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RiotACT Face Off: Light Rail or Bullet Train

By Canfan 11 August 2014 35

train-stock

Talk of a bullet train between Canberra and Sydney has been bubbling away for some time now. How do these plans compare to light rail and which is more important to Canberra? We asked Damien Haas (Chair of ACT Light Rail) and Tim Bohm (President, Bullet Train for Australia Party) the following question and their answers are below.

Given the current financial climate, are our municipal funds better spent on light rail or a bullet train?

Damien Haas
Chair of ACT Light Rail

damien-haas-picture

Comparing the two is the classic apples to oranges cliché, as they are very different transport solutions with little in common aside from rails. However, that is what Riot Act has requested.

For the short and long term benefit of the ACT ratepayer, it is better to build Capital Metro from Gungahlin to Civic, and eventually across Canberra, than a bullet train.

Planning and engineering studies for light rail are well underway. Construction costs can be estimated, as building light rail is a standard and routine engineering task in Australia. Aside from conceptual feasibility studies, no similar work has been performed for bullet trains. If it was ever built, it may never come here, instead running directly between Melbourne and Sydney.

Investing in light rail is not the challenge many believe. The ACT will receive 4.4 billion dollars this year from the Federal government, an amount rising incrementally every year. In this context a public transport investment of 600 million over 4 years is fiscally prudent and a sound long-term investment in a growing city.

Light rail has strong electoral support, with the parties taking it to the 2012 Assembly election forming government. Individuals campaigning for bullet trains attracted a handful of votes, as bullet trains provide few clear benefits. Regular polling conducted since consistently shows a majority of Canberrans supporting light rail. Canberrans understand the short and long term benefits.

The use of public money for any project requires careful consideration using triple bottom line analysis – economic, environmental and societal. In each area Capital Metro delivers immediate and long-term benefits to Canberra, that bullet trains can’t match.

Light rail will provide direct economic benefit in the ACT enhancing productivity, freeing families from needing a second car and allowing parking space to be better used. Increased patronage and retasked
ACTION buses will lead to a decrease in the public transport subsidy. Many construction jobs will be immediately created.

Transit oriented development will act as an economic growth driver. Businesses will establish themselves along the corridor knowing that parking wont be required for all staff, and that clients can visit them with ease.

Light rail will alleviate road congestion, mitigate future road construction costs and lead to a reversal in falling public transport patronage by attracting new passengers. Tourists visiting the nations capital will no longer get lost on the wrong bus.

Increased density along the corridor will lead to more walking, and a rise in the number of small businesses to service the needs of new residents. As Capital Metro expands across Canberra, this will be
repeated.

The longer term benefits of light rail will be seen as its influence in shaping Canberras growth and culture emerge over several decades. Those preferring a suburban house and backyard will still have that
option, but people seeking an apartment style of living will have that option in more quantity, and at lower cost.

Bullet trains may be wonderful technology and one day in the future deserving of finance, however the immediate priority for Canberra’s ratepayers is not visiting Sydney in 30 minutes, but commuting to work
in 30 minutes.

Damien Haas is the Chair of ACT Light Rail, the Capital regions peak public transport lobby group. It has been lobbying for light rail and improved public transport since the early 1990’s. It has a webpage at
www.actlighrail.info and a very active facebook page at ‘Light rail for Canberra’ https://www.facebook.com/groups/actlightrail/

Tim Bohm
President, Bullet Train for Australia Party

tim-bohm-picture

23 mins to Gungahlin or 57 mins to Sydney?

I want to state from the start that I think light rail would be great to have. But do we need it right now? Light rail from Gungahlin to Civic will be great for 20,000 Canberrans, whereas a Bullet Train connecting Canberra to Sydney will benefit 400,000+ Canberrans and surrounding residents.

Light rail and high-speed-rail (HSR) have very similar benefits. Jobs, environmental benefits, economic benefits, cutting the reliance on cars etc etc. The main difference being, all benefits are magnified for high-speed-rail. The latest Federal Government report stated that investment in HSR would return $2.30 to the community for every dollar spent, whereas the light rail is being reported as being as low as $0.43 to $1.02 return.

Why does Gungahlin to Civic need a 12km light rail route? Surely a dedicated bus lane with an express service down Northbourne would be just as quick as light rail, cost less and be more flexible.

Does Canberra need quicker and faster interstate travel options? YES. Would increased access to Canberra help stop public service jobs and departments being shipped interstate? YES. Would HSR open up Canberra to new tourist markets and interstate commuters? YES. Does Canberra and Australia need a brand new industry now more than ever? YES.

