Pet shops and puppy farms. How should I find the right dog?

embilly 19 July 2021 64

Hi Rioters

There has been huge press lately about puppy farms. I don’t want to support these atrocities.

However what I am wondering, are there pet shops which actively DO NOT support puppy farming?


READ ALSO: The best pet rescue shelters in Canberra


I was in a pet store in Civic yesterday (Pet’s Paradise) as I am considering a dog but having trouble finding the right breed for me. The shop keeper assured me they do not support Puppy Farms, and that their dogs come from ethical breeders etc etc. I really wanted to believe what he was saying, but I don’t know how am I supposed to know if I’m doing the right thing.

Can anyone share their experiences regarding this? Any advice about how we should go about finding the right dog for us? We tried the RSPCA first but they only have really BIG dogs!

(we want a smaller breed, we live in a townhouse with a small but lovely garden. I work from home so am looking for a little friend to hang with). I’ve had dogs before and understand the commitment involved.

Thanks!!!


What's Your Opinion?


Please login to post your comments, or connect with
64 Responses to Pet shops and puppy farms. How should I find the right dog?
Filter
Order
TheObserver TheObserver 4:10 pm 08 Oct 10

I would always prefer to get a dog as a pup (very important if you have kids) from a place where you can see it interact with siblings and you can have a look at not only its parents but the conditions that all the dogs are kept in. Otherwise from a pet rescue place or RSPCA but I did find that when enquiring about dogs some of the fosterers were a tad on the precious side – and I found the RSPCA did not keep me informed or return calls.

Oleala Oleala 3:57 pm 05 Oct 10

Embilly have you thought about an older dog from a registered breeder. Breeders will sometimes place older dogs that may not have worked out for the show ring for various reasons. If you decide on a particular breed (or breeds) have a look at DogzOnline (www.dogzonline.com.au) at the Mature Dogs section, there are usually quite a few listings.

Captain RAAF Captain RAAF 11:00 am 04 Oct 10

Find a good dog in your neighborhood and entice it into your yard with food and pats and stuff, then claim him as yours. A haircut and maybe a backyard tail docking will remove all suspicion from the old owners if they happen to see him on the end of your leash.

Microchips are always in the same general area (base of the neck), just probe around until you find it……might need to muzzle fido while you do though.

Tooks Tooks 5:37 pm 03 Oct 10

cleo said :

Tooks

You usually pay more for pedigree papers

No you don’t – well you shouldn’t have to anyway. I pay about $1000 for pups, which includes everything: pedigree papers, vaccination records (distemper, hepatitis, parvovirus, leptospirosis, coronavirus) tattooing, microchipping, breed survey certificate, hip and elbow dysplasia certificate (showing no defects), registration papers, diet/supplementation advice etc.

Although I don’t breed or show dogs, I’m happy to pay that much to ensure I have a dog which has been bred for good temperament, not inbred, and which is hopefully free of defects. Backyard breeders don’t come near to this level of detail and will attempt to cut their overheads so they can profit from each litter.

In my example above, $1000 might seem like a lot, but take out vet costs, stud fees, feeding etc, and the breeders don’t make a lot of money.

cleo cleo 4:02 am 03 Oct 10

Tooks

You usually pay more for pedigree papers, I didn’t think they did that anymore, only if your breeding the pup, alot has changed since I bought a dog years ago, I once bought a cocker spaniel, we bought her from someone in Victoria out at Lang Lang, I decided to breed her but before I did this I took the dog to a Judge how breeds and shows dogs, she told me that the head was not proportioned, she also told me the women is question interbred her dogs, and that one of the sire rs was one of her champions that went back abit, I gave the dog to my sister as I was going to live overseas, well the poor dog died at three years of age, my sister and her husband were so upset they had a postmortem done on her, the dog had a massive heart attack.

