Skip to content Skip to main navigation

Opinion

Expert strata, facilities & building management services

Propaganda radicalised us, then and now

By John Hargreaves - 10 May 2016 12

nashos nasho medal

I was reflecting on the Anzac Day stuff the other week and I confess to some disquiet.

This is when we commemorate the sacrifices of our young men and women in theatres of war in defence of Oz and our way of life.

Let me get this straight though, we sent young men and women overseas to fight in some else’s war because the Gummnt said so.

In the Great War, we actually sent volunteers to the Middle East and Europe to die for a cause. And that cause was?

We are currently sending troops overseas to fight for territory which is not ours, never was ours and against an enemy which is bent on world domination. Really?

Hmmm. Let me also get this straight. It is illegal for a young man or woman to go overseas to fight against the same regime our soldiers, sailors and airpeople are fighting against.

How’d that go in the Boer War, where volunteers from Australia (or more correctly, the colonies) went overseas to fight the oppressive Boers and maintain the “Empire”?

Whilst conscription didn’t get up for the Great War, it was not illegal for Australian citizens to go and fight, so long as it was not against the Aussies or Brits and mates.

It was not illegal for French-Australians to go overseas and fight with the French Resistance or Italian Australians to fight with the Italian Partisans.

It has only been illegal for people to go overseas and fight where they fight against our own troops. I guess that’s because our all seeing, all knowing Gummnt knows best.

But it is now illegal for Australians to go to Syria to fight against a regime which is murderous, yet it was not illegal for people to join the Anti- Saddam Hussein rebels, or the Anti-Gaddafi rebels.

There seems to be a contradiction here, perhaps.

We say that radicalised young men should not be allowed to leave the country to defend another country against an oppressive regime. How did these people get radicalised? By propaganda that’s how. By the intentional tapping into the insecurities of the young mind, to tap into the risk attracted young men, anxious for adventure and glory, having been brought up on the diet of violence and pro-Western ideology.

I was radicalised as a young man. I was told that the communists were at our doorstep and that a forward defence policy to stem the tide of the yellow peril advance down the Indo-Chinese Peninsula, domino fashion was essential.

I was convinced that if I were to be a true Australian, I would go into the Army and face the enemy. And so I did. I volunteered for nasho.

I would have happily gone to Vietnam, and tried to get posted there. I would happily have taken up arms and shot someone to protect my family and my country.

Boy, was I wrong. Only later, after much research and talking to folks who did go, did I realise the enormous lie which had been perpetrated upon me. But I was indeed radicalised and would brook no counter to my view on the imminent danger.

A letter from Richard Manderson in the Times on Anzac Day prompted me to think of this perspective.

He said that “the young men who are so easily conscripted into the horrific cause of Islamic State are perhaps not so extraordinary. They are not the first young men, full of bravado and testosterone, hungry for adventure and respect, sometimes with chips on their shoulder, to sign up for doubtful causes, about which they may know very little.”

The first that I know of were the Boer War soldiers. This continues until the current day, I know cos I was one of them.

 

What’s Your opinion?


Post a comment
Please login to post your comments, or connect with
12 Responses to
Propaganda radicalised us, then and now
Ello Vera 4:55 pm 13 May 16

dungfungus said :

The fatal flaw in your theory is that the current crop of “radicalised by propaganda” (your words, not mine) young men who go to fight for ISIS in Syria are opposed to Western values and the skills they acquire there in how to kill infidels may be used against us when they return.
This was not the case with all the other cases of impressionable young Australians going to other campaigns that you mention.

Dunno about that. One troop ship returning from the Great War to the port of Fremantle happened to dock in the middle of a police action against strikers. They promptly joined the workers and, using the skills they had acquired in the war, gave the cops a good flogging. The Mayor did a Bligh and hid in his office, IIRC.

dungfungus 3:18 pm 12 May 16

gazket said :

JessP said :

John Hargreaves said:

“I was radicalised as a young man. I was told that the communists were at our doorstep and that a forward defence policy to stem the tide of the yellow peril advance down the Indo-Chinese Peninsula, domino fashion was essential.

I was convinced that if I were to be a true Australian, I would go into the Army and face the enemy. And so I did. I volunteered for nasho”

Really John? And did the other young men in your outfit also sign up to kill or be killed for their belief in the domino theory?

I find this difficult to believe. In order to be ‘radicalised’ you must have missed all the anti -war demonstrations and general cynicism about the war across the nation, particularly from your generation. But you never questioned it? Didn’t you wonder what all the fuss was about?

And your quote at the end equating joining the Australian army with joining Islamic State plumbs new depths, which may be why you used someone else’s voice to say it.

Frunkensteen said :

….this society that we live in rejects (or should reject) the values that fundamentalist islam adheres to.
All value-sets are not equal. We have ours, they have theirs. Theirs are wrong.

