a great example – not. The amount of drivers on mobile phones in this City beggars belief. Theres no deterrent here. In the UK plain clothes police stand on the side of the road and report to an officer about passing drivers on their phones. Now there’s an idea.

Police are exempt. Maybe check the road rules before shooting from the hip.

So it’s not dangerous then?

Not as dangerous as travelling at well over the speed limit to get to an emergency.

helium 10:48 am 04 Aug 11

Captain RAAF said :

If you can’t operate a car and use a phone at the same time then there is something wrong with you. I can eat a pie and drive at the same time, I can drink a can of coke and drive at the same time, I can sing along to my favourite Barry Manilow track and drive at the same time, what the hell difference does using a phone make?

Unless you are having a deep conversation with your pie or coke then there is a substantial difference as the conversation itself is what takes concentration. Also you can choose when to eat or drink and that is different to an unpredictable call, hunting for the phone, looking at the screen, etc.

Having one hand occupied in a manual car/truck/van (common in aus), means zero steering wheel control when you change gears or indicate (if you bother).

Captain RAAF said :

why haven’t I crashed into a bus load of nuns yet?

Because there aren’t enough nuns left in Canberra to fill a bus ?

I had a friend that crashed his car while drunk, wrote it off and not surprisingly the insurance company wont pay anything. Given that the police or insurance company could potentially check your phone records could they technically deem you liable/reduce liability for accident and injuries whilst on the phone and driving, as deliberate negligence ???, like they can for speeding, neg driving, etc.

shirty_bear 10:15 am 04 Aug 11

Captain RAAF said :

I can eat a pie and drive at the same time, I can drink a can of coke and drive at the same time, I can sing along to my favourite Barry Manilow track and drive at the same time, what the hell difference does using a phone make?

I once put it to one of the plod that phone-driving is no different to eating a McBurger while driving. The response was that burger-driving is also illegal, as you are required to have full two-handed control of the vehicle (assuming you actually have two hands, I suppose).

Last study I saw concluded that talking on a hand-held phone, talking on a hands-free phone, being an involved listener to a sporting event on the radio, and being right on the alcohol limit all had the same impairment effect on driving skills.

Captain RAAF 9:54 am 04 Aug 11

In one state in the US, the incidence of mobile phone use and motor vehicle accidents actually increased once it was outlawed. They found that while it was legal, most people could operate their motor vehicle safely whilst using their phone up at their ear but once the change came in and it was made illegal, people began to hide their phone use. Using a phone while it was hidden from view like down on their lap, drivers were paying less attention to the surrounds and taking their eyes off the road and more accidents being the end result.

If you can’t operate a car and use a phone at the same time then there is something wrong with you. I can eat a pie and drive at the same time, I can drink a can of coke and drive at the same time, I can sing along to my favourite Barry Manilow track and drive at the same time, what the hell difference does using a phone make?

Hell, sometimes I can do all three at once, why haven’t I crashed into a bus load of nuns yet?

Mysteryman 9:36 am 04 Aug 11

Oops, Henry82 already did so. Thanks!

Mysteryman 9:33 am 04 Aug 11

Tooks said :

sandcaw said :

Overheard said :

I heard this on the news last night and thought, ‘Excellent’. Especially after seeing a woman on Flemington Rd on Monday, phone held up against one ear with one hand, gesticulating wildly with the other.

And I was reminded this morning as I drove down Bindubi Street and passed a police van, and Mr Plod the driver had his phone held up to his ear. “Do what we say…”

Class. I too recently was stopped at lights on Kingsford Smith Drive and a convoy of police cars went by…..with one of them on his mobile phone. Setting a great example – not. The amount of drivers on mobile phones in this City beggars belief. Theres no deterrent here. In the UK plain clothes police stand on the side of the road and report to an officer about passing drivers on their phones. Now there’s an idea.

Police are exempt. Maybe check the road rules before shooting from the hip.

Perhaps you could provide us with a link to the rule that states police can talk on a mobile phone while driving? I’d be curious to see how it’s worded.

Henry82 9:29 am 04 Aug 11

sandcaw said :

a convoy of police cars went by…..with one of them on his mobile phone.

…The driver of a vehicle (except an emergency vehicle or police vehicle) must not use a mobile phone. http://www.police.act.gov.au/roads-and-traffic/use-of-mobile-phones.aspx (first sentence)

They can also speed, make illegal moves etc with or without lights/sirens on (within reason).