Over 1 million people fly between Canberra and Sydney every year and with SYD to MELB being the 5th busiest route in the world it’s hard to claim HSR would not have the passengers to support it. Where as Light Rail from Gungahlin to Civic will be flat out trying to get enough passengers to ensure the whole thing doesn’t turn into a billion dollar white elephant.

HSR will happen and when it does will the ACT be able to fund it’s share of the costs along side the NSW, QLD, VIC and Federal Governments or will our commitment of $65 million per year for 15 years for a 12km of track between Gungahlin and Civic mean we can’t afford it?

The government should be looking at all public transport options and future needs of the city rather than blindly committing to 12km of light rail just to be in power for 4 years. Lets not waste a billion dollar opportunity, if Gungahlin to Civic goes ahead and fails, no government in the ACT will ever spend the same amount of time, money and resources on public transport ever again.

Our local and federal politicians have the opportunity to make HSR happen now for all Canberrans and all Australians. All it would take is for the government to put in half as much of the energy and resources that they have into light rail and I am confident we would be on our way to getting Australia’s next and most important piece of infrastructure up and running.

Alternatively, our politicians could continue to think in three and four year election cycles, play games with each other and completely ignore the need for HSR and the huge benefits, it would bring to every single Canberran now and for future generations.

A born and bred Canberran, Tim has been waiting his whole life for high-speed-rail, sick of waiting Tim and some friends set up the Bullet Train for Australia party.

What’s Your opinion?


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35 Responses to
RiotACT Face Off: Light Rail or Bullet Train
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dungfungus 8:53 am 12 Aug 14

Ben_Dover said :

dungfungus said :

Ben_Dover said :

Light rail from Gungahlin to Civic will be great for 200 Canberrans, whereas a Bullet Train connecting Canberra to Sydney will benefit 400,000+ Canberrans and surrounding residents.

Fixed that for you.

My experience from travelling on VFTs overseas is that that unless the tickets are purchased well in advance they are too expensive for the average punter to buy “on the day”.
VFT’s are great for the plan-ahead tourists, business people and the wealthy.
The current Canberra-Sydney-Canberra Xplorer service (and the Indian Pacific) is heavily patronised by concession card holders who pay next to nothing for the former. This is not sustainable now and it won’t be available on a VFT.
If a subsidised Canberra – Sydney VFT is introduced it will put the airlines out of business just the same as what happened when the French TGV started running from Paris to Lyon.
This is not what you probably not what you want to hear and while our federal, state and territory governments are already overcommitted there is absolutely no hope of it ever happening.

Did you quote the wrong person there? Your reply bears absolutely no relevance to my post.

You referred to 400,000 Canberrans and surrounding residnets benefiting from a VFT travelling to Sydney.
I was pointing out that they won’t benefit at all.

Ben_Dover 7:47 am 12 Aug 14

dungfungus said :

Ben_Dover said :

Light rail from Gungahlin to Civic will be great for 200 Canberrans, whereas a Bullet Train connecting Canberra to Sydney will benefit 400,000+ Canberrans and surrounding residents.

Fixed that for you.

My experience from travelling on VFTs overseas is that that unless the tickets are purchased well in advance they are too expensive for the average punter to buy “on the day”.
VFT’s are great for the plan-ahead tourists, business people and the wealthy.
The current Canberra-Sydney-Canberra Xplorer service (and the Indian Pacific) is heavily patronised by concession card holders who pay next to nothing for the former. This is not sustainable now and it won’t be available on a VFT.
If a subsidised Canberra – Sydney VFT is introduced it will put the airlines out of business just the same as what happened when the French TGV started running from Paris to Lyon.
This is not what you probably not what you want to hear and while our federal, state and territory governments are already overcommitted there is absolutely no hope of it ever happening.

Did you quote the wrong person there? Your reply bears absolutely no relevance to my post.

milkman 6:57 am 12 Aug 14

Postalgeek said :

All-or-none arguments can go to hell.

