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NBN rollout. To 2014 we wait (unless we live in Gungahlin)

By johnboy - 29 March 2012 48

fibre optics

Labor MLA Chris Bourke has tweeted the planned NBN rollout.

Coming up in Canberra is Belconnen, Crace, Civic, Deakin, Kambah, Manuka, Monash and Scullin.

Julia Gillard has announced she intends 135,000 homes, businesses, schools and hospitals to be connected in Canberra by mid 2014.

NBNco has an interactive map.

It appears outside of Gungahlin and Mitchell we’re all going to be waiting until [after] 2014.

UPDATE 29/03/12 15:44: Chief Minister Gallagher has expressed her joy at not being left out.

[Photo by rpongsaj CC BY 2.0]

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48 Responses to
NBN rollout. To 2014 we wait (unless we live in Gungahlin)
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CitizenK 10:56 am 30 Mar 12

Whatup guys

The majority of Canberra starting within 3 years. This is a big win locally.

The whole roll out is TEN YEARS. aren’t we lucky to get a start (and probably completion) before the full roll out is half over.

BTW – love reading all the ignorance around the technology. I am no expert, but some stuff in this thread is hilarious. (espec the association with asbestos and an outdated speed of light)

Dilandach 10:55 am 30 Mar 12

Deref said :

johnboy said :

I’ll bet you london to a brick that signing up to the filter scheme will be made so attractive that no ISP will choose to opt out. And with the copper network torn up and the high speed fibre there the alternatives will be very unattractive.

And if you think this will be by coincidence I’ve got a bridge to sell you.

If they’re going to censor us, they won’t need to make it attractive to ISPs – they’ll make it mandatory.

And, as I said, how you connect is irrelevant; once ISPs are required to “filter” content, it doesn’t matter whether you connect via the NBN, tin cans and string, telepathy or carrier pigeon – you’re still going to get censored.

Do not, under any circumstances, take this as support for it.

Which is why I said things were an impossible choice.

Labor – Good for NBN, Bad for censorship.
Coalition – Bad for NBN, good for censorship (so they say)

Damned if you do, damned if you don’t.

Deref 10:16 am 30 Mar 12

johnboy said :

I’ll bet you london to a brick that signing up to the filter scheme will be made so attractive that no ISP will choose to opt out. And with the copper network torn up and the high speed fibre there the alternatives will be very unattractive.

And if you think this will be by coincidence I’ve got a bridge to sell you.

If they’re going to censor us, they won’t need to make it attractive to ISPs – they’ll make it mandatory.

And, as I said, how you connect is irrelevant; once ISPs are required to “filter” content, it doesn’t matter whether you connect via the NBN, tin cans and string, telepathy or carrier pigeon – you’re still going to get censored.

Do not, under any circumstances, take this as support for it.

Deref 9:58 am 30 Mar 12

johnboy said :

At the moment it will take legislation to implement filtering. Once the government owns the network it can happen with a nod and a wink.

Though you’re absolutely right about Australia’s appalling attitude to censorship, you’re confusing the pipes with the flow.

The NBN won’t be mandatory – you’ll still be able to connect through other network providers, including satellite, providing that they maintain a physical infrastructure (which is questionable). But that’s irrelevant – owning the fibre doesn’t give the gubmint any more ability to censor the Internet than it already has. Censorship’s done at the ISP level, not the physical (i.e. fibre) level.

    johnboy 10:02 am 30 Mar 12

    I’ll bet you london to a brick that signing up to the filter scheme will be made so attractive that no ISP will choose to opt out. And with the copper network torn up and the high speed fibre there the alternatives will be very unattractive.

    And if you think this will be by coincidence I’ve got a bridge to sell you.

rosscoact 9:35 am 30 Mar 12

I-filed said :

rosscoact said :

how does one spell nah nah nah nah nah na?

already under construction, sweet

How do you spell nah nah nah nah nah nah, Gungahlinite? Here’s how I spell it:

“Takes me 7 minutes to drive to work at Parliament House from the inner north!”

Ha ha, wage slave, I work from home

spinact 1:01 am 30 Mar 12

I-filed said :

rosscoact said :

how does one spell nah nah nah nah nah na?

already under construction, sweet

How do you spell nah nah nah nah nah nah, Gungahlinite? Here’s how I spell it:

“Takes me 7 minutes to drive to work at Parliament House from the inner north!”

Bahahahah, thanks, this thread was getting way to serious and informative

caf 12:29 am 30 Mar 12

johnboy said :

the problem isn’t the engineering, it’s taking what’s supposed to be interconnected networks and having on great big one prone to a single point of failure.

There isn’t one single point of failure. The name “National Broadband Network” certainly conjures up an image of one giant network, but that’s misleading. The actual architecture is that the NBN provides “last mile” connectivity from the customer to the exchange, where the competing ISPs take over.

tommy 11:30 pm 29 Mar 12

I recently attended a Canberra Business Council lunch at the press club (kindly paid for by one of my contacts who needed to make up numbers on a table). Michael Malone from iinet was there to gloat and reassure Canberra how wonderful it was that iinet owned Transact.

Anyway, one of the concerning points he made about the NBN (all points he made were glowing) was that areas of Canberra serviced by Transact fibre cable were going to be considered by the government as “serviced adequately by the NBN”. Argh. The Transact plans are awful – and awfully expensive…

Bramina 11:17 pm 29 Mar 12

I-filed said :

“Work commenced refers to the date that NBN Co has completed the Network Design Document for a locality and signals the beginning of our engagement with your local community an…. “

I think we can add another few years on.

What do they need to consult with the community about anyway? Laying the cables is an engineering problem.

