Police Powers – up for discussion

johnboy 15 May 2010 26

Simon Corbell has announced the release of a discussion paper: Review of Police Criminal Investigative Powers.

The Review of Police Criminal Investigative Powers Discussion Paper considers a broad range of police powers and advocates the modernisation and consolidation of those powers into a single piece of legislation.

“The aim of these proposals is to provide the courts, legal practitioners and the community with a single source of legislation for all police criminal investigative powers.

The discussion paper deals with police powers like arrest procedures, search provisions, protections and safeguards for those in custody and how police treat those in custody.”

They’re open for submissions until 30 June.


What's Your Opinion?


Please login to post your comments, or connect with
26 Responses to Police Powers – up for discussion
Filter
Order
Pork Hunt Pork Hunt 6:31 pm 17 May 10

Spideydog said :

Isn’t that the reason for this discussion ….. to make sure Police powers are up to date with modern times and technology ???

Perhaps I need to clarify my comments. I believe that we don’t need any more NEW laws regarding powers of arrest or carrying out searches with or without warrants etc.

Tinkering with CURRENT laws for technological reasons or new drugs etc should be carried out for sure.

Deadmandrinking Deadmandrinking 12:49 pm 17 May 10

Spideydog said :

Pork Hunt said :

The only things that might need tinkering with from time to time is to make allowances for new technology (for e.g. the Internet)or when some bonehead invents a new drug which is then added to the naughty list.

Isn’t that the reason for this discussion ….. to make sure Police powers are up to date with modern times and technology ???

DMD – 2 years is excessive m8. By the time the two years are up, they will have lost interest. It’s not that “glamorous” of a job, for people to wait 2 years for 🙂

What if you were paid the same as doctors? Would that be worth 2 years? There needs to be more training for police in areas like mental health, which they’ll come across quite frequently in the line of duty. Perhaps if police had a better understanding of certain mental disorders, there’d be less disasters and less of a need for their firearms (I’m mostly speaking in terms of NSW and VIC here).

colourful sydney racing identity colourful sydney racing identity 11:20 am 17 May 10

EandIprefix said :

These police are not using their existing powers inappropriately: last weekend just because I was driving a sports car I was followed by an unmarked police brand new Toyota Landcruiser from my street corner to my destination at a church carpark ( a distance of 15 kilomatres including turning into many different streets ) where the vehicle following me did a u-turn next to my car in the carpark then left me alone. My workplace has a number of independent expert witnesses have also been discussing an unmarked utility being used to catch-out drivers.

I really doubt the police would spend this amount of time unless there was a very good reason.

Spideydog Spideydog 11:13 am 17 May 10

Yeah, I should have said that as well, but I was thinking more along the lines of that person being “followed”. Not saying that that vehicle was not an unmarked police vehicle. I was just putting out more possibilities than the apparent obvious.

p1 p1 10:41 am 17 May 10

You are aware that quite a few people do try and impersonate or look like police vehicles don’t you, by installing multiple aerials and lookalike internal lights ??

You are aware of course, that many people these days have extra areials on their cars for mobile phones and radios?

p1 p1 10:13 am 17 May 10

That’s so scarey! If that had happened to me I’d be phoning the police to report a stalker who followed me to Church and apparently knew where to find me!

Really? I’d make random turns to see if they were following me, then engage in intentionally suspicious activity to see if they were genuinely interested, then park somewhere and wander over and ask how they were doing.

Spideydog Spideydog 9:52 am 17 May 10

BimboGeek said :

Spideydog said :

You are aware that quite a few people do try and impersonate or look like police vehicles don’t you, by installing multiple aerials and lookalike internal lights ?? (uniformed cops are a different matter)

I wasn’t aware. Is this a thing? What’s the motivation?

I better clarify, there is a few that will make their car look like an unmarked car, but almost none will try to pull people over and actually impersonate a police officer.

Why some do it ?? There would be a few reasons I suspect. Try to divert real police attention away, thinking they are a un-marked vehicle (that doesn’t work) or they like the reaction from people when they think they are a un-marked police vehicle. Could be any amount of reasons though.

Spideydog Spideydog 9:38 am 17 May 10

Captain RAAF said :

Torchodor,

You don’t need to be an Intello to go overseas and take no part in any action, all whilst living in a protected compound! You can live just as protected a life while serving in an arms corps!! Very few of our boys on the ground are actually out in injun country contacting the enemy but they need people like the ‘intello’ to ensure their safety!