+100000000000

Tim Bohm 5:58 am 12 Aug 14

HOW TO PAY FOR A EAST COAST BULLET TRAIN NETWORK
———-
15 yr investment of $5.3 billion per year ($80 billion total) required:
• $20 billion will be privately-funded ($1.3 billion per year)
• $60 billion to be invested by government ($4 billion per year)

$4 billion per year of government investment required (over a 15yr period)
———-
YEARLY INVESTMENT: Proposed breakdown for the required $4 billion:
$1.5 billion per year (investment by Fed Gov over 15 years)
$1.4 billion per year (invested by NSW Gov over 15 years)
$0.6 billion ($600 million) per year (invested by VIC Gov over 15 years)
$0.35 billion ($350 million) per year (invested by QLD Gov over 15 years)
$0.15 billion ($150 million) per year (invested by ACT Gov over 15 years)
Total $4 billion per year

*For every $1 invested in HSR $2.30 will be returned to the community. It will be a silver bullet for our economy!

HSR is an major project and should be viewed as the Snowy Mountains Scheme of the 21st Century. Our costing above are based on the 2014 BZE & University of Melbourne HSR Report and are over a 15 year period.

The recently leaked Infrastructure Australia report shows ‘Billions spent on roads in “hideously inefficient” way’, this combined with the $27 billion of transport projects announced in the May budget, make the required $4 billion a year sound and seem very achievable.

We don’t have professional lobbyists, billionaires, or influential people in industry and society to put pressure on our politicians at any level of government; local, state or federal to make HSR happen. All we have is you!

Which is great because without you HSR will never happen. We don’t need lobbyists and dirty back room deals.

We want HSR to be a project for the people by the people. We want you to demand high speed rail from our local and federal politicians and parties.

Enough is enough. Write, ring, email your local MLA and federal member and ask why have they been ignoring HSR?

gooterz 12:08 am 12 Aug 14

’23 mins to Gungahlin or 57 mins to Sydney?’
Sad fact is on a weekend its quicker to go to Sydney than it is to go across Belconnen to Tuggeranong. Due to change over and taking the wonky route through suburbia, on an express bus

rommeldog56 11:19 pm 11 Aug 14

dungfungus said :

I think it is time for all to have a cup of tea, a Bex and a good lie down.
Canberra is simply a large regional city that exists on the behest of the taxpayer.
It’s aggregate growth appears to have peaked.
While our main export industry (education) is growing the main employer (public service) is shrinking.
The emerging “industry” is retirees and they are already under financial stress as Canberra is too expensive to live in retirement so their disposable income will be depleted.
Rather than aim to cater for a population of 500,000 plus, the ACT Government should look to consolidating on what we have now and respond only to real needs.
The last thing we need to do is borrow huge sums of money to fund visionary infrastructure projects of the “build it and they will come” types. In fact, we already have a huge deficit and no government has ever spent its way out of debt.
The light rail, new (even smaller) stadium, the new convention centre and any talk of a VFT must be taken off the agenda immediately.
Over the top and backdoor funding of underperforming professional sporting teams must cease.
It was a terrible mistake to increase the size of the assembly also. The only benefit that may accrue is that some new members may have more of clue of how hard it is to earn a dollar and invest it wisely.

Geeez Dung, much of what u say actually makes good sense. Well said. My sentiments exactly. Artificial “stimulation” of the ACT economy has to be repaid – that will strangle recovery. Yet another smaller, sporting stadium is not needed either. We come nowhere near filling Canberra Stadium nowdays anyway.

gooterz 9:54 pm 11 Aug 14

Haas, what does light rail give over having premeditated traffic lights that pick up on the buses GPS’s position?

The value of a spice has always been the distance it took to travel.

Light rail is only a temporary solution a real transit network only has value underground.

Plus i’m sure tourists will spend all day wondering what to see in gunners.

miz 9:49 pm 11 Aug 14

As I am far more likely to want to go to Sydney than dormitory suburbia and I could already get to Gunners on a 200 bus in 23 mins from Civic without a cent spent on light rail if I wanted to, VFT gets my vote.

rommeldog56 7:14 pm 11 Aug 14

It’s simple really. VFT will bring ongoing economic benefits to Canberra in the form of day trippers and other tourists. Vice versa re convenience of ACT residents traveling to Sydney/Melbourne.

The toy train set will only benefit Gunners residents. I can not see people in Tuggers travelling to Gunners just to have a ride on it. I can not see it as a tourist attraction. When the initial construction phase is over, it will be a drain on the local economy, it won’t help economic development or widening the ACT employment base one iota. Yeah – go on and just do it. Makes perfect sense.

Masquara 6:48 pm 11 Aug 14

Why is our light rail advocate photographed against the Sydney Harbour Bridge? Has he actually spent much time in Canberra?

dungfungus 6:20 pm 11 Aug 14

Ben_Dover said :

Light rail from Gungahlin to Civic will be great for 200 Canberrans, whereas a Bullet Train connecting Canberra to Sydney will benefit 400,000+ Canberrans and surrounding residents.

