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Reclaim the Night – Friday October 29, 6 – 9.30pm

By Reclaim The Night - 23 October 2010 40

[First filed: Oct 22, 2010 @ 8:26]

reclaim the night

JOIN IN SOLIDARITY FOR WOMEN TO LIVE WITHOUT THE FEAR AND REALITY OF RAPE AND VIOLENCE

WHAT IS RECLAIM THE NIGHT?

‘Reclaim The Night’ is a chance for women to walk in solidarity and demand the right to live without fear and reality of rape and violence. We demand the right to use public space without fear. We demand this right as a civil liberty; we demand this as a human right.

ABOUT RECLAIM THE NIGHT CANBERRA 2010

This year’s Reclaim The Night will commence in Glebe Park with guest speakers and belly dancers, followed by the march to Garema Place where participants will be encouraged to stay on and enjoy live music, dancing, markets stalls from Handmade Canberra, food & drinks and roving street performers.

We are proud that the speakers, musicians, artisans and performers that are contributing their time and energy to Reclaim The night are all inspirational young women from around the ACT. More details about performances, speeches and activities at Reclaim The Night 2010 will be released here soon.

YOUNG PEOPLE AND RECLAIM THE NIGHT

This year, the theme for Reclaim The Night is Young People. Sexual violence and public safety are significant and pertinent issues for Canberra’s young communities. The highest incidences of rape and violence occur against young women aged 10 to 19 years; five times more than the general population (ABS 2010).

The “State of Australia’s Young People” report (2009) also found that 1 in 3 young people reported experiencing unwanted sex, 25% fet unsafe walking alone at night, and that young people are more likely to be the victims of crime.

HOW CAN MEN SUPPORT RECLAIM THE NIGHT?

Reclaim The Night recognises the valuable contribution that men can make in championing this cause. Men can show their support by challenging male attitudes that support violence against women in their day to day lives and by participating in the march from the back.

Marching from the back is important because it shows men’s support, while providing women with the space to unite together and exercise their right to move freely without protection from men.

A BRIEF HISTORY OF RECLAIM THE NIGHT

    • 1976: 10,000 women and children marched through the streets as a reaction to around 16,000 reported rapes that year

    • 1977: Women marched in protest of the police warning that women should not go out at night because of the ‘Ripper’ murders. Women took to the streets to demand “the right to move freely in their communities at day and night without harassment and sexual assault”

    • 1978: Women in Sydney and Melbourne joined women around the world, marching for their right to safety

    • 2010: Today, we walk for the same reasons… because sexual violence affects one in five Australian women.

RSVP on Facebook, check out our website or contact admin@wchm.org.au or 62902166

What’s Your opinion?


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40 Responses to
Reclaim the Night – Friday October 29, 6 – 9.30pm
rosebud 4:50 pm 22 Oct 10

You’re not safe anywhere, anytime if you fear being attacked by magpies. I was tentatively reclaiming my own little space in the north of Canberra last night when I was attacked by a testosterone driven magpie. The worst part is that I had waited to go for my walk until it was near to dark. But it made no difference at all. Reclaim THAT!

Solidarity 4:39 pm 22 Oct 10

I-filed said :

How about we all also reclaim our sexuality away from the likes of the “Eros” Association, promoting degrading porn as healthy sex. Canberran Melinda Tankard Reist has it right on the ABC’s The Drum:

http://www.abc.net.au/unleashed/40310.html

Pffft, it’s entertainment. Don’t like it, don’t go.

I-filed 3:57 pm 22 Oct 10

How about we all also reclaim our sexuality away from the likes of the “Eros” Association, promoting degrading porn as healthy sex. Canberran Melinda Tankard Reist has it right on the ABC’s The Drum:

http://www.abc.net.au/unleashed/40310.html

Muffyk 3:44 pm 22 Oct 10

Ahh, indeed… the last line. Way to nit-pick! Even if you took those nine words away, the issues associated with Reclaim the Night would still hold true.

And now that I re-read Woody’s statement – I’m not sure why it’s necessary to point out that 1 in 3 women have only experienced one incident of violence… in my opinion, one time is too many.

And in relation to whether you are more likely to be assaulted in a private or public space… this isn’t about understanding how statistically likely it is that you might be sexually assaulted in public – it’s about the fact that it still happens, and it is not acceptable.

Tetranitrate 3:12 pm 22 Oct 10

Muffyk said :

I’m not really sure what you are on about Woody. I don’t see the 1 in 5 statistic quoted anywhere in the event posting.

Try at the bottom of the “A BRIEF HISTORY OF RECLAIM THE NIGHT” section, line beginning with 2010.

