Police Wrap – 8 November 2010

johnboy 8 November 2010 52

1. Say Something Day:

ACT Policing and Crime Stoppers ACT are gearing up for a national phone-in day on Friday November 19, as part of a nationwide offensive – codenamed Operation Unification – against amphetamine production and distribution.

The national Crime Stoppers campaign kicks off today (Monday, November 8 ) as the lead-up to “Say Something Day” on November 19 when everyone in the community is encouraged to speak up if they have information relating to the production and distribution of amphetamines.

While the focus of this campaign will be on amphetamines and amphetamine production, ACT Policing (ACTP) would urge the community to contact Crime Stoppers with information on any illicit drug-related activity.

Focused national efforts such as this operation, using the Crime Stoppers information-gathering capability, helps increase police intelligence on organised crime groups and can help lead to arrests.

ACT Policing has had a productive partnership with Crime Stoppers for almost two decades. During this time there have been a number of significant arrests and seizures of property and drugs. This has occurred due to information received from members of the public calling Crime Stoppers.

In the past financial year alone (2009-2010), Crime Stoppers ACT received 5162 calls and 640 web-based reports. Of these, 1195 were converted to information reports. As a result of these reports, information was provided to assist in the apprehension of 35 people with a total of 97 charges.

Anyone who has information about illicit drug activity is urged to call the Crime Stoppers toll-free hotline on 1800 333 000 and talk to police in confidence.

Crime Stoppers and police would encourage members of the public to take an active role on November 19 in making our community safe. Illicit drugs are a major problem for all communities and cause major social problems, resulting in significant social costs.

Current Australian Crime Commission data places the cost of illicit drugs at over $10 billion annually in social costs. This includes the cost of hospitalisation, rehabilitation, violence, death, injury on the roads and lost days at work.

Added to this is the actual cost of the illicit drugs themselves. Around 45 per cent of illicit drug users admit to being involved in criminal behaviour to feed their habit.

Although a clandestine laboratory for the manufacture of illicit drugs has not been detected in the ACT since 2007, recent reports indicate that the number of clandestine laboratories across the country is increasing.

The Crime Stoppers hotline provides a mechanism for the public to confidentially help police attack the organised manufacture and distribution of illicit drugs and really make a difference.

Some of the “telltale” signs which may indicate a home or commercial premises is being used for illicit drug production are:

• Drawn curtains and/or shielded windows during daylight hours;
• Persons carrying laboratory glassware into the premises;
• Extensive and excessive security systems;
• Frequent visitors to premises who only stay for short periods of time;
• Persistent chemical smells;
• Chemical/fertiliser/empty pill/capsule containers in rubbish;
• Pool-cleaning equipment around a house with no swimming pool;
• Excessive chemical containers for premises;
• Suspicious run-offs into drains.

People can still call Crime Stoppers on the phone-in day with information on any other criminal matters or suspicious behaviour, or make a report via the website at www.act.crimestoppers.com.au.

2. Boy and Girl Racers no more:

ACT Policing has seized two cars and will summons two drivers for illegal street racing after an incident in Belconnen late last night (November 6).

Around 11.30pm last night, officers in an unmarked police vehicle were patrolling in Belconnen when they observed a red Holden utility and a green Nissan 200SX stopped at the intersection of Luxton Street and Coulter Drive.

When the traffic light turned to green, police will allege the two vehicles accelerated rapidly westbound into Southern Cross Drive, reaching speeds of over 110km/h in an 80km/h zone. One vehicle was seen to cut dangerously in front of the other until police stopped both vehicles near Chewings Street in Page.

The driver of the Holden was identified as a 25-year-old male, while the Nissan was driven by a 21-year-old female. Both drivers admitted to racing each other.

Both drivers were subjected to a roadside screening test for alcohol. The 21-year-old female driver, who is a provisional licence holder, later returned a Blood Alcohol Content of 0.123, which is more than six times her permitted level. She will be summonsed on a drink-driving charge.

As empowered under the Road Transport (Safety and Traffic Management) Act 1999, police seized and impounded both vehicles. Under Section 5 of the Act, police may hold the vehicles until legal proceedings are finalised or, if ordered by the Court, for up to 90 days.

3. BizSafe enhancement:

ACT Policing is joining forces with the ACT & Region Chamber of Commerce and Industry and ACT CrimeStoppers in a crime prevention program called BizSafe.

BizSafe aims to diminish the risk of crime against businesses in the ACT by providing information about the types and prevalence of crime specific to that business type and area, provide the knowledge and skills to assess the risks, and implement the most appropriate strategies.