Tooks Tooks 5:04 pm 02 Oct 10

cleo said :

Tooks

The breeder didn’t lie to me, she informed me that the pup had a hernia, the dogs there were well looked after, she also fed them high quality pet food, which I saw for myself, she also had the pups vet checked and also my pup had her first needle done for her against parvo, I had all the papers stating so, and stamped by her vet, I also met both parents of my pup, the site was nothing like what threepaws put on his blog, the dogs had plenty of room to move about in open yard pens, all keep clean, she also knew my pups personality, which she was correct about, she mentioned that my pup was very playful and liked her food. She called her dogs by name.

threepaws

The above does not come close to where my daughters bought my pup

Backyard breeders aren’t necessarily bad people, nor does it mean they don’t know what they’re doing. But unlike registered breeders who are primarily in it to improve the breed (they’ll always provide you with pedigree papers etc), backyard breeders are in it more for the money (generally speaking). Certainly no breeder I’ve ever met would sell a pup with any kind of health problems (including hernias).

You got a dog you’re happy with, and that’s good, but the situation you described sounds like a case of backyard breeding.

cleo cleo 12:20 am 02 Oct 10

Tooks

The breeder didn’t lie to me, she informed me that the pup had a hernia, the dogs there were well looked after, she also fed them high quality pet food, which I saw for myself, she also had the pups vet checked and also my pup had her first needle done for her against parvo, I had all the papers stating so, and stamped by her vet, I also met both parents of my pup, the site was nothing like what threepaws put on his blog, the dogs had plenty of room to move about in open yard pens, all keep clean, she also knew my pups personality, which she was correct about, she mentioned that my pup was very playful and liked her food. She called her dogs by name.

threepaws

The above does not come close to where my daughters bought my pup

threepaws threepaws 9:05 am 30 Sep 10

@ Cleo #55

Regardless of my profession, I have bothered to take some time to educate myself on the subject. Perhaps you should do the same, because if you think that simply being ‘nice’ means you are not a backyard breeder you clearly have a lot to learn.

http://www.wheredopuppiescomefrom.com.au/
http://www.closepuppyfactories.org/
http://www.deathrowpets.net/
http://oscarslaw.org/index.php
http://www.rspca.org.au/how-you-can-help/campaigns/puppy-farms.html

Tooks Tooks 5:28 pm 29 Sep 10

cleo said :

threepaws #51

I’d hardly call a dog having this type of problem having psysical abnormalities

Really? What would you call it then? Threepaws was spot on in that post. Backyard breeding.

embilly embilly 4:08 pm 29 Sep 10

Hi prhhcd – it seems I have to be a premium member (?) to PM you. I’m not sure how this works. Are you able to post a link or something on here?

Thanks!

cleo cleo 12:00 am 29 Sep 10

threepaws #51

I’d hardly call a dog having this type of problem having psysical abnormalities, I met my dog’s parents, they were both healthy, the woman was a caring person, if she wasn’t she would have distroyed the other dog with similar problems, the woman also said if there were any problems to let her know. I do know about dog breeders, I have had friends who breed dogs, and often helped out when they went away, they would bring some dogs to breed over from England so the dogs would not be interbreed. Most humans have psysical abnormalities, do we just pick the strongest gene pool?

la mente torbida la mente torbida 1:31 pm 28 Sep 10

P.S. The most important period for a puppy to develop their behaviour is the imprinting period (6 to 10 weeks). Pet shop pups spend this time in a glass cage with shoppers tapping the glass all day long and then they are abandoned during the period 6pm to 9am. I am happy to be corrected.

la mente torbida la mente torbida 1:24 pm 28 Sep 10

The RSPCA and dog rescue organisations will NOT sell you a dog/pup that has problems. Decent breeders will NOT sell you a pup/dog where you are not able to meet the parents to determine temperament . Enough said.

threepaws threepaws 11:09 am 28 Sep 10

cleo said :

I got my dog out of CT, it was a breeder from Yass, she is a little toy poodle, I’m allergic to most dogs, but poodles agree with me, she is just a lovely little girl, great temperament, a beautiful little dog, actually my daughters brought her for me, the breeder asked my daughter if I wanted to breed, my daughter said no, I was informed that she had a groin hernia, when I had her de-sexed it turned out it wasn’t a hernia, but skin attached to her stomach, if my daughters had not bought her for me, she would have been left there, as another dog had the same condition, the breeder kept her as no one wanted her, which is silly, as the problem can be fixed when de-sexed.

