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Point to point camera legislation introduced.

By johnboy - 30 June 2011 115

speed camera

Simon Corbell has announced he’s introduced a bill to start up point-to-point cameras.

“The first point-to-point system will be installed on Hindmarsh Drive and is expected to become operational in the second half of 2011.

The system uses cameras equipped with with Automated Number Plate Recognition (ANPR) technology, and scans photographs to identify vehicle numberplates. The system takes time-stamped photographs of the back of vehicles as they pass two places (detection points) to calculate the vehicle’s average speed between those points. If the average speed exceeds the average speed limit between those points, the driver may be charged with a speeding offence.

For those wanting more detail the Forward Design Study is available.

Simon promises your privacy will be protected to the same standard as other ACT Government projects.

It’s all for your own safety of course.

What’s Your opinion?


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115 Responses to
Point to point camera legislation introduced.
watto23 2:16 pm 30 Jun 11

It woulkd be great if speed limits were set reasonably. Of course this debate could go on forever, but i’m wondering now when the Monaro duplication through Fyshwick is completed, what the speed limit will be, given its 80 now but 100 leading up to the merging lanes.

If they were being consistent it would be 100 all the way through fyshwick to the next intersection where an 80 would be… And then when the majura parkway gets doen it would be 100 the whole way.

I’m not looking to start arguements, but there are plenty or roads in Canberra where the speed limit “could” be higher and thus many people speed on there. No excuse of course. And after seeing how courteous many drivers in Europe are its no wonder we have problems when people are unable to change lanes in Canberra and instead pick a lane and sit in it…. which then forces speeding drivers to become even worse.

These point to points will cause drivers to slow down of course, but we’ll be reading the complaints of people finding drivers realising its point to point and virtually slowing down to 20 below just to make sure, or how about the cautious drivers who seem to slow to 70 on 80 roads when a camera is about….

But I’d rather have these then pay higher rates and rego i guess.

chewy14 2:12 pm 30 Jun 11

colourful sydney racing identity said :

Cue the hysteria of the ‘it’s my right to break the law because I am an awesome driver and can do it safely’ brigade.

Cue the “speed limits are all perfectly set and the government would never use cameras for revenue raising brigade”.

Oh wait, you’re already here.

Henry82 2:05 pm 30 Jun 11

Jivrashia said :

Isn’t there one already being used on the Federal Highway?
Actually that’s NSW side of the border…
In the news: NSW target ACT drivers to help pay for the massive budget blowout.

Implying NSW drivers who visit Canberra never return home?

Also, there’s a speedtrap near the intersection of the Federal highway and Antill St. Does that mean Canberra is targeting NSW motorists?

qbngeek 1:57 pm 30 Jun 11

MERC600 said :

Well they will make a killing from Hume to Symonston along the Monaro. But won’t this mean that speedy type people will then realise they will need to slow down, ending in a queue of drivers beatling along at say 70 , trying to get their average speed to 80. Causing congestion perhaps.

Or people could just 80 the entire time and then they would be fine *thumbs up*

dpm 1:50 pm 30 Jun 11

MERC600 said :

Well they will make a killing from Hume to Symonston along the Monaro. But won’t this mean that speedy type people will then realise they will need to slow down, ending in a queue of drivers beatling along at say 70 , trying to get their average speed to 80. Causing congestion perhaps.

Maybe for a day or two, but what moron would do that every day when they could just drive at 80 the whole distance and get there in the same time? Wait a sec…..

MERC600 1:35 pm 30 Jun 11

Well they will make a killing from Hume to Symonston along the Monaro. But won’t this mean that speedy type people will then realise they will need to slow down, ending in a queue of drivers beatling along at say 70 , trying to get their average speed to 80. Causing congestion perhaps.

Skidbladnir 1:33 pm 30 Jun 11

This is proposed first as a speed camera strategy (costing $360,000 per site upfront, but has an element on Pg10 of the Forward Design Study stating “However, analysis suggests that depending upon traffic volumes and infringement rates the revenue from infringement notices are likely to repay the capital costs of the roadside infrastructure in under 12 months.”).
Within that same doucment, it identifies the intention to become the eyes-and-ears of both the proposed ACT Traffic Management Centre, and provide immediate speed-offence recognition, but with a bonus (highly costly and development likelyhood undetermined) element providing ACT Policing with Non-Traffic Related Offence Interrogability support, and “Mass Survellance” capacity.