As for the Police, they have a union, serving military members do not. The Police have the option to go on strike if they so desire and bring to public attention any issues that they think are not fair and equitable, defence members have none of these options.

So sure, there are perks of serving your country that come up every now and then if not rarely, but there are a great many more that you just have to cop on the chin ALL THE TIME, like moving your entire family across the country every three or so years (sometimes more often) dragging your kids out of schools, your spouse from their job, how many times will an ACT police officer be required to move house and leave everything behind?

I do agree though on the point that more should be done for Police as it is a relatively thankless job, but as I said earlier, they have a union, if they don’t like their lot in life they can bloody well fight for it.

But there is plenty of ACT police members going on deployment for months on end, leaving family behind and serving this country too. You make it sound like the Police force can go on strike willy nilly …… Pretty hard to when they are an emergency service in all ….. When was the last time ACT Police went on strike ?? A union does not = Action I’m afraid. As a final thought, I think that shift work is just as, if not more disruptive than defence postings. (I have worked both)

I am not down playing the work done and sacrifice defence members make, but neither for Police members 😉

BimboGeek BimboGeek 9:35 am 17 May 10

EandIprefix said :

I was followed by an unmarked police brand new Toyota Landcruiser from my street corner to my destination at a church carpark ( a distance of 15 kilomatres including turning into many different streets ) where the vehicle following me did a u-turn next to my car in the carpark then left me alone.

That’s so scarey! If that had happened to me I’d be phoning the police to report a stalker who followed me to Church and apparently knew where to find me! Maybe it was a robber wanting to know I wouldn’t be home for a while. I think assuming it was a police car who didn’t like sports cars says more about your unhealthy attitude to police than the actual actions of police.

Spideydog said :

You are aware that quite a few people do try and impersonate or look like police vehicles don’t you, by installing multiple aerials and lookalike internal lights ?? (uniformed cops are a different matter)

I wasn’t aware. Is this a thing? What’s the motivation?

georgesgenitals georgesgenitals 9:25 am 17 May 10

Spideydog said :

georgesgenitals said :

Spideydog said :

georgesgenitals said :

Many unmarked police cars aren’t difficult to spot. Tell tale signs include multiple aerials and uniformed cops in the front seat, and in some cases internal flashing lights mounted on the dashboard.

You are aware that quite a few people do try and impersonate or look like police vehicles don’t you, by installing multiple aerials and lookalike internal lights ?? (uniformed cops are a different matter)

Yep, I know a guy who did that, but years ago.

Personally, I’d rather see a lot more marked police presence.

Fair enough, but how do we know how much is enough ? There needs to be some element of un-marked cars to catch the stuff the marked cars “scare” off 🙂

Agreed – hence my comment above about having more police.

Spideydog Spideydog 9:12 am 17 May 10

georgesgenitals said :

Spideydog said :

georgesgenitals said :

Many unmarked police cars aren’t difficult to spot. Tell tale signs include multiple aerials and uniformed cops in the front seat, and in some cases internal flashing lights mounted on the dashboard.

You are aware that quite a few people do try and impersonate or look like police vehicles don’t you, by installing multiple aerials and lookalike internal lights ?? (uniformed cops are a different matter)

Yep, I know a guy who did that, but years ago.

Personally, I’d rather see a lot more marked police presence.

Fair enough, but how do we know how much is enough ? There needs to be some element of un-marked cars to catch the stuff the marked cars “scare” off 🙂

Captain RAAF Captain RAAF 8:43 am 17 May 10

Torchodor,

You don’t need to be an Intello to go overseas and take no part in any action, all whilst living in a protected compound! You can live just as protected a life while serving in an arms corps!! Very few of our boys on the ground are actually out in injun country contacting the enemy but they need people like the ‘intello’ to ensure their safety!

As for the Police, they have a union, serving military members do not. The Police have the option to go on strike if they so desire and bring to public attention any issues that they think are not fair and equitable, defence members have none of these options.

So sure, there are perks of serving your country that come up every now and then if not rarely, but there are a great many more that you just have to cop on the chin ALL THE TIME, like moving your entire family across the country every three or so years (sometimes more often) dragging your kids out of schools, your spouse from their job, how many times will an ACT police officer be required to move house and leave everything behind?

I do agree though on the point that more should be done for Police as it is a relatively thankless job, but as I said earlier, they have a union, if they don’t like their lot in life they can bloody well fight for it.

georgesgenitals georgesgenitals 7:40 am 17 May 10

Spideydog said :

georgesgenitals said :

Many unmarked police cars aren’t difficult to spot. Tell tale signs include multiple aerials and uniformed cops in the front seat, and in some cases internal flashing lights mounted on the dashboard.