Classified 8:58 am 04 Aug 11

Tooks said :

sandcaw said :

Overheard said :

I heard this on the news last night and thought, ‘Excellent’. Especially after seeing a woman on Flemington Rd on Monday, phone held up against one ear with one hand, gesticulating wildly with the other.

And I was reminded this morning as I drove down Bindubi Street and passed a police van, and Mr Plod the driver had his phone held up to his ear. “Do what we say…”

Class. I too recently was stopped at lights on Kingsford Smith Drive and a convoy of police cars went by…..with one of them on his mobile phone. Setting a great example – not. The amount of drivers on mobile phones in this City beggars belief. Theres no deterrent here. In the UK plain clothes police stand on the side of the road and report to an officer about passing drivers on their phones. Now there’s an idea.

Police are exempt. Maybe check the road rules before shooting from the hip.

So it’s not dangerous then?

Overheard 8:55 am 04 Aug 11

Tooks said :

sandcaw said :

Overheard said :

I heard this on the news last night and thought, ‘Excellent’. Especially after seeing a woman on Flemington Rd on Monday, phone held up against one ear with one hand, gesticulating wildly with the other.

And I was reminded this morning as I drove down Bindubi Street and passed a police van, and Mr Plod the driver had his phone held up to his ear. “Do what we say…”

Class. I too recently was stopped at lights on Kingsford Smith Drive and a convoy of police cars went by…..with one of them on his mobile phone. Setting a great example – not. The amount of drivers on mobile phones in this City beggars belief. Theres no deterrent here. In the UK plain clothes police stand on the side of the road and report to an officer about passing drivers on their phones. Now there’s an idea.

Police are exempt. Maybe check the road rules before shooting from the hip.

“Shooting from the hip”?

Hardly.

It was merely a rather meek observation on the ‘one rule for us, one rule for them’ divide.

Tooks 8:28 am 04 Aug 11

sandcaw said :

Overheard said :

I heard this on the news last night and thought, ‘Excellent’. Especially after seeing a woman on Flemington Rd on Monday, phone held up against one ear with one hand, gesticulating wildly with the other.

And I was reminded this morning as I drove down Bindubi Street and passed a police van, and Mr Plod the driver had his phone held up to his ear. “Do what we say…”

Class. I too recently was stopped at lights on Kingsford Smith Drive and a convoy of police cars went by…..with one of them on his mobile phone. Setting a great example – not. The amount of drivers on mobile phones in this City beggars belief. Theres no deterrent here. In the UK plain clothes police stand on the side of the road and report to an officer about passing drivers on their phones. Now there’s an idea.

Police are exempt. Maybe check the road rules before shooting from the hip.

Watson 7:27 am 04 Aug 11

The one that gets my goat most is those pulling out of a carpark or driveway whilst on the phone. They’re often tradies too. Surely they could wait 30 seconds to finish their call before they drive off??

sandcaw 10:25 pm 03 Aug 11

Overheard said :

I heard this on the news last night and thought, ‘Excellent’. Especially after seeing a woman on Flemington Rd on Monday, phone held up against one ear with one hand, gesticulating wildly with the other.

And I was reminded this morning as I drove down Bindubi Street and passed a police van, and Mr Plod the driver had his phone held up to his ear. “Do what we say…”

Class. I too recently was stopped at lights on Kingsford Smith Drive and a convoy of police cars went by…..with one of them on his mobile phone. Setting a great example – not. The amount of drivers on mobile phones in this City beggars belief. Theres no deterrent here. In the UK plain clothes police stand on the side of the road and report to an officer about passing drivers on their phones. Now there’s an idea.

Overheard 9:52 pm 03 Aug 11

I heard this on the news last night and thought, ‘Excellent’. Especially after seeing a woman on Flemington Rd on Monday, phone held up against one ear with one hand, gesticulating wildly with the other.

And I was reminded this morning as I drove down Bindubi Street and passed a police van, and Mr Plod the driver had his phone held up to his ear. “Do what we say…”

helium 6:21 pm 03 Aug 11

..and about time too, many near misses, slow traffic, failure to indicate, drifting about, missing red lights all caused by being in the phone, this is dangerous and negligent. 3 points and $237 (I think, it may have gone up). I hope they start on Majura Rd and Fyshwick where frequently truckies and commercial vehicle drivers are on the phone.

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