Skip to content Skip to main navigation

Community

Canberras newest Healthy Lifestyle Centre, Form Fitness. Transform.

P&C Tuckshops calling it a day

By johnboy - 13 March 2009 36

Way back when it made some sense for stay at home mums to go down and volunteer in the school tuck-shop at lunchtimes. They enjoyed the social aspects, the school could either make more money or lower prices, and parents could see what their kids were getting up to in school.

But in this modern era, where only the very wealthy can afford the luxury of mum staying home, the Canberra Times now reports that Parents and Citizens Associations have realised they can’t keep up the gig.

    ”The P&C council is actually considering whether we try talking to the Government about pulling out of running school canteens all together,” she said.

    ”Whether the provision of lunch is something the Government takes over is a question we are now asking ourselves.”

The rules have changed, and so must we.

What’s Your opinion?


Post a comment
Please login to post your comments, or connect with
36 Responses to
P&C Tuckshops calling it a day
Steady Eddie 3:01 pm 13 Mar 09

Furry Jesus said :

PreciousLilywhite said :

I think you’d all be surprised at how much tuck shops have changed.
No more pies, sausage rolls or even flavoured milk.
Its all fruit, fruit juice, multigrain sandwiches & soup if you want something hot. And don’t even mention the word ‘peanut’ lest you send someone into some sort of fit.

Yawn. Another peanut allergy skeptic. Hope you never find yourself in Emergency with an unconscious 4yo on your lap.

Don’t know how many school lunch order lists you’ve been looking at lately, but I’ve had access to 3 schools’ versions in the last few months for the little Jesi (Chocolate and Pikachu), and pies, sausgae rolls, mini-pizzas, chips, flavoured milk, fruit ‘juices’ are all still there, presumably for parents who don’t know any better themselves.

The cure for this so-called “peanut allegy” is to keep feeding the kid peanuts until they get immune to them. Start off with small amounts then steadily increase it until the kid doesn’t react anymore.

Disposable 2:58 pm 13 Mar 09

caf said :

What about carob buds and fruit balls?? Say it ain’t so…

Fruit balls where the goods. I can remember getting 50 for 50 cents one day and I was like the king of the school that lunch time.

I still remember they used to tell us carob buds were chocolate!

Furry Jesus 2:39 pm 13 Mar 09

PreciousLilywhite said :

I think you’d all be surprised at how much tuck shops have changed.
No more pies, sausage rolls or even flavoured milk.
Its all fruit, fruit juice, multigrain sandwiches & soup if you want something hot. And don’t even mention the word ‘peanut’ lest you send someone into some sort of fit.

Yawn. Another peanut allergy skeptic. Hope you never find yourself in Emergency with an unconscious 4yo on your lap.

Don’t know how many school lunch order lists you’ve been looking at lately, but I’ve had access to 3 schools’ versions in the last few months for the little Jesi (Chocolate and Pikachu), and pies, sausgae rolls, mini-pizzas, chips, flavoured milk, fruit ‘juices’ are all still there, presumably for parents who don’t know any better themselves.

Ruby Wednesday 2:34 pm 13 Mar 09

My primary school had the parents donate the food as well as staff it. It was open three days a week, and once a week I would be given a giant Tupperware container full of pikelets to drop off at the tuckshop.

This was in rural Queensland. At high school, we had the ordering system for special hot food (brown paper bag with money stickytaped on) and mothers, supervised by a paid tuckshop convenor, did all the serving and whatnot at break times.

A sausage roll and a chocolate Breaka was my standard lunch, so this was clearly before the healthy times rolled around!

PreciousLilywhite 2:08 pm 13 Mar 09

Im sure the canteen would make a hot single mum/single dad Brady Bunch Lunch dating scene.

colourful sydney rac 1:57 pm 13 Mar 09

I went along to help at my daughters school canteen – took time off work to do it. THe woman running the canteen told me she had never, in her 10 years there, had a man come to help.

Skidbladnir 1:35 pm 13 Mar 09

So the days of little kids being fleeced by bigger kids (“Trade you this 50c coin for that $2 one, mine’s bigger so its worth more”) or anybody asking “How many lollies can I get for dis much monies?” are gone?

OH NOES!

AngryHenry 12:40 pm 13 Mar 09

So there’ll be a whole generation who will never know the meaning of ‘tuckshop lady arms’.

Probably a good thing. They are gross.

caf 12:38 pm 13 Mar 09

What about carob buds and fruit balls?? Say it ain’t so…

PreciousLilywhite 12:35 pm 13 Mar 09

I think you’d all be surprised at how much tuck shops have changed.
No more pies, sausage rolls or even flavoured milk.
Its all fruit, fruit juice, multigrain sandwiches & soup if you want something hot. And don’t even mention the word ‘peanut’ lest you send someone into some sort of fit.
Apparently, the kids don’t mind it though.
I’ve always thought that the schools should provide a simple lunch…but then again I’ve always thought that parents should pay school fees too.

sepi 12:22 pm 13 Mar 09

At my school we had ‘lunch orders’ where you wrote what you wanted on a paper bag, and put the money in it, and they were collected early by a fish and chip shop, and a box of lunches was dropped back at lunchtime.

So kids can still get food if there is nothing in the house before school, without parents having to turn up as free labour.

ant 11:31 am 13 Mar 09

at grammar, the lady who ran the tuckshop was paid, and she organised a roster of parents, and also the girls were rostered on, we all had our recess/lunch shifts serving. The mums worked a longer shift, buttering the bread, cutting things up, putting the sausage rolls in teh ovens etc.

Primal 10:22 am 13 Mar 09

Or pull the plug on canteens altogether and let lunchboxes rule the day.

Furry Jesus 10:19 am 13 Mar 09

School canteens can provide significant opportunities for parents to get to know each other and build up peer networks. These can be vital for families needing help with their children, e.g. sharing the burden of transport to weekend sport, emergency after-school child-minding, having someone to support you when school-friends reach their adolescence and start lying to their parents about whose place they’re sleeping over at…Can’t see the paid employees helping out with that.

Still, there’s always the P&C meetings, but who has time to attend those, and they always seem to go on forever – last thing I feel like doing is staying around to meet new people.

Trunking symbols 9:13 am 13 Mar 09

When I started at Phillip College in the 1970s my mother asked whether she could serve in the canteen like she had done at my previous schools. She was told that the canteen workers were all paid employees and that parents would not be required. The idea that in 2009 we still have schools using parents as cheap labour in the tuck shops is remarkable. They should all be paid employees employed by the Education Department (or whatever they’re calling it this week).

1 2 3

Related Articles

CBR Tweets

Sign up to our newsletter

Top
Copyright © 2017 Riot ACT Holdings Pty Ltd. All rights reserved.
www.the-riotact.com | www.b2bmagazine.com.au | www.thisiscanberra.com

Search across the site