You are aware that quite a few people do try and impersonate or look like police vehicles don’t you, by installing multiple aerials and lookalike internal lights ?? (uniformed cops are a different matter)

Yep, I know a guy who did that, but years ago.

Personally, I’d rather see a lot more marked police presence.

Torchordor Torchordor 12:28 am 17 May 10

Dead Man drinking said:

“This may sound weird coming from me…but pay police more, much more”

What about changing some of the conditions to match those of the troops who head off overseas. Go to Iraq for example as an Intello and see no action apart from what you can hear, and live in a protected compound for 6 months equals …..life time health and dental free! Hand to hand combat in the streets of Canberra with a violent agressive numpties every day ……benefits nil! Go figure?

Spideydog Spideydog 5:42 pm 16 May 10

georgesgenitals said :

Many unmarked police cars aren’t difficult to spot. Tell tale signs include multiple aerials and uniformed cops in the front seat, and in some cases internal flashing lights mounted on the dashboard.

You are aware that quite a few people do try and impersonate or look like police vehicles don’t you, by installing multiple aerials and lookalike internal lights ?? (uniformed cops are a different matter)

Spideydog Spideydog 5:38 pm 16 May 10

Pork Hunt said :

The only things that might need tinkering with from time to time is to make allowances for new technology (for e.g. the Internet)or when some bonehead invents a new drug which is then added to the naughty list.

Isn’t that the reason for this discussion ….. to make sure Police powers are up to date with modern times and technology ???

DMD – 2 years is excessive m8. By the time the two years are up, they will have lost interest. It’s not that “glamorous” of a job, for people to wait 2 years for 🙂

Pork Hunt Pork Hunt 2:43 pm 16 May 10

The police already have enough powers. They had enough powers before 9/11 caused John Howard to add new laws.
The only things that might need tinkering with from time to time is to make allowances for new technology (for e.g. the Internet)or when some bonehead invents a new drug which is then added to the naughty list.

Tooks Tooks 2:29 pm 16 May 10

Deadmandrinking said :

This may sound weird coming from me…but pay police more, much more.

In exchange, make sure their powers are kept in check and their actions under intense scrutiny. Paying them more, however, will justify the risks and difficulties of of the job (which are already under-compensated). Considering that police have the power to take away someone’s freedom over suspicion means that they must be accountable for everything they do.

I personally think paying them the same as doctors, considering what they have to go through, is only fair. If they can get money to pay senior public servants to sit around and do nothing in departments that deal with stuff that doesn’t really deserve a singular department, they should be able to find the money to pay cops what they deserve.

More training is needed too. 9 months or so then out on the street with a gun is not beneficial for society, or for the police. I’d say a minimum of two years before they’re out on patrol.

Police actions are already under intense scrutiny, so I don’t think that’s really an issue.

Regarding training, ACT police recruits go through about 20 weeks training before they’re out on the street. Is it enough? I don’t know. Is 2 years too much? Definitely. You can do all the training in the world, but it won’t truly prepare a recruit for what they will face, no matter how much ‘realistic’ scenario based training they do.

georgesgenitals georgesgenitals 12:23 pm 16 May 10

Spideydog said :

And your point being ?? How is it you know that you were followed “just because I was driving a sports car” ?? How did you identify it was an unmarked police vehicle ??

Many unmarked police cars aren’t difficult to spot. Tell tale signs include multiple aerials and uniformed cops in the front seat, and in some cases internal flashing lights mounted on the dashboard.

Of course, the police will no doubt have some genuine undercover vehicles, and these wouldn’t be so obvious.

Deadmandrinking Deadmandrinking 11:51 am 16 May 10

This may sound weird coming from me…but pay police more, much more.

In exchange, make sure their powers are kept in check and their actions under intense scrutiny. Paying them more, however, will justify the risks and difficulties of of the job (which are already under-compensated). Considering that police have the power to take away someone’s freedom over suspicion means that they must be accountable for everything they do.

I personally think paying them the same as doctors, considering what they have to go through, is only fair. If they can get money to pay senior public servants to sit around and do nothing in departments that deal with stuff that doesn’t really deserve a singular department, they should be able to find the money to pay cops what they deserve.

More training is needed too. 9 months or so then out on the street with a gun is not beneficial for society, or for the police. I’d say a minimum of two years before they’re out on patrol.

CBR Tweets

Sign up to our newsletter

Top

Search across the site