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Calls for ban on Dutch pancakes, chips on sticks at Multicultural Festival

By Charlotte Harper 15 February 2016 42

Dutch Pancakes

A Change.org petition is calling on the ACT Government to ban the popular Dutch pancake and chips on sticks stalls at the National Multicultural Festival.

The petition, created by Matthew Archer, argues on its Change.org page that the stalls should go not because of their lack of nutritional value, nor because they’re readily available throughout the year elsewhere (and in the case of chips on a stick, not in keeping with the multicultural theme), but because their queues are too long.

Archer writes that the event celebrates the “multicultural foundations of our great country, however there are certain elements that dampen the atmosphere of the event.”

“Chips on a Stick and Dutch Pancakes are two of the most popular stalls, and are overcrowding the festival with multiple sites, and lines as long as fifty metres,” he adds.

“These lines inhibit crowd movement, causing dangerous bottlenecks on the festival site that pose a serious safety risk to all patrons.

“I propose that these two stalls be removed from the multicultural festival in years to come, in order to facilitate crowd movement and safety, as well as to help patrons step out of their comfort zone and embrace other cultures they may not have encountered, which previously might not have been visible through the huge crowds of people blocking the frontage of other stalls while waiting for their Dutch pancakes.”

Reactions on the Change.org site and the small number of supporters who have signed the petition to date (16 when we last checked) would indicate he will not receive enough support to be taken seriously by the government (or anyone else for that matter). That’s if he is indeed wanting to be taken seriously and it’s not just a wind-up.

“Chip on a stick is one of the most reactionary foods since smashed avocado with quinoa risotto,” writes Dylan Clements on the petition page

“Dutch pancakes are a confusing size,” adds Joseph Buckmaster.

“Garema Place is chocked by pancake (dutch) like a person who is also chocked [sic] on a dutch pancake (OH&S risk), blocking the flow of the oesophagus (multiculturalism) into our belly (Canberra)” says Leon Twardy.

RiotACT tends to agree with Steven Pennington, who writes: “I’m signing this because culture isn’t just white carbs and fats.”

What’s Your opinion?


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42 Responses to
Calls for ban on Dutch pancakes, chips on sticks at Multicultural Festival
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london 3:50 pm 27 Feb 16

Why is this festival held when it is so hot. Would be so much more pleasant if held in autumn.

bikhet 6:07 pm 22 Feb 16

HenryBG said :

dungfungus said :

You and I call them (potato) scallops but I deliberately referred to them as “potato cakes” for the benefit of the majority of our pro-Victorian leaders of our bush capital.

I don’t think anybody should be afforded that benefit – the more they hear the grown-ups talking sensibly, the sooner they too will pick up the habit.

Enough of this Sydney linguistic imperialism! It’s potato cakes, and that’s all there is to it!!!!!!!!!

I’d have written this in green ink, but I haven’t figured out how.

Nilrem 3:55 pm 22 Feb 16

dungfungus said :

HenryBG said :

dungfungus said :

I wonder if the multi-cultural festivals in other countries have food stalls selling Australian food like chiko rolls, battered savs, potato cakes, bacon and egg rolls (probably banned in Europe by now) etc.

I doubt Europe will ever develop a need for Chiko rolls, but one thing that is sorely lacking is the meat pie. I don’t think anywhere in Europe or Britain has anything as good as an aussie meat pie.

Also, we don’t have “potato cakes”: that’s the limp-sounding name assigned to them in England. The Australian version is the manly-sounding “potato scallop”.

Personally, I find a lot of the food at the multicultural festival is either
– stuff you can get in the shops any day of the week
– awful carny fare (eg, the infamous chip-on-a-stick)
– dodgy-looking stuff brought into civic in big pots in the back of a rusty stationwagon.

Bottom line is this: eating chip-on-a-stick might be a sign of a complete lack of imagination, it’s also the thing least likely to give you food poisoning.

