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Quality road resurfacing in Gordon.

By GordonResidential 8 November 2011 36

claire dennis avenue

Claire Dennis Ave in Gordon was the proud recipient of this high quality work, today 7 November 2011.

A sample of the work, proudly undertaken by a contractor engaged by the ACT Government.   Stones are totally detaching from the pavement in less than half a day.

http://photobucket.com/claire-dennis-road

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Quality road resurfacing in Gordon.
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Paul0075 12:44 pm 11 Dec 11

My now retired uncle used to work for Main Roads in Queensland and explained the shiny patches some of the posters are referring to is generally not from the gravel in the bitumen seal being worn away, but being sunk into the tar under it.

As the bitumen heats up the tar used becomes soft, and if there’s already a few layers under it, the gravel used in the bitumen starts to sink into the tar, from being pushed down by passing vehicles.

The bitumen (chip seal) is used on the majority of Australian roads, and as much as I prefer the asphalt surface, it’s just a fact of life that budgets don’t always stretch to have asphalt re-laid when roads wear, crack or lose their traction properties. And no I don’t work for the government or it’s contractors.

miz 10:13 am 04 Dec 11

Agree with Miss Sookie. Part of my street was ‘re-sealed’ (scoff) with this rubbish recently, for no apparent reason, and to my complete annoyance. I wish they would do a pothole audit instead.

However, the roads people have done a nice smooth patch job on Erindale Drive and the Isabella Drive roundabout. I guess those were done with the real deal, not just tossing a few stones about.

GordonResidential 7:12 pm 03 Dec 11

bearlikesbeer said :

This form of resurfacing not only leaves the gutters full of stones that are never properly cleaned up, it also seems to spread a lot of tar around compared to the older method.

For many days after my street was last resurfaced, car tyres were still picking up tar from the roads, resulting in stains to concrete and paved driveways. The neighbours and I had to make dozens of calls to get the contractor out to inspect the road, and have a go at cleaning the marks from our driveways with chemicals and high pressure hoses.

We all had a whinge to the contractor about the poor quality of the surface, and how tight the ACT govt is. The contractor told us this method was preferred by the govt because it’s a more environmentally friendly method than the traditional “hot mix”. No idea whether that’s really true.

Interesting. Thanks.

GordonResidential 7:10 pm 03 Dec 11

JC said :

enrique said :

Welcome to road re-surfacing ACT style!

This method has been used here in Canberra for many years, presumbably due to its ‘cost effective’ properties. In other words – it’s cheap – unfortunately that word is usually paired with ‘nasty’ and on these types of road jobs that is certainly the case.

You may still get another layer of tar sprayed on top if you’re lucky but it’s doubtful. Seen many of these type of jobs over the years to suspect you’ll be stuck with dodgy loose gravel for a few weeks/months until the local traffic tyres roll it in and/or the street sweepers clean up the leftovers.

Self-government, fantastic! There was once a time when the hot mix roads of Canberra were the envy of the nation – alas, never again.

Hate to burst your bubble pettal, but chip sealing was used in Canberra well before self government. I recall the road where I lived in Macgregor got sealed when I was in primary school, so before 1984. And never is another layer sprayed on top. The whole idea is tar is sprayed to seal the road and then the chips are added to give grip to the surface. Without the chips the road would be slippery.

As to those complaining about it, may I ask what you want to give up to be able to afford the luxury of resurfacing with hot mix? I beleive the cost of chip is about 1/3rd the cost of a hotmix reseal.

Also the reason why this method is used here in Canberra (and other rural cities) more than say Sydney is our traffic volumes are so low that even after 10 years the surface is still generally good, however the surface is opening up and becomes slightly porus. So they spray the tar to seal the old surface and chip for grip. In places like Sydney the traffic, heavy vehicles in particular will destroy the road after 10 years, so of course the only way to fix is to rip it up and add hot mix.

A good analogy is a timber deck. When the paint starts to flake do you repair and repaint or replace the whole lot? I know most, depending upon how damaged the wood is would repaint, same too with the roads.

Your point?

Don’t work for gummint, do you?

Lots of airmchair expertise there. And obvious points. Cheap repair? Yes. Worth it in the long run?

Let we residents decide.

GordonResidential 7:06 pm 03 Dec 11

M0les said :

I can’t see anything wrong in the picure, this resurfacing is just not yet complete: The drains are still plugged to prevent the loose gravel from running-off. At some time in the future, when the most gravel has embedded in the underlying tar, the loose surface will be removed. I’ve seen this many times before and the end-result’s quite workable and doesn’t throw-up many stones.

However I _would_ be worried if there are no warning signs of a loose surface and if it carries-on for too long.

Definitely finished. Swept next day.

JC 9:33 pm 14 Nov 11
Gungahlin Al 9:25 am 11 Nov 11

JC said :

Hate to burst your bubble pettal, but chip sealing was used in Canberra well before self government. I recall the road where I lived in Macgregor got sealed when I was in primary school, so before 1984. And never is another layer sprayed on top. The whole idea is tar is sprayed to seal the road and then the chips are added to give grip to the surface. Without the chips the road would be slippery.

As to those complaining about it, may I ask what you want to give up to be able to afford the luxury of resurfacing with hot mix? I beleive the cost of chip is about 1/3rd the cost of a hotmix reseal.

Also the reason why this method is used here in Canberra (and other rural cities) more than say Sydney is our traffic volumes are so low that even after 10 years the surface is still generally good, however the surface is opening up and becomes slightly porus. So they spray the tar to seal the old surface and chip for grip. In places like Sydney the traffic, heavy vehicles in particular will destroy the road after 10 years, so of course the only way to fix is to rip it up and add hot mix.