(IE: “Did car with registration YXX-999 drive between Tuggeranong, Civic or Gungahlin by any route recently?”)

Good luck to the ACT Government when they immediately fail a privacy audit if they pursue either of those further options.

@Primal:
That would be a Safe-T-Cam at Marulan.

dpm 1:33 pm 30 Jun 11

Hey, here’s an idea, let’s have another debate about speeding and speed cameras! It’s been a few days…. Mr G?

Jivrashia 1:28 pm 30 Jun 11

Isn’t there one already being used on the Federal Highway?
Actually that’s NSW side of the border…

In the news: NSW target ACT drivers to help pay for the massive budget blowout.

Swaggie 1:27 pm 30 Jun 11

and of course people in stolen cars will immediately stick to the speed limit…..

Doc Dogg 1:20 pm 30 Jun 11

Lets hope they are more accurate than the ones on the Hume Hwy

http://www.heraldsun.com.au/news/more-news/our-dud-speed-cameras/story-fn7x8me2-1226080249071

Speed cameras on the Hume Highway will be switched off indefinitely after a top-level inquiry found drivers were wrongly booked.
A hi-tech fault led to fines being wrongly issued nine times, according to a $131,000 report by top accounting firm Deloitte that was released to the Herald Sun last night.
Thousands of motorists pass the disabled point-to-point cameras every day.
RACV general manager of public policy Brian Negus told heraldsun.com.au this morning the introduction of an independent road-safety commissioner was the vital link in addressing the problem.
“I think it’s really important that the credibility of speed cameras is restored,” he said.

Mr Negus said the commissioner was the best way to assure the public the issue of faulty cameras was being taken seriously.
“That’s a critical link in the whole debate,” he said.
The report found the false bookings happened because the time on a camera clock was out of synchronisation with its global positioning system’s time.

Cameras at the centre of the investigation imposed 3657 fines in the three months to June last year, reaping an average minimum of $53,000 a week.

The point-to-point system records vehicle details and the time it takes to pass between cameras.

Critics said the system was less trustworthy than fixed cameras because it did not have the same capability to check for mistakes.

Speed camera crusader John King, who won a court battle against a fine in 2007, said his trust in the system had not been restored.

“If they switch them back on, they’re open to the same problems,” he said. “The truth is, how to we know (they are accurate)?”

The Deloitte investigation was sparked when a Wallan woman was served with an impoundment notice after being clocked travelling at 154km/h in a 110km/h zone in a Mazda 2.

The P-plater, who faced a 12-month licence suspension, was able to persuade a local police officer she was telling the truth.

The finding could impede any legal action launched by motorists claiming they had been wrongly fined.

Results of the report have been passed to the Auditor-General, who is investigating the state’s speed-camera network.

No decision will be made on returning the Hume Highway cameras to operation until the Auditor-General hands down his report, expected in September.

Police Minister Peter Ryan said most of the $131,000 cost of the Deloitte report had been covered by a fine on the operator Redflex.

The Government last month introduced legislation to appoint an independent road-safety camera commissioner.

Victoria’s speed camera system has been bedevilled by problems for years.

More than $13 million in fines was refunded over 19 faulty cameras on Western Ring Road in 2003.

In 2006, cameras on West Gate Bridge were shut down amid worries about the quality of images.

Many drivers continue to dispute fines from cameras on the EastLink freeway.

qbngeek 1:18 pm 30 Jun 11

Hopefully this will slow down some of the morons on Hindmarsh that think 110 in an 80 zone is okay.

colourful sydney rac 1:12 pm 30 Jun 11

Cue the hysteria of the ‘it’s my right to break the law because I am an awesome driver and can do it safely’ brigade.

Primal 1:09 pm 30 Jun 11

Last time I drove back from Sydney I saw (one part of) what appeared to be a point-to-point camera setup at the Truck Weigh Station near Marulan. Are these operating in NSW already or was I seeing things?

Disinformation 12:59 pm 30 Jun 11

I now feel a little bit justified in being suspicious of the layout of the cameras along the Monaro, Parkway and Barton highways when they were first installed. If this wasn’t a long term idea that someone had back then, I’ll be amazed.

I will now expect far greater speed camera vandalisation and number plate obfuscation too, of course.

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