Well, this is a good example of ‘backyard breeding’ at its worst. For sale through the paper, giving your daughter’s the option of irresponsible breeding to make some quick $$$, and physical abnormalities in the puppies that are presumably the result of breeding from a poor genetic pool.

prhhcd prhhcd 10:14 am 28 Sep 10

local breed associations, dog clubs, RSPCA, Companion Animals, DAS etc. ALL pet stores that sell puppies/kittens are supplied by breeders who obviously don’t give a rats … Otherwise they wouldn’t trust a third party, interested in profit to sell their animals.
There is a very good small dog breeder in Brookam. PM me if you would like her details.

Vegemite Vegemite 9:55 am 28 Sep 10

I second (third, fourth, fifth…. whatever it is up to!) getting a rescue dog. We got a little foxie through adoptarescuedog.com and he is an absolute little gem. He had belonged to an elderly person who went into a home and was surrendered by the family and we were so pleased to give him a second chance at life. Being a mature dog he didn’t need to be housetrained and was over any kind of crazy behaviour. Now he spends his days asleep on the lounge for around 7 hours a day and then showers us with love when we get home from work. Kate from adoptaresucedog was great as well in recommending him to us.

Buzz2600 Buzz2600 9:40 am 28 Sep 10

Great to see some many people are against puppy mills. Only problem is, identifying which puppy comes from a genuine caring breeder as opposed to a puppy mill can be difficult – sometimes they are indistinguishable. If considering a breed, I would suggest viewing the establishment of the breeder first. Having witnessed where our first dog was bred, we bought her on the spot simply to get her the heck out of that hell-hole.

Another problem not brought up here, is in-breeding (otherwise called line breeding) causing conformation and genetic problems such as breathing difficulties, hip dysplacia and epilepsy in dogs (for examples).

A Heinz variety dog is more likely to have a robust constitution and better genetics than line bred dogs. If you’re after a specific breed, question the breeder closely and investigate any potential health issues. Our beautiful border collie was dumped because she had epilespy & the previous owner was not interested in treating her (a simple matter of giving her a pill each day). The trauma of seeing her having an fit is enough to ensure I will do everything I can to ensure I never breed or own another dog with such issues.

Good luck & hope you find your next best friend soon!

Belles Belles 8:15 am 28 Sep 10

As a foster carer myself I would say the best idea is to go through a foster carer. I personally help care for dogs through Canberra pooch rescue http://www.canberrapoochrescue.org.au/, but you can also go through Petrescue http://www.petrescue.com.au/ where all the foster carers advertise their dogs.

As a carer we must look after the dog for a minimum of 2 weeks, this gives us enough time to see how the dog reacts to people/cats/other dogs and to be able to give advice on the best home for the dog. We also see how much training the dog may allready have and to start training the dog. This helps because when you get the dog there shouldn’t be too many surprises as the carers will be able to tell you what the dogs nature is like.

Once a person has adopted a dog we also give them a 2 week trial period in-case things go wrong once the 2 week period is over if the new family is happy with the dog then they get signed over to them. This ensures that everybody is happy and comfortable and that if there is something not working the dog doesn’t end up back in the pound again.

If you are after a pup there are quite often little pups around and unfornately after christmas there will be lots of them.

If you look at going through a breeder always ask if you can go visit the dogs and see how they are kept. This way you can asses how the dogs have been treated and if you are happy with it. If they say no that you can not do that, then I wouldn’t buy from them because you have no gurantees on how the dogs are treated.

cleo cleo 11:48 pm 27 Sep 10

I got my dog out of CT, it was a breeder from Yass, she is a little toy poodle, I’m allergic to most dogs, but poodles agree with me, she is just a lovely little girl, great temperament, a beautiful little dog, actually my daughters brought her for me, the breeder asked my daughter if I wanted to breed, my daughter said no, I was informed that she had a groin hernia, when I had her de-sexed it turned out it wasn’t a hernia, but skin attached to her stomach, if my daughters had not bought her for me, she would have been left there, as another dog had the same condition, the breeder kept her as no one wanted her, which is silly, as the problem can be fixed when de-sexed.

Xie Xie 9:27 pm 27 Sep 10

Churl, if Embilly goes down the rescue route, I’d suggest a dog that has been in foster care for some time with a rescue group such as ARF or one of the others named above. A foster carer can assess the dog’s social skills in a home situation and with other dogs, children, other animals, etc. Sorry to hear about your friend.

CBR Tweets

Sign up to our newsletter

 Top
Region Group Pty Ltd

Search across the site