The BizSafe program was first introduced in the ACT in 2008 and was adopted from the Western Australia initiative. The success of this initiative has seen a large number of other jurisdictions across Australia embrace the program.

ACT Policing, in conjunction with its supporting partners, has reinvigorated the content and design of the program, and for the first time incorporated an online version which will be made available via ACT Policing’s website.

The enhanced BizSafe program follows on from the recent “Eyes on the Street” programs, in which businesses, ACTP’s Crime Prevention team and other major stakeholders share information and awareness to minimise suspected criminal activity.

Superintendent Kylie Flower, from ACT Policing’s Crime Prevention team, said the online enhancement of the BizSafe package provided more access, more readily for all key stakeholders. The package provides advice on such diverse topics as Citizen’s Arrest powers, preventing shoplifting, and fraud.

“Information can be a powerful tool in the right hands. The BizSafe fact sheets provide valuable information to assist businesses, which may assist to reduce their exposure to crime,” Supt Flower said.


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52 Responses to Police Wrap – 8 November 2010
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Pork Hunt Pork Hunt 6:00 pm 10 Nov 10

If she is a P plater, then obviously she doesn’t have the experience of three decades on the road on two and four wheels as I do.

In my youth I did drink and drive/ride on many occasions but was extremely fortunate in that I never had a serious accident.

In my view, if you are an inexperienced driver (P plater) and pissed then you are a potential disaster in the making.
As I said, I was lucky, never got sprung, never injured anyone but self and learned from my mistakes.

busgirl busgirl 5:05 pm 10 Nov 10

roflmao said :

“The 21-year-old female driver, who is a provisional licence holder, later returned a Blood Alcohol Content of 0.123, which is more than six times her permitted level.”

I looove how they say provisional driver as if it makes the offence worse, she doesn’t represent all P plate drivers. I’ve seen some serious road rage, and dangerous driving and fully licanced drivers do there fair share. If anything isn’t it worse if a fully licanced driver breaks the road rules?

Do drugs have to do harm to the body long term for them to be illised, or could it be the trans they can put you in, possibly cuasing harm to themselfs and there friends.

Your spelling and grammar…tsk, tsk…a product of the texting age.

p1 p1 4:32 pm 10 Nov 10

roflmao said :

I looove how they say provisional driver as if it makes the offence worse, she doesn’t represent all P plate drivers. I’ve seen some serious road rage, and dangerous driving and fully licanced drivers do there fair share. If anything isn’t it worse if a fully licanced driver breaks the road rules?

To be fair, the fact that she is on “p”s makes a difference with respect to how drunk she was.

roflmao roflmao 4:08 pm 10 Nov 10

“The 21-year-old female driver, who is a provisional licence holder, later returned a Blood Alcohol Content of 0.123, which is more than six times her permitted level.”

I looove how they say provisional driver as if it makes the offence worse, she doesn’t represent all P plate drivers. I’ve seen some serious road rage, and dangerous driving and fully licanced drivers do there fair share. If anything isn’t it worse if a fully licanced driver breaks the road rules?

Do drugs have to do harm to the body long term for them to be illised, or could it be the trans they can put you in, possibly cuasing harm to themselfs and there friends.

p1 p1 10:37 am 10 Nov 10

caf said :

I’ll agree with car crushing for street racers if it’s also done for the typical middle-aged drink driver, too.

Ah, really does raise an interesting question about relative dangers to society doesn’t it? What is worse:

1. Sober, alert, individual concentrating hard on driving their car (which is designed to handle speed – good suspension/brakes/etc) at more then the speed limit on an otherwise empty road.

or

2. Middle aged, drunk, uncaring enough about what they are doing that they are willing to drive while drunk, but doing the speed limit.

I am not saying that either of these is a good thing to be doing, but I do find the different ways they are approached by the justice (and political systems) to be interesting.

Tooks Tooks 9:06 am 10 Nov 10

farnarkler said :

The complete mindf*ck of the Amsterdam coffee shops is that if the police catch you smoking tobacco mixed with your dope, they’ll charge you but if you’re smoking 100% weed, they won’t bother you.

Just smoke 100% weed then!

caf caf 12:04 am 10 Nov 10

I’ll agree with car crushing for street racers if it’s also done for the typical middle-aged drink driver, too.

farnarkler farnarkler 7:04 pm 09 Nov 10

The complete mindf*ck of the Amsterdam coffee shops is that if the police catch you smoking tobacco mixed with your dope, they’ll charge you but if you’re smoking 100% weed, they won’t bother you.

Tooks Tooks 6:55 pm 09 Nov 10

Spartacus said :

Oh and yes, Portugal and Czech have decriminalized all drugs and legalized several of them.