I realise this is a shocking thing to say in the eyes of those who’ve been conned by 40-odd years of post-modern cultural relativism, but there it is.

Greetings, fellow dinosaur.

Justin, I did not miss some of the demos re the Vietnam War but need to say that the vehemence expressed in those demos was acutely felt interstate and not much here in 1968 or 1969. I was overseas with my RAAF father in the first half of 1968 and in boarding school in country Victoria in 1967, and prior to that I was 12 months at RAAF Butterworth in Malaysia.

This was the time of the Confrontation between Malaysia and Indonesia and the domino theory was alive and well. Indeed, the threat of communism to Malaysia was a key media event.

So, no, I didn’t feel the protests as much as others, I believed the rubbish put out by the government and by my father’s associates in the services. As a young bloke, I didn’t delve deeply into the validity of the propaganda, I trusted my elders. And I didn’t wonder what the fuss was all about. I took a different stand to my friends, convinced, then, that they were wrong. But I was and I was brain washed into believing that stuff.

There were no other ‘volunteers’ in my platoon in the Army, but I did meet a bunch of ‘regulars’ when I went to my units. They were professional soldiers and did what the government of the day asked of them.

I think Manderson got it right and I don’t accept that my reference to his article was new depths and I did quote the author, so your problem is? I didn’t hide behind anonymity. You can check it if you want.

That aside John, did you still want to kill the enemy when you returned to “civvie street or did you become a closet communist?”

John Hargreaves 11:11 am 12 May 16

JessP said :

John Hargreaves said:

“I was radicalised as a young man. I was told that the communists were at our doorstep and that a forward defence policy to stem the tide of the yellow peril advance down the Indo-Chinese Peninsula, domino fashion was essential.

I was convinced that if I were to be a true Australian, I would go into the Army and face the enemy. And so I did. I volunteered for nasho”

Really John? And did the other young men in your outfit also sign up to kill or be killed for their belief in the domino theory?

I find this difficult to believe. In order to be ‘radicalised’ you must have missed all the anti -war demonstrations and general cynicism about the war across the nation, particularly from your generation. But you never questioned it? Didn’t you wonder what all the fuss was about?

And your quote at the end equating joining the Australian army with joining Islamic State plumbs new depths, which may be why you used someone else’s voice to say it.

Frunkensteen said :

….this society that we live in rejects (or should reject) the values that fundamentalist islam adheres to.
All value-sets are not equal. We have ours, they have theirs. Theirs are wrong.

I realise this is a shocking thing to say in the eyes of those who’ve been conned by 40-odd years of post-modern cultural relativism, but there it is.

Greetings, fellow dinosaur.

Justin, I did not miss some of the demos re the Vietnam War but need to say that the vehemence expressed in those demos was acutely felt interstate and not much here in 1968 or 1969. I was overseas with my RAAF father in the first half of 1968 and in boarding school in country Victoria in 1967, and prior to that I was 12 months at RAAF Butterworth in Malaysia.

This was the time of the Confrontation between Malaysia and Indonesia and the domino theory was alive and well. Indeed, the threat of communism to Malaysia was a key media event.

So, no, I didn’t feel the protests as much as others, I believed the rubbish put out by the government and by my father’s associates in the services. As a young bloke, I didn’t delve deeply into the validity of the propaganda, I trusted my elders. And I didn’t wonder what the fuss was all about. I took a different stand to my friends, convinced, then, that they were wrong. But I was and I was brain washed into believing that stuff.

There were no other ‘volunteers’ in my platoon in the Army, but I did meet a bunch of ‘regulars’ when I went to my units. They were professional soldiers and did what the government of the day asked of them.

I think Manderson got it right and I don’t accept that my reference to his article was new depths and I did quote the author, so your problem is? I didn’t hide behind anonymity. You can check it if you want.

justin heywood 4:17 am 12 May 16

John Hargreaves said:

“I was radicalised as a young man. I was told that the communists were at our doorstep and that a forward defence policy to stem the tide of the yellow peril advance down the Indo-Chinese Peninsula, domino fashion was essential.

I was convinced that if I were to be a true Australian, I would go into the Army and face the enemy. And so I did. I volunteered for nasho”

Really John? And did the other young men in your outfit also sign up to kill or be killed for their belief in the domino theory?

I find this difficult to believe. In order to be ‘radicalised’ you must have missed all the anti -war demonstrations and general cynicism about the war across the nation, particularly from your generation. But you never questioned it? Didn’t you wonder what all the fuss was about?

And your quote at the end equating joining the Australian army with joining Islamic State plumbs new depths, which may be why you used someone else’s voice to say it.

Frunkensteen said :

….this society that we live in rejects (or should reject) the values that fundamentalist islam adheres to.
All value-sets are not equal. We have ours, they have theirs. Theirs are wrong.