Muffyk 2:58 pm 22 Oct 10

I’m not really sure what you are on about Woody. I don’t see the 1 in 5 statistic quoted anywhere in the event posting.

And a battle of semantics in relation to defining violence against women, sexual assault, sexual crime, sexual violence etc., well, it’s not really the point of this event now, is it? This event is about women reclaiming public spaces where sexual and/or violent crimes against women do occur, and where women in general feel unsafe.

@astrojax – You may have a point. I’m not sure women have ever experienced freedom and safety at night. But surely it’s a nice ideal that we can all work towards?

p1 2:48 pm 22 Oct 10

astrojax said :

while i applaud the sentiment and cause here, i always baulk at the ‘reclaim’ bit – like, when exactly did women ever have freedom and safety at night? and when / how did they lose it? serious question – happy to be informed

Under the rule of the Taliban women were pretty safe. So long as they kept the burka done up properly, and didn’t break any of the rules (like going out without a male relative, driving a car, or listening to music).

I am very supportive of this, however often find the statistics infuriating. Not because I think they exaggerate the occurrences of these offences, but because they are presented in very dubious ways, without references, without defining terms and generally I feel that takes away from the impact.

astrojax 2:25 pm 22 Oct 10

while i applaud the sentiment and cause here, i always baulk at the ‘reclaim’ bit – like, when exactly did women ever have freedom and safety at night? and when / how did they lose it? serious question – happy to be informed

but ‘claim’ the night – all for that!

🙂

Woody Mann-Caruso 2:25 pm 22 Oct 10

sexual violence affects one in five Australian women

Do we have a cite for this? What’s ‘sexual violence’? What does ‘affect’ mean?

The sixth national Australian Bureau of Statistics household survey of crime and safety gives a ‘victim prevalence rate’ (VPR) for sexual assuault of just 0.3% for all adult Australians. Regular assaults vary by state/territory but run around the 5% mark, and half of those are for men. If we expand our coverage to ‘an incident of violence in the past 12 months’, the most recent stats I could find at the ABS (1996) gave a VPR of 7.1% – 1 in 14, not even close to 1 in 5.

If the source is the ABS’ 2006 Personal Safety Survey (and it seems to be a popular cite for similar initiatives , then the stats are more like:

– nearly one in five Australian women have experienced violence by a current or a previous partner _at some point in their lives_ – if this is the stat you’re relying on, then the words ‘are affected’ and ‘sexual crime’ are being used very, very loosely indeed
– for 1 in 3 of these women, this was a single incident
– sexual violence accounted for only 1/5th of this violence – so more like 1 in 25, unless you want to say ‘if a man hits you, it’s a sexual crime’; and
– you are much, much, much more likely to be sexually assaulted by your current or ex-partner partner in your home or his, not some random thug on the street, and definitely not in a ‘public space’.

This is a serious and insidious issue. It deserves proper statistical treatment, not grossly inaccurate soundbytes.

Jim Jones 2:06 pm 22 Oct 10

Mr Gillespie said :

NEWS FLASH!!!!!

Men get raped and are subjected to violent attacks, too.

Animals too … and blow-up dolls!!!

colourful sydney rac 1:44 pm 22 Oct 10

Mr Gillespie said :

NEWS FLASH!!!!!

Men get raped and are subjected to violent attacks, too.

I trust you have pommy bastards contact details, you can join his opressed males against the wicked femocracy movement.

Seriously – why did you post that?

johnboy 1:16 pm 22 Oct 10

Well men are welcome to march too.

Mr Gillespie 12:09 pm 22 Oct 10

NEWS FLASH!!!!!

Men get raped and are subjected to violent attacks, too.

Sgt.Bungers 10:51 am 22 Oct 10

As long as nobody gets out the ol’ mamory glands, or they’ll cause earth quakes.

But I agree. In the civilised society we like to think we live in, both men and women should be equally scared of venturing out into dodgy parts of Canberra at night…

Both Men and Women should not walk down the street with their headphones in for fear of not being able to hear an approaching attacker…

Neither Women or Men should dress provocatively, as those in society who are more closely related to angry baboons than we care to talk about, cannot be expected to control themselves… and by dressing nicely in this day and age, anyone is really just asking to be molested.

In all seriousness though, it is an absolute disgrace that there are still elected officials who as recently as a few years ago have come out with quotes along the lines of, women should not dress provocatively as men can’t be expected to control themselves. As a male I find that offensive. It should be reasonable to expect that in this day and age the vast majority of my male peers posess more sexual control than that of a horny neanderthal.

Solidarity 10:17 am 22 Oct 10

Why do I get singled out to participate in some girl march, I wanna do something cool like participate in driving an Indy car or something

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