You and I call them (potato) scallops but I deliberately referred to them as “potato cakes” for the benefit of the majority of our pro-Victorian leaders of our bush capital.
From Merimbula south they are called “potato cakes” and the further south you go the more bland they are.
I agree totally with you other comments on this thread.

Jeez, those Victorians will drive a long way for a decent beach. 🙂

HenryBG 1:00 pm 22 Feb 16

dungfungus said :

You and I call them (potato) scallops but I deliberately referred to them as “potato cakes” for the benefit of the majority of our pro-Victorian leaders of our bush capital.

I don’t think anybody should be afforded that benefit – the more they hear the grown-ups talking sensibly, the sooner they too will pick up the habit.

dungfungus 8:53 am 22 Feb 16

HenryBG said :

dungfungus said :

I wonder if the multi-cultural festivals in other countries have food stalls selling Australian food like chiko rolls, battered savs, potato cakes, bacon and egg rolls (probably banned in Europe by now) etc.

I doubt Europe will ever develop a need for Chiko rolls, but one thing that is sorely lacking is the meat pie. I don’t think anywhere in Europe or Britain has anything as good as an aussie meat pie.

Also, we don’t have “potato cakes”: that’s the limp-sounding name assigned to them in England. The Australian version is the manly-sounding “potato scallop”.

Personally, I find a lot of the food at the multicultural festival is either
– stuff you can get in the shops any day of the week
– awful carny fare (eg, the infamous chip-on-a-stick)
– dodgy-looking stuff brought into civic in big pots in the back of a rusty stationwagon.

Bottom line is this: eating chip-on-a-stick might be a sign of a complete lack of imagination, it’s also the thing least likely to give you food poisoning.

You and I call them (potato) scallops but I deliberately referred to them as “potato cakes” for the benefit of the majority of our pro-Victorian leaders of our bush capital.
From Merimbula south they are called “potato cakes” and the further south you go the more bland they are.
I agree totally with you other comments on this thread.

HenryBG 9:28 pm 21 Feb 16

dungfungus said :

I wonder if the multi-cultural festivals in other countries have food stalls selling Australian food like chiko rolls, battered savs, potato cakes, bacon and egg rolls (probably banned in Europe by now) etc.

I doubt Europe will ever develop a need for Chiko rolls, but one thing that is sorely lacking is the meat pie. I don’t think anywhere in Europe or Britain has anything as good as an aussie meat pie.

Also, we don’t have “potato cakes”: that’s the limp-sounding name assigned to them in England. The Australian version is the manly-sounding “potato scallop”.

Personally, I find a lot of the food at the multicultural festival is either
– stuff you can get in the shops any day of the week
– awful carny fare (eg, the infamous chip-on-a-stick)
– dodgy-looking stuff brought into civic in big pots in the back of a rusty stationwagon.

Bottom line is this: eating chip-on-a-stick might be a sign of a complete lack of imagination, it’s also the thing least likely to give you food poisoning.

Masquara 12:32 pm 20 Feb 16

Velianth said :

YES! A thousand times yes! Who thought it would be a good idea to cram the festival in to the centre of Civic, in a pokey little plaza in front of a major shopping centre that is full of random objects? 😐 On top of that you have displays on the roads which serves to both impede traffic and risk the safety of the participants at the same time (eg: I encountered dancers last year on London Circuit; there were no protections for them, not even a single policeman or plastic barrier. One moment of inattention could have led to awful consequences), as well as hordes of pedestrians crossing the road.

In my opinion the only petitions that should be circulating (serious or not) at the moment is moving the venue somewhere that doesn’t clog the city infrastructure and provides a greater level of safety for the participants. I’m reasonably sure that EPIC, for example, would be a much better option. If it can support the Canberra Show and the National Folk Festival, it should be more than capable of supporting the Multicultural Festival.

Would the great informal plaza in Barton where Hustle and Scout are run perhaps work, between John McEwen Crescent and National Circuit, next to that weird new carpark/hotel building?

dungfungus 2:06 pm 19 Feb 16

Masquara said :

Let’s be thankful for small mercies. At least no-one has claimed to be offended by the inclusion of pork on some stalls.