A good analogy is a timber deck. When the paint starts to flake do you repair and repaint or replace the whole lot? I know most, depending upon how damaged the wood is would repaint, same too with the roads.

It was only a matter of time before chip-seal’s lone defender chimed in to support the Roads ACT.

dpm 8:45 am 11 Nov 11

JC said :

…. The whole idea is tar is sprayed to seal the road and then the chips are added to give grip to the surface. Without the chips the road would be slippery…

As I said earlier in this post, go for a drive on the parkway. There’s vast sections where the ‘slippery’ bit is in the wheeltracks of where cars actually touch the road (as that is where all the stones got spat out from). The rest of the road is ‘resurfaced’ nicely.
So, using your details, we can say that the parkway is now ‘slippery’ in the wheeltracks due to the resurfacing efforts? It’s probably OK in subrurbs, but is not great on 100km stretched of road when it rains, IMO….
Also, it’s not great for cyclists as when they have redone a major road a few times (over the years), the road surface ends up a couple of inches above the gutter bottom – making a double-sided gutter on an 80km road which is kinda dangerous on a bike! Streeton Drive (at the end near Cotter Rd) was like this for many years until the redid it with proper hotmix this year (is that what it’s called?). That stuff is great! Cheers.

Fletch74 11:29 pm 10 Nov 11

Why resurface a perfectly fine road? Now its just a mess rocks everywhere tar everywhere thanks very much

JC 2:33 pm 09 Nov 11

enrique said :

Welcome to road re-surfacing ACT style!

This method has been used here in Canberra for many years, presumbably due to its ‘cost effective’ properties. In other words – it’s cheap – unfortunately that word is usually paired with ‘nasty’ and on these types of road jobs that is certainly the case.

You may still get another layer of tar sprayed on top if you’re lucky but it’s doubtful. Seen many of these type of jobs over the years to suspect you’ll be stuck with dodgy loose gravel for a few weeks/months until the local traffic tyres roll it in and/or the street sweepers clean up the leftovers.

Self-government, fantastic! There was once a time when the hot mix roads of Canberra were the envy of the nation – alas, never again.

Hate to burst your bubble pettal, but chip sealing was used in Canberra well before self government. I recall the road where I lived in Macgregor got sealed when I was in primary school, so before 1984. And never is another layer sprayed on top. The whole idea is tar is sprayed to seal the road and then the chips are added to give grip to the surface. Without the chips the road would be slippery.

As to those complaining about it, may I ask what you want to give up to be able to afford the luxury of resurfacing with hot mix? I beleive the cost of chip is about 1/3rd the cost of a hotmix reseal.

Also the reason why this method is used here in Canberra (and other rural cities) more than say Sydney is our traffic volumes are so low that even after 10 years the surface is still generally good, however the surface is opening up and becomes slightly porus. So they spray the tar to seal the old surface and chip for grip. In places like Sydney the traffic, heavy vehicles in particular will destroy the road after 10 years, so of course the only way to fix is to rip it up and add hot mix.

A good analogy is a timber deck. When the paint starts to flake do you repair and repaint or replace the whole lot? I know most, depending upon how damaged the wood is would repaint, same too with the roads.

Ryan 8:17 pm 08 Nov 11

DUB said :

.
What every one should complain about is really dodgy, quick-fix patch work carried out on Athllon Drive and Yarra Glen Drive.Disgusting!!!

Yarra Glen* (no ‘Drive’)

krats 4:32 pm 08 Nov 11

Its Only The First Coat…Like Paint You Need 3 Or 4 Before It Looks Any Good.

creative_canberran 3:27 pm 08 Nov 11

misssookie said :

I can’t understand why the Gordon neighbourhood roads are being resealed. Most of them are in great condition. It’s a huge inconvenience for drivers and likely part of some nonsensical roadworks schedule where you get the “upgrade” whether you need it or not. Perhaps I’m just cross because my car windscreen cracked on Saturday as the result of a stonechip…

They would have done better to use the money from these “upgrades” to do a proper job on Drakeford Dr. They’ve sealed little patches all over the place but not bothered to just lay a new surface. All they’ve done is make it bumpier, with the exception of the roundabout which was done properly.

Thoroughly Smashed 3:16 pm 08 Nov 11

harvyk1 said :

Yeah this is about the quality of the work which is done on suburban streets. Expect to get a few extra chip marks and don’t be overly surprised if your brakes need replacing in the next few months after a stone gets lodged in your brakes…

If a stone gets lodged in your brakes they were in pretty poor condition to start with.

bearlikesbeer 1:44 pm 08 Nov 11

This form of resurfacing not only leaves the gutters full of stones that are never properly cleaned up, it also seems to spread a lot of tar around compared to the older method.

For many days after my street was last resurfaced, car tyres were still picking up tar from the roads, resulting in stains to concrete and paved driveways. The neighbours and I had to make dozens of calls to get the contractor out to inspect the road, and have a go at cleaning the marks from our driveways with chemicals and high pressure hoses.

We all had a whinge to the contractor about the poor quality of the surface, and how tight the ACT govt is. The contractor told us this method was preferred by the govt because it’s a more environmentally friendly method than the traditional “hot mix”. No idea whether that’s really true.

misssookie 12:50 pm 08 Nov 11

I can’t understand why the Gordon neighbourhood roads are being resealed. Most of them are in great condition. It’s a huge inconvenience for drivers and likely part of some nonsensical roadworks schedule where you get the “upgrade” whether you need it or not. Perhaps I’m just cross because my car windscreen cracked on Saturday as the result of a stonechip…

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