I realise this is a shocking thing to say in the eyes of those who’ve been conned by 40-odd years of post-modern cultural relativism, but there it is.

Greetings, fellow dinosaur.

dungfungus 5:24 pm 11 May 16

dungfungus said :

Maya123 said :

Mysteryman said :

“This was not the case with all the other cases of impressionable young Australians going to other campaigns that you mention.”

And where do you think the bike gangs came from?
Look at post WWII history. Young men, trained in warfare, used to relying on their ‘brothers’ for survival and surviving in lawless conditions.
No, obviously not the case before.

What “bike gangs” are you talking about?

He’s talking about 1950s Californian motorcycle club cultural history.

Some people confuse US culture for everywhere’s culture.

dungfungus said :

The fatal flaw in your theory is that the current crop of “radicalised by propaganda” (your words, not mine) young men who go to fight for ISIS in Syria are opposed to Western values and the skills they acquire there in how to kill infidels may be used against us when they return.
This was not the case with all the other cases of impressionable young Australians going to other campaigns that you mention.

Oh, of course, the Unicorns.
Yes, I understand now.

HenryBG 4:46 pm 11 May 16

dungfungus said :

Maya123 said :

Mysteryman said :

“This was not the case with all the other cases of impressionable young Australians going to other campaigns that you mention.”

And where do you think the bike gangs came from?
Look at post WWII history. Young men, trained in warfare, used to relying on their ‘brothers’ for survival and surviving in lawless conditions.
No, obviously not the case before.

What “bike gangs” are you talking about?

He’s talking about 1950s Californian motorcycle club cultural history.

Some people confuse US culture for everywhere’s culture.

Anybody interested in this would really enjoy this:
http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/10882.Hell_s_Angels

I’m not even faintly interested in motorcycle clubs, and I loved it.
It is one of US literature’s pearls, head and shoulders above most of the other rubbish published over there post-war. I found it far more engaging than boring Kerouac, and far less dated than Norman Mailer or Wolfe, who got so lost in the minutiae of the day they wrote stuff that no longer has meaning for us. As for the gibberish from Pynchon, Heller and Vonnegut…

HenryBG 4:08 pm 11 May 16

Maya123 said :

Mysteryman said :

“This was not the case with all the other cases of impressionable young Australians going to other campaigns that you mention.”

And where do you think the bike gangs came from?
Look at post WWII history. Young men, trained in warfare, used to relying on their ‘brothers’ for survival and surviving in lawless conditions.
No, obviously not the case before.

What “bike gangs” are you talking about?

He’s talking about 1950s Californian motorcycle club cultural history.

Some people confuse US culture for everywhere’s culture.

Southmouth 4:04 pm 11 May 16

Mysteryman said :

“This was not the case with all the other cases of impressionable young Australians going to other campaigns that you mention.”

And where do you think the bike gangs came from?

Immigration mostly. Not the ADF.

dungfungus 9:20 am 11 May 16

Mysteryman said :

“This was not the case with all the other cases of impressionable young Australians going to other campaigns that you mention.”

And where do you think the bike gangs came from?
Look at post WWII history. Young men, trained in warfare, used to relying on their ‘brothers’ for survival and surviving in lawless conditions.
No, obviously not the case before.

What “bike gangs” are you talking about?

Frunkensteen 9:55 pm 10 May 16

“This was not the case with all the other cases of impressionable young Australians going to other campaigns that you mention.”

And where do you think the bike gangs came from?
Look at post WWII history. Young men, trained in warfare, used to relying on their ‘brothers’ for survival and surviving in lawless conditions.
No, obviously not the case before.

HenryBG 2:03 pm 10 May 16

“Only later, … did I realise the enormous lie which had been perpetrated upon me.”

Wha…? You realised that the communists were kind decent people?

“They are not the first young men, full of bravado and testosterone, hungry for adventure and respect, sometimes with chips on their shoulder, to sign up for doubtful causes, about which they may know very little”

Sure. But this society that we live in rejects (or should reject) the values that fundamentalist islam adheres to.
All value-sets are not equal. We have ours, they have theirs. Theirs are wrong.

I realise this is a shocking thing to say in the eyes of those who’ve been conned by 40-odd years of post-modern cultural relativism, but there it is.

dungfungus 9:45 am 10 May 16

The fatal flaw in your theory is that the current crop of “radicalised by propaganda” (your words, not mine) young men who go to fight for ISIS in Syria are opposed to Western values and the skills they acquire there in how to kill infidels may be used against us when they return.
This was not the case with all the other cases of impressionable young Australians going to other campaigns that you mention.

Related Articles

CBR Tweets

Sign up to our newsletter

Top
Copyright © 2017 Riot ACT Holdings Pty Ltd. All rights reserved.
www.the-riotact.com | www.b2bmagazine.com.au | www.thisiscanberra.com

Search across the site