Was it “pulled”?

MERC600 1:43 pm 19 Feb 16

paservank said :

Dear Mr Archer,

It appears that some a**hole is signing your name to stupid petitions.

http://www.lettersofnote.com/2011/02/regarding-your-stupid-complaint.html

Thank you Paservank. That gave me a good chuckle which I need at the moment as I’v picked up a dose of the flu.

Spiral 11:35 am 19 Feb 16

Perhaps next year they should move the festival to Glebe park as practice for Floriade.

paservank 9:54 am 19 Feb 16

Dear Mr Archer,

It appears that some a**hole is signing your name to stupid petitions.

http://www.lettersofnote.com/2011/02/regarding-your-stupid-complaint.html

Masquara 6:22 pm 18 Feb 16

Let’s be thankful for small mercies. At least no-one has claimed to be offended by the inclusion of pork on some stalls.

Velianth 4:55 pm 18 Feb 16

Blen_Carmichael said :

Some quality trolling there I think

I would love to think that this was trolling, but knowing some of the people in the ACT, I just can’t be sure. lol

bd84 said :

The whole event inhibits crowd movement because it’s poorly planned, jammed into a small space with random obstacles everywhere, no crowd control or barriers etc. It needs to be moved to a more appropriate location before someone gets hurt and/or killed from falling over and getting trampled.

YES! A thousand times yes! Who thought it would be a good idea to cram the festival in to the centre of Civic, in a pokey little plaza in front of a major shopping centre that is full of random objects? 😐 On top of that you have displays on the roads which serves to both impede traffic and risk the safety of the participants at the same time (eg: I encountered dancers last year on London Circuit; there were no protections for them, not even a single policeman or plastic barrier. One moment of inattention could have led to awful consequences), as well as hordes of pedestrians crossing the road.

In my opinion the only petitions that should be circulating (serious or not) at the moment is moving the venue somewhere that doesn’t clog the city infrastructure and provides a greater level of safety for the participants. I’m reasonably sure that EPIC, for example, would be a much better option. If it can support the Canberra Show and the National Folk Festival, it should be more than capable of supporting the Multicultural Festival.

Crazed_Loner 4:46 pm 18 Feb 16

This dingbat has it the wrong way around. I saw heaps of people of different non-European ethnic backgrounds – Middle Eastern, Indian, African and Asian – all thoroughly enjoying chips-on-a stick.

Chips-on-a stick is the true multicultural food!

wottaway 4:02 pm 18 Feb 16

The word is ‘choked’…not ‘chocked’.

    Charlotte Harper 11:39 am 19 Feb 16

    Yep. I left it spelt as the author had it on the Change.org site because it was a direct quote. I’ve now added a [sic] to make that clear, thanks.

pink little birdie 11:13 am 18 Feb 16

Apsara said :

They’ve got it all wrong.

The Canberran way is simply a matter of economics. INCREASE the amount of chip on a stick and dutch pancake stalls – and flood the market. No queues that way because customers evenly spread out to the different stalls. Then create a licence to sell these items and have govt regulate the market. Then tax the buggery out of the stall holders for having such great food. This will then dissuade any stall owners from ever investing in potatoes or pancakes. Simple!

There were at least 2 that I counted.

I’m looking forward to the Canberra show to have my “chip on a stick” I think they are delicious but there are much more interesting things to try at the multicultural festival so I don’t get “chip on a stick” there.
A lot of the food at the multicultural festival is much harder to get than dutch pancakes and “chip on a stick” which are at every major event now.

rubaiyat 1:33 am 18 Feb 16

Having done more than my share of stalls at school fetes and other social fundraisers, I can attest that getting anything “different” doesn’t even cross the minds of attendees.

Nor in most cases do the words “please” and thank you”.

Crazy notions of what is “authentic” and “healthy” contribute to the bland generic food. You see the same sausages, kebabs and fries everywhere because the stalls give up on a public who pay way over the top without caring what they put in their mouths. Why bother fighting it?

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