I-filed 9:13 pm 29 Mar 12

rosscoact said :

how does one spell nah nah nah nah nah na?

already under construction, sweet

How do you spell nah nah nah nah nah nah, Gungahlinite? Here’s how I spell it:

“Takes me 7 minutes to drive to work at Parliament House from the inner north!”

rosscoact 9:00 pm 29 Mar 12

how does one spell nah nah nah nah nah na?

already under construction, sweet

Grrrr 8:35 pm 29 Mar 12

dpm said :

I’m pretty naive, but it’s a pity they don’t just buy TransACT which is already in place for almost everyone?

TransACT isn’t in place for “almost everyone” and most of it’s subscribers are on networks nothing like the NBN. Their VDSL network is antiquated, except for the small percentage upgraded to VDSL2. The ADSL2+ network is no better than every other ISP in town. Their FTTH network IS just like the NBN – but only services a couple of Gungahlin suburbs.

dpm said :

why did iiNet buy it, if in ~3 years there will be a full NBN cable rollout?

Mostly (but not entirely) to get the subscribers. Scale is important with the NBN.

Read some Whirlpool about it.

Dilandach 8:12 pm 29 Mar 12

johnboy said :

I-filed said :

That’s END 2014 before they START work – there’s absolutely no firm commitment other than Gungers. By 2016, how up-to-date will the technology be?

As up to date as any other rollout started now.

And once you’ve got the fibre in the ground upgrading the routing is comparably easy (just like they’ve kept the speeds on the copper network going up and up.

the problem isn’t the engineering, it’s taking what’s supposed to be interconnected networks and having on great big one prone to a single point of failure.

o.O

Okay, that one is interesting. What has routing got to do with speeds on a copper medium?

Also, how do you figure that there’ll be a single point of failure?

As for by 2016 how good will the tech be? I honestly suggest you look up how optic communications work. As a very simple explanation, you have bundles of glass or plastic tubes (yes those pretty little christmas decorations with the light coming from the end of the strands are optic fiber). Lasers or Diodes at one end and sensors at the other of each strand. The only limit is the speed of light itself with the limit of what fiber optics can do for data transfer rates not even begun to be reached yet. It’s been used for decades already. I did read somewhere that someone had achieved 100 Terabits/sec transfer. Technology changes? You don’t dig up the optics, you change what is on each end.

What have they been using for submarine cables between countries since the late 80s? Optic fiber. Its not a technology that is near end of life nor going to be replaced for the foreseeable future. Wireless no matter how good it gets is nowhere near as good as fiber for a variety of reasons. Copper is end of life, its reached the limit of what can be pushed over it. We’ve already pulled the rabbit out of the hat in regards to keeping copper for that little bit longer.

Seriously, it doesn’t take much to do just a little bit of research on NBN/FTTN(H) that doesn’t include what a luddite such as Alan Jones or some other cranky ass baby boomer craps on about that doesn’t have a clue. Speak to anyone in the industry, an honest to god IT engineer. No, not the guy at Harvey Norman that’ll give you a swell deal on a HP Printer or that guy down the road that’ll fix your windows 95 boot problem.

This isn’t something that is being done for the current generation or the next, its something to last.

johnboy 7:43 pm 29 Mar 12

I-filed said :

That’s END 2014 before they START work – there’s absolutely no firm commitment other than Gungers. By 2016, how up-to-date will the technology be?

As up to date as any other rollout started now.

And once you’ve got the fibre in the ground upgrading the routing is comparably easy (just like they’ve kept the speeds on the copper network going up and up.

the problem isn’t the engineering, it’s taking what’s supposed to be interconnected networks and having on great big one prone to a single point of failure.

I-filed 7:41 pm 29 Mar 12

Read the fine print suckers! It’s all nonsense. “Work commenced” is just how they’re describing that they’ve done some basic design work and are ready to begin consultation and planning! And the map is useless – zoom in and the boundaries demarcating who will get NBN coverage conveniently (for Gillard & Conroy) disappears.

“These maps show the estimated likely coverage areas based on our rollout schedule, which may change following more detailed planning and design work.”

“Work commenced refers to the date that NBN Co has completed the Network Design Document for a locality and signals the beginning of our engagement with your local community and council that leads into the detailed design and field inspection work in your area. A rollout map showing the planned coverage area of the fibre or fixed wireless footprint in your community is issued within a month of work commencing.”

“* The boundary identifying areas where work is to commence within one and three years is indicative only. This boundary will disappear as you zoom into the map. “

Bramina 7:39 pm 29 Mar 12

They are rolling out to every one of the 6 independent’s electorates. Funny about that…

I-filed 7:33 pm 29 Mar 12

That’s END 2014 before they START work – there’s absolutely no firm commitment other than Gungers. By 2016, how up-to-date will the technology be?

goggles13 6:08 pm 29 Mar 12

cool Monash is going to be connected soon. once that happens, the rest of the rollout can take forever!!

DJY 3:50 pm 29 Mar 12

According to the new roll out maps on the NBN website…. the very northern end (new section) of Watson is now included in the work due to commence in the next 12 months (Pink shaded area)!

Anyone know any more about this?
I’ve emailed NBN… to confirm.

I always suspected Canberra wouldn’t be getting NBN across the city until the last stages of the rollout… Labor can’t afford lots of bad media about this – so can you imagine the news stories – saying Pollies were looking after themselves here in Canberra, before ‘normal everyday Australians’ across the country!

But yes despite that phrase… many of us in the ACT are stuck behind old / bad technology and can’t even get ADSL2/2+ yet – and no sign of NBN either it seems

watto23 3:13 pm 29 Mar 12

As a person with underground services that Transact decided to skip because it was going to cost them too much, I’m glad the NBN is being built. Although I do fear that It may take a lot longer to do the underground serviced houses…. I’m sick of my ADSL1 service. My only saving grace is i’m at least close to an exchange.

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