Fixed that for you.

My experience from travelling on VFTs overseas is that that unless the tickets are purchased well in advance they are too expensive for the average punter to buy “on the day”.
VFT’s are great for the plan-ahead tourists, business people and the wealthy.
The current Canberra-Sydney-Canberra Xplorer service (and the Indian Pacific) is heavily patronised by concession card holders who pay next to nothing for the former. This is not sustainable now and it won’t be available on a VFT.
If a subsidised Canberra – Sydney VFT is introduced it will put the airlines out of business just the same as what happened when the French TGV started running from Paris to Lyon.
This is not what you probably not what you want to hear and while our federal, state and territory governments are already overcommitted there is absolutely no hope of it ever happening.

dungfungus 5:57 pm 11 Aug 14

I think it is time for all to have a cup of tea, a Bex and a good lie down.
Canberra is simply a large regional city that exists on the behest of the taxpayer.
It’s aggregate growth appears to have peaked.
While our main export industry (education) is growing the main employer (public service) is shrinking.
The emerging “industry” is retirees and they are already under financial stress as Canberra is too expensive to live in retirement so their disposable income will be depleted.
Rather than aim to cater for a population of 500,000 plus, the ACT Government should look to consolidating on what we have now and respond only to real needs.
The last thing we need to do is borrow huge sums of money to fund visionary infrastructure projects of the “build it and they will come” types. In fact, we already have a huge deficit and no government has ever spent its way out of debt.
The light rail, new (even smaller) stadium, the new convention centre and any talk of a VFT must be taken off the agenda immediately.
Over the top and backdoor funding of underperforming professional sporting teams must cease.
It was a terrible mistake to increase the size of the assembly also. The only benefit that may accrue is that some new members may have more of clue of how hard it is to earn a dollar and invest it wisely.

Postalgeek 5:03 pm 11 Aug 14

I’d be happy with a Bus Rapid Transit system and an XPT that could sustain its maximum service speed of 160kmph to Sydney.

All-or-none arguments can go to hell.

Ben_Dover 4:51 pm 11 Aug 14

Light rail from Gungahlin to Civic will be great for 200 Canberrans, whereas a Bullet Train connecting Canberra to Sydney will benefit 400,000+ Canberrans and surrounding residents.

Fixed that for you.

dungfungus 4:13 pm 11 Aug 14

CBRDan said :

I am surprised that someone is trying to compare the 2. There is little to compare other than both being nice for rail enthusiasts. A bit like comparing an interstate coach to a small commuter motorcycle both move people but have a completely different function and the impact to the community is also vastly different.
I am pro both but do not think the ACT has enough commuters for VFT yet. We certainly have enough for Trams.

When formulating an opinion on this I need to consider the following.

– A tram supports a local community with a focus on local goals. With local gov commitments
– VFT supports a global (AU) community and would require funding and agreements across multiple agencies both federal and local
– A tram creates local jobs and a support network 100% focused in the ACT. Servicing, upgrades, maintenance and other will almost all be local with a tram service
– VFT will be serviced and maintained (most likely) in Sydney or Melbourne with only minor works performed locally. With a single stop (maybe 2) in the ACT
– A tram service will eliminate traffic during peak time and therefore possibly reduce the road toll and reduce costs in insurance due to fewer accidents down the main roads feeding our hubs. Count the bus accidents per annum versus tram accidents in low density cities
– VFT will eliminate traffic for interstate commuters but most will still use Air. VFT will not reduce trucks on the road and therefore not reduce the TCO of highways
– A tram service will service the low to mid economic class. Reducing the cost to live and work in the ACT therefore boosting the quality of life and reducing vehicles on the road for all users. Not just for the users in the tram zone
– VFT is for middle to high income people who need to commute at high speeds and who are time poor. People who cant afford the high cost of VFT tickets will still utilise bus services between CBR and SYD. As for the argument of meetings via VFT. The majority of meetings in the next 5 to 10 years will move more towards Video Conferencing as technology in this space explodes with higher speed internet and low cost Video Conferencing units

In summary I think light rail is a great idea as long as it is managed correctly and the stations are Canberra weather proof. Not a stick in the ground giving no protection in summer and winter like the bus stops. Please put in free parking at the major stops. With exit to parking via your tram ticket.

The salient point of your analysis is:
“light rail is a great idea”.
The operative word is “idea”.

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