You’ve answered my question – they have not legalised all drugs (because it would not work).

Tooks Tooks 6:52 pm 09 Nov 10

p1 said :

Tooks said :

Not long ago I saw a Mitsubishi Evo (7 I think) pull up at some lights next to a WRX Sti, after both sped and weaved through peak hour traffic to make sure they got to the lights first. They then dragged each other off at the lights and proceeded to weave in and out of traffic at speeds of up to about 140kmh, for about 2-3km, before they went their separate ways at a roundabout. Incredibly dangerous and stupid; I would’ve loved to have seen those two arseclowns lose their cars.

How is it you observed this whole sequence? Were you in the Evo or the WRX?

Just cruising behind in my Maybach.

bigfeet bigfeet 6:43 pm 09 Nov 10

Spartacus said :

Oh and yes, Portugal and Czech have decriminalized all drugs and legalized several of them.

Yes, Czech Republic has decriminalised possession of drugs (up to a certain amount) and Portugal has done likewise, if the person is addicted to drugs.

But in both countries the drugs can be confiscated, the person compelled to take treatment and failure to complete the treatment can result in community service or a fine. That is a long way from legalisation.

There is no country in the world that has legalised drug use, possession or supply… and yes that includes the Netherlands. Contrary to popular opinion it is still illegal to possess and use cannabis in Amsterdam. Even the famous coffee shops are technically illegal, the Dutch just have a policy that they will not enforce those laws under certain circumstances.

I have no real opinion on the social experiment of decriminalisation and harm minimisation strategies. But it is wrong to say that drugs have been legalised in those two or any other countries.

Tooks Tooks 6:41 pm 09 Nov 10

Spartacus said :

Just watched a documentary called “Ecstasy Rising”, very interesting. (youtube it)

I love the reason Ecstasy was originally banned, because it has no proven long term side effects (best study to date that isn’t the retarded “HOLES IN BRAIN!” Government study that has been proven wrong by every independent study ever shows <5% difference in Serotonin between Ecstasy users and non users) and it hurt the DEA's position that all drugs are the spawn of Satan.

Was in Melbourne recently and I see in clubs down there they are handing out pamphlets (with lollypops!) that are basically "We know you do drugs, here is the information you need to do them safely" and it contained a full MSDS on drugs like Marijuana, Ecstasy and GHB. It was quite interesting and good to know that kids down there are getting the appropriate information.

-Government and Police stop mis-information campaign about MDMA, Marijuana, LSD
-Government and Police provide proper, real information on said drugs and how to use them safely.
-Government slowly decriminalizes Marijuana, LSD and MDMA.
-Government slowly legalizes them one by one over a period of time once people learn to respect the drug. (hard drugs are decriminalized, addicts should be treated by doctors, not the courts)

This somewhat in line with you Tooks?

Oh and yes, Portugal and Czech have decriminalized all drugs and legalized several of them.

It’s certainly better thought out than the old “legalise everything” argument. Some good points there, but I’d have to disagree with some of it (don’t have time to go through each point right now though).

Pork Hunt Pork Hunt 6:21 pm 09 Nov 10

Solidarity said :

Tooks said :

Solidarity said :

farnarkler said :

In WA the street racers would be made to watch as their cars are crushed. Pity we don’t have that punishment here.

Why? Bit over the top if you ask me.

Not over the top at all, in my opinion (although I like the idea at #26 better).

Not long ago I saw a Mitsubishi Evo (7 I think) pull up at some lights next to a WRX Sti, after both sped and weaved through peak hour traffic to make sure they got to the lights first. They then dragged each other off at the lights and proceeded to weave in and out of traffic at speeds of up to about 140kmh, for about 2-3km, before they went their separate ways at a roundabout. Incredibly dangerous and stupid; I would’ve loved to have seen those two arseclowns lose their cars.

BTW, the EVO won.

But there is nothing to define what street racing is, what bothers me is that the police could potentially take cars off people who haven’t done anything wrong, for instance accelerating to the speed limit, spinning tyres in wet, stuff like that.

Plus the Commonwealth is destroying assets that do not belong to the Commonwealth.

Perhaps removing registration and automatically striking the VIN number from the RTA Databse (meaning it can’t be reregistered, ever) I would agree with, but the fundamental destruction of property that the Commonwealth has no ownership over irks me.

