Skip to content Skip to main navigation

News

Avani Terraces - Greenway
Life is looking up

No licence, stolen car, doing a burnout, nailed.

By johnboy - 25 July 2011 31

A 24-year-old Campbell man was arrested by police yesterday afternoon (Sunday, July 24) after engaging in a pursuit through Lyons and Phillip.

About 4.20pm police were on mobile patrol in Weston when they saw a Holden Commodore travelling at speed along Hilder Street. Police observed the vehicle do a burnout at which stage they activated their lights and sirens in order to conduct a traffic stop. The vehicle failed to stop and a pursuit commenced until police lost sight of the vehicle on Hindmarsh Drive at which stage the pursuit was terminated.

About 4.35pm police received a call from a member of the public that a Holden Commodore had been dumped and that a male was seen running from the vehicle towards the Waramanga shops.

Police attended the Waramanga shops and identified a male who matched the description given by the witness. The man was arrested and taken to the ACT Watch House.

The Holden Commodore was later reported as stolen.

The man was charged with traffic offences including perform burnout in vehicle, drive motor vehicle without consent and drive while right to drive suspended. He will appear in the ACT Magistrates Court today.

[Courtesy ACT Policing]

What’s Your opinion?


Post a comment
Please login to post your comments, or connect with
31 Responses to
No licence, stolen car, doing a burnout, nailed.
Pork Hunt 6:16 pm 25 Jul 11

Tooks said :

watto23 said :

Who’d have thought the police used common sense to abort the chase rather than having a stupid law to govern it!!!

Most chases are aborted, boofhead.

Er Tooks… I think watto23 is on your side in this (as I am).

Innovation 6:05 pm 25 Jul 11

Proboscus said :

BenMac said :

breda said :

– is there any kind of patrol other than the mobile variety?

Bike patrol, foot patrol. I know they’re all of the “mobile” varity, but these are what they are called. Mobile patrol is vehicular.

Maybe some of you should head to afp.gov.au and keep an eye on the vacancies from time to time. If you can spend so much time critiquing media releases, maybe you should find a job writing them.

+1
How hard is it for you critical tossers to say “Good job guys – Well done”? Don’t bag the people who will be there for you when you so desperately need them.

+2
Also try substituting “when” for “at which stage” and see if the meaning doesn’t change. Glass houses……

Henry82 4:37 pm 25 Jul 11

Great job to the police who “apprehended” the driver.

However, if the person writing media releases isn’t a police officer, but is a professional writer, they need a new career.

triffid 4:35 pm 25 Jul 11

dpm said :

If I can redirect the conversation back to the actual subject behind the PR report (i.e the guy who stole a car, drove illegally/dangerously and ran from police), can I say well done to the good guys on this one!
As long as people like this are caught by the police, I’m not going to get too worked up about the grammatical correctness of the PR message…..

BenMac said :

Bike patrol, foot patrol. I know they’re all of the “mobile” varity, but these are what they are called. Mobile patrol is vehicular.

Maybe some of you should head to afp.gov.au and keep an eye on the vacancies from time to time. If you can spend so much time critiquing media releases, maybe you should find a job writing them.

Proboscus said :

BenMac said :

+1
How hard is it for you critical tossers to say “Good job guys – Well done”? Don’t bag the people who will be there for you when you so desperately need them.

(Dons fire suit and breathing apparatus. Assumes ‘duck and cover’ position)

Guys, guys, steady on! You’re asking just a bit too much I think. Do you not realise — just like in much public policy development — that everything needs to context and content neutral? Why, here in the real world, it is the important things that our contributors have pointed out that really matter, not, you know, the actual story that is being told.

Proboscus 4:17 pm 25 Jul 11

BenMac said :

breda said :

– is there any kind of patrol other than the mobile variety?

Bike patrol, foot patrol. I know they’re all of the “mobile” varity, but these are what they are called. Mobile patrol is vehicular.

Maybe some of you should head to afp.gov.au and keep an eye on the vacancies from time to time. If you can spend so much time critiquing media releases, maybe you should find a job writing them.

+1
How hard is it for you critical tossers to say “Good job guys – Well done”? Don’t bag the people who will be there for you when you so desperately need them.

BenMac 3:27 pm 25 Jul 11

breda said :

– is there any kind of patrol other than the mobile variety?

Bike patrol, foot patrol. I know they’re all of the “mobile” varity, but these are what they are called. Mobile patrol is vehicular.

