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Point to point cameras go live in 10 days time

By johnboy - 17 February 2012 185

hindmarsh drive p2p cameras

Justice and Community Safety want the word to know that the Hindmarsh Drive point to point cameras are commencing operations from 27 February 2012:

During the testing of the point to point cameras, speed measurements taken by the camera system indicated approximately800 motorists a day are speeding along the stretch of road where the cameras will shortly commence operating. 
 
“Unfortunately it appears that many ACT motorists continue to speed, in spite of the risks that this behaviour presents to them, their passengers and other road users,” Ms Greenland said. 
 
The point to point system uses cameras equipped with Automated Number Plate Recognition (ANPR) technology and scans photographs to identify vehicle numberplates.   
 
The system takes time-stamped photographs of vehicles as they pass two places (detection points) set at a known distance apart.  It then matches images, calculates the time difference and determines the vehicle’s average speed between those points.  If the average speed exceeds the average speed limit between those points, an infringement notice for a speeding offence may be issued. 
 
“Strong safeguards to protect personal information have been incorporated in the road transport legislation, including explicit restrictions on access to and use of these images.  The images from the point to point cameras are not capable of identifying vehicle occupants and images that do not show offences will be destroyed after 14 days,” Ms Greenland said.   
 
The location of the first point to point cameras on Hindmarsh Drive was determined following an assessment of sites suitable for these cameras taking into account road safety and traffic considerations.   
 
“Hindmarsh Drive was the highest ranked site against the relevant criteria, which included crash history,” Ms Greenland said. 
 
“During the period 2004 to 2008 there were 538 crashes, including 17 injury crashes, on the Hindmarsh Drive corridor where the cameras are located.”

[Photo Courtesy of TAMS


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185 Responses to
Point to point cameras go live in 10 days time
mossrocket 11:23 am 17 Feb 12

the speed logging sign post is way off as well – I went past it this morning at 90kmh on my speedo (which – with the size of my wheels being different to the stock wheels that the speedo was calibrated against – is actually 80kmh), and it said I was doing 64kmh…

mossrocket 11:20 am 17 Feb 12

I propose a new sport…

Whoever has to park for the longest time at the side of the road before they pass the second camera wins!

So – drivers could go over the hill at 250 kmh and park for 30 minutes and not get a fine.

Anyone want to design the iPhone app to track times and upload them to a website*

*may be used as evidence against you in a court of law…

Tooks 11:19 am 17 Feb 12

basketcase said :

As usual, nothing to do with road safety, since when did cameras prevent accidents.

It’s all about revenue.

Let me guess – you are a regular viewer of A Current Affair and/or Today Tonight?

There are numerous studies saying otherwise. I’ve probably said this before, but if you are caught by a speed camera then you are driving with your head up your arse. These point to point cameras are no different.

Speed cameras only catch speeding drivers who aren’t paying attention to their surroundings. Drivers who don’t pay attention to their surroundings (such as the big speed van 200m up the road) are dangerous. These are the drivers who deserve to be fined.

dpm 11:17 am 17 Feb 12

I wonder if the Govt will be nice enough to reduce (even slightly!) land rates or parking fees once this revenue cash cow is switched on?! 🙂

bd84 11:14 am 17 Feb 12

If the cameras in Victoria can’t be proven as accurate when they’re on sections of road which are dead flat and smooth, I wish the ACT Government luck in defending all the accuracy challenges when they have placed them on a rough road that has very steep inclines and declines. I’m guessing they would have very high tolerance levels built in..

Rather a stupid place to put them as usual. While there have been speed related crashes along there, from memory both were at least 10 years ago and I would say most crashes that occur along that stretch of road are related to drivers not paying attention, tailgating or illegal lane changes. But never mind, they won’t bother policing those because they can make far more money catching people speeding when rolling down the hills.

dtc 11:10 am 17 Feb 12

watto23 said :

Speed alone is rarely the cause, its just easier to catch speeding than it is to catch distracted drivers on mobiles, listening to loud music, trying to block other traffic to stop them from speeding etc etc.