That’ll work well.
Did you hear about the Lamborghini owner in WA who had his car serviced?
The mechanic took it for a spin and got the thing impounded.
Apparently (at that time, sometime earlier this year) there was no way of appealing the decision (due to the law being a complete ass) so Mr Lambo owner was without his car for 30 days.
Gee, I hope I can never rego my car due to someone elses fuckup…

georgesgenitals georgesgenitals 3:09 pm 09 Nov 10

Tooks said :

georgesgenitals said :

Car crushing is ridiculous. Why aren’t we clearing the title, selling the vehicle and then using the proceeeds to support victims of crime?

Not a bad idea. Having seen some incredibly dangerous street races in this city, I’d be happy to see something like this put in place.

Street racing is incredibly dangerous, and there are plenty of modified cars getting around that are seriously quick pieces of kit. Young driver with no self control coupled with seriously quick vehicle is often a recipe for disaster.

(And that includes the P-Plater who overtook me on a crest between Yass and Murrumbateman the other day doing over 160km/h).

Erg0 Erg0 2:39 pm 09 Nov 10

If drugs were decriminalised then it would be inconsistent to treat them differently to alcohol with respect to the treatment of addicts within the court system. It seems inconsistent to advocate that drugs aren’t dangerous, while still accepting them as a “special” excuse for committing a criminal act.

Spartacus Spartacus 1:49 pm 09 Nov 10

Just watched a documentary called “Ecstasy Rising”, very interesting. (youtube it)

I love the reason Ecstasy was originally banned, because it has no proven long term side effects (best study to date that isn’t the retarded “HOLES IN BRAIN!” Government study that has been proven wrong by every independent study ever shows <5% difference in Serotonin between Ecstasy users and non users) and it hurt the DEA's position that all drugs are the spawn of Satan.

Was in Melbourne recently and I see in clubs down there they are handing out pamphlets (with lollypops!) that are basically "We know you do drugs, here is the information you need to do them safely" and it contained a full MSDS on drugs like Marijuana, Ecstasy and GHB. It was quite interesting and good to know that kids down there are getting the appropriate information.

-Government and Police stop mis-information campaign about MDMA, Marijuana, LSD
-Government and Police provide proper, real information on said drugs and how to use them safely.
-Government slowly decriminalizes Marijuana, LSD and MDMA.
-Government slowly legalizes them one by one over a period of time once people learn to respect the drug. (hard drugs are decriminalized, addicts should be treated by doctors, not the courts)

This somewhat in line with you Tooks?

Oh and yes, Portugal and Czech have decriminalized all drugs and legalized several of them.

p1 p1 1:15 pm 09 Nov 10

Tooks said :

Not long ago I saw a Mitsubishi Evo (7 I think) pull up at some lights next to a WRX Sti, after both sped and weaved through peak hour traffic to make sure they got to the lights first. They then dragged each other off at the lights and proceeded to weave in and out of traffic at speeds of up to about 140kmh, for about 2-3km, before they went their separate ways at a roundabout. Incredibly dangerous and stupid; I would’ve loved to have seen those two arseclowns lose their cars.

How is it you observed this whole sequence? Were you in the Evo or the WRX?

Solidarity Solidarity 12:17 pm 09 Nov 10

Tooks said :

Solidarity said :

farnarkler said :

In WA the street racers would be made to watch as their cars are crushed. Pity we don’t have that punishment here.

Why? Bit over the top if you ask me.

Not over the top at all, in my opinion (although I like the idea at #26 better).

Not long ago I saw a Mitsubishi Evo (7 I think) pull up at some lights next to a WRX Sti, after both sped and weaved through peak hour traffic to make sure they got to the lights first. They then dragged each other off at the lights and proceeded to weave in and out of traffic at speeds of up to about 140kmh, for about 2-3km, before they went their separate ways at a roundabout. Incredibly dangerous and stupid; I would’ve loved to have seen those two arseclowns lose their cars.

BTW, the EVO won.

But there is nothing to define what street racing is, what bothers me is that the police could potentially take cars off people who haven’t done anything wrong, for instance accelerating to the speed limit, spinning tyres in wet, stuff like that.

Plus the Commonwealth is destroying assets that do not belong to the Commonwealth.

Perhaps removing registration and automatically striking the VIN number from the RTA Databse (meaning it can’t be reregistered, ever) I would agree with, but the fundamental destruction of property that the Commonwealth has no ownership over irks me.

Jungle Jim Jungle Jim 11:42 am 09 Nov 10

Skid – I absolutely love that scene. The expressions Burns goes through while hearing his car is gone to the eager anticipation that the call could be about his cube gets me every time! Kudos.

georgesgenitals georgesgenitals 11:39 am 09 Nov 10

Solidarity said :

Well, if you can crush a car for street racing, why don’t they lop the balls off rapists or take the lives of murderers?

Depends on whether we can sell the balls, I guess…

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