Maybe some of you should head to afp.gov.au and keep an eye on the vacancies from time to time. If you can spend so much time critiquing media releases, maybe you should find a job writing them.

dpm 3:26 pm 25 Jul 11

breda said :

“About 4.20pm police were on mobile patrol in Weston when they saw a Holden Commodore travelling at speed along Hilder Street. Police observed the vehicle do a burnout at which stage they activated their lights and sirens in order to conduct a traffic stop. The vehicle failed to stop and a pursuit commenced until police lost sight of the vehicle on Hindmarsh Drive at which stage the pursuit was terminated.”
————————————————————————————
Another paragraph which schools could use as an example of how not to write clear, grammatical English:

– is there any kind of patrol other than the mobile variety?

– is there any way to travel other than ‘at speed’?

– PP has already mentioned the ‘observed do a burnout’ atrocity.

– ‘at which stage’ is gibberish in this sentence. Do they mean ‘when’?

– ‘activated their lights and sirens in order to conduct a traffic stop’ is also gibberish. I take it the objective was not to stop the traffic, just the one car. In any event, lights and sirens are not required ‘in order to’ conduct anything.

– another ‘at which stage’ presumably also meaning ‘when’, and of course

– the pompous and verbose use of ‘commenced’ and ‘terminated’ for started and stopped, or began and finished.

There is more, but you get the idea.

There must be at least one person in the media office who can write basic English – I have seen their work. But, there is at least one person who would have failed my sixth grade grammar test.

If I can redirect the conversation back to the actual subject behind the PR report (i.e the guy who stole a car, drove illegally/dangerously and ran from police), can I say well done to the good guys on this one!
As long as people like this are caught by the police, I’m not going to get too worked up about the grammatical correctness of the PR message…..

breda 1:52 pm 25 Jul 11

“About 4.20pm police were on mobile patrol in Weston when they saw a Holden Commodore travelling at speed along Hilder Street. Police observed the vehicle do a burnout at which stage they activated their lights and sirens in order to conduct a traffic stop. The vehicle failed to stop and a pursuit commenced until police lost sight of the vehicle on Hindmarsh Drive at which stage the pursuit was terminated.”
————————————————————————————
Another paragraph which schools could use as an example of how not to write clear, grammatical English:

– is there any kind of patrol other than the mobile variety?

– is there any way to travel other than ‘at speed’?

– PP has already mentioned the ‘observed do a burnout’ atrocity.

– ‘at which stage’ is gibberish in this sentence. Do they mean ‘when’?

– ‘activated their lights and sirens in order to conduct a traffic stop’ is also gibberish. I take it the objective was not to stop the traffic, just the one car. In any event, lights and sirens are not required ‘in order to’ conduct anything.

– another ‘at which stage’ presumably also meaning ‘when’, and of course

– the pompous and verbose use of ‘commenced’ and ‘terminated’ for started and stopped, or began and finished.

There is more, but you get the idea.

There must be at least one person in the media office who can write basic English – I have seen their work. But, there is at least one person who would have failed my sixth grade grammar test.

thatsnotme 1:42 pm 25 Jul 11

Keijidosha said :

I thought the sentence “Police observed the vehicle do a burnout …” was a doozy, and then the second last line of the media release almost made my brain explode.

I’m far from a grammar pedant, but that is a facepalm-worthy effort.

My favourite was ‘The vehicle failed to stop’. Must have had faulty brakes too then.

Tooks 1:26 pm 25 Jul 11

watto23 said :

Who’d have thought the police used common sense to abort the chase rather than having a stupid law to govern it!!!

Most chases are aborted, boofhead.

Keijidosha 1:15 pm 25 Jul 11

I thought the sentence “Police observed the vehicle do a burnout …” was a doozy, and then the second last line of the media release almost made my brain explode.

I’m far from a grammar pedant, but that is a facepalm-worthy effort.

KB1971 12:02 pm 25 Jul 11

I blame Campbell, its full of Bogans. They should build a fence around it to keep them in……..

watto23 11:30 am 25 Jul 11

Who’d have thought the police used common sense to abort the chase rather than having a stupid law to govern it!!!

p1 11:14 am 25 Jul 11

Is it Mully, Arisen from the Dead to Commit our Sins so that we may live for Eternity?

BenMac 10:35 am 25 Jul 11

Holden Commodore…..says it all really. It’s the car hoons love to drive and to steal.

1 2 3

Related Articles

CBR Tweets

Sign up to our newsletter

Top
Copyright © 2017 Riot ACT Holdings Pty Ltd. All rights reserved.
www.the-riotact.com | www.b2bmagazine.com.au | www.thisiscanberra.com

Search across the site