I agree speeding is easy, I also think that those other issues you mentioned are more or less impossible to police

Special G 11:02 am 17 Feb 12

Of course it is about road safety. New, safer roads cost lots of money which the government needs to raise through voluntary contributions such as speed camera fines.

Solidarity 11:01 am 17 Feb 12

There would have been less people speeding if they didn’t have those signs that tell you what your speed is. Heaps of people have been trying to see how high they go….

NoImRight 10:55 am 17 Feb 12

watto23 said :

Speed alone is rarely the cause, its just easier to catch speeding than it is to catch distracted drivers on mobiles, listening to loud music, trying to block other traffic to stop them from speeding etc etc.

Agree speed is not the only reason but its always one of them.

basketcase 10:52 am 17 Feb 12

As usual, nothing to do with road safety, since when did cameras prevent accidents.

It’s all about revenue.

Erg0 10:51 am 17 Feb 12

“During the period 2004 to 2008 there were 538 crashes, including 17 injury crashes, on the Hindmarsh Drive corridor where the cameras are located.”

I wonder how many of those were rear-enders caused by people jamming on their brakes when they see a speed van?

Seriously though – any thoughts on where these crashes would be occurring on a (relatively) straight stretch of road with good visibility? The only potential black spot I can think of is that stupid, stupid intersection on the northbound side, just over the crest of the hill. Speeding traffic obviously doesn’t help there, but if there are lots of accidents then the correct action would be to just block the damn thing off.

Lazy I 10:40 am 17 Feb 12

Spectra said :

“During the period 2004 to 2008 there were 538 crashes, including 17 injury crashes, on the Hindmarsh Drive corridor where the cameras are located.”

Always amusing to see statistics like this thrown into statements which imply, merely by their presence, that there is a link. How many of those crashes actually had speed as a key contributing factor? Oh, we’re not given that bit of information, in spite of the fact that it’s rather crucial to assessing the relevance of this statistic.

It is intentionally ambiguous.

The ‘Hindmarsh Drive corridor’ would include the entire length of Hindmarsh drive not just the ‘corridor’ that these cameras are located on.

In any given week I would see 3 or 4 cars busted up in afternoon traffic (from Woden) at the Hindmarsh Drive -> Parkway turn off. Everyone comes in far too hot in the right lane and then lock up when they realise the traffic is banked up from under the bridge wanting to turn right onto the Parkway.

http://goo.gl/bX5I2

watto23 10:36 am 17 Feb 12

Speed alone is rarely the cause, its just easier to catch speeding than it is to catch distracted drivers on mobiles, listening to loud music, trying to block other traffic to stop them from speeding etc etc.

Tooks 10:36 am 17 Feb 12

Spectra said :

“During the period 2004 to 2008 there were 538 crashes, including 17 injury crashes, on the Hindmarsh Drive corridor where the cameras are located.”

Always amusing to see statistics like this thrown into statements which imply, merely by their presence, that there is a link. How many of those crashes actually had speed as a key contributing factor? Oh, we’re not given that bit of information, in spite of the fact that it’s rather crucial to assessing the relevance of this statistic.

Well if the cameras detected 800 people a day speeding in that particular corridor, then it’s probably not a big stretch to assume a good proportion of those prangs involved excessive speed. As you said though, there’s no way of knowing.

Spectra 10:18 am 17 Feb 12

“During the period 2004 to 2008 there were 538 crashes, including 17 injury crashes, on the Hindmarsh Drive corridor where the cameras are located.”

Always amusing to see statistics like this thrown into statements which imply, merely by their presence, that there is a link. How many of those crashes actually had speed as a key contributing factor? Oh, we’re not given that bit of information, in spite of the fact that it’s rather crucial to assessing the relevance of this statistic.

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