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Shane Rattenbury, Greens for Molonglo, completes the Lego Challenge

By johnboy 26 September 2012 32

Last night the Greens’ Shane Rattenbury (Molonglo) came down to Duxton to strut show off his lego skills.

Shane’s priorities included: Community gardens, quality landscaping, quality housing, good insulation, a mosque, religious tolerance, cycle paths, a very fast train, a clean lake with live fish and triathlons, gay marriage, a covered canberra stadium in the city centre, new libraries, a new convention centre on the shores of the lake, wind turbines, nature reserves and bio diversity, feral dragons, a trail bike facility, police drone aircraft to end high speed police pursuits.

But don’t take my word for it, he explains all in the video.

The next one is scheduled is the Pirates’ Glen Takkenberg tonight at Zierholz@UC which is a great excuse to check out that newish venue.

Pictured is Shane’s drone aircraft:

motorsport facility


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32 Responses to
Shane Rattenbury, Greens for Molonglo, completes the Lego Challenge
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poetix 5:43 pm 27 Sep 12

It’s fauna playing panpipes.

Very meaty ones.

Jethro 5:27 pm 27 Sep 12

bigfeet said :

poetix said :

my sepia mate to the left is a Tasmanian Devil.

Thanks!

I’ve been trying to work out for some time what is was.

And now I know!

I thought it was a Faun playing panpipes.

thisnexus 4:54 pm 27 Sep 12

johnboy said :

Yeah but Malthus was wrong.

Prices rise, alternatives become economically attractive.

+1. and dude, John Boy, rad to see you get your rant on from time to time… I dont often agree with you, but Im always interested in which way you’ll come down on any given issue, its a quarter of the reason I read the RiotAct, because you often surprise me with how you write up the news of the day. just my humble opinion oh overlord.

bundah 2:26 pm 27 Sep 12

Thumper said :

poetix said :

Thumper said :

chewy14 said :

Wow,
who knew a lego challenge could turn into a deep discussion about the direction our society is heading

And the evolution of hedgehogs.

You’re not echidnaing…

Echidnas are just ugly antipodean hedgehogs…

Ugly? certainly not as ugly as some humans!

Thumper 12:36 pm 27 Sep 12

poetix said :

Thumper said :

chewy14 said :

Wow,
who knew a lego challenge could turn into a deep discussion about the direction our society is heading

And the evolution of hedgehogs.

You’re not echidnaing…

Echidnas are just ugly antipodean hedgehogs…

poetix 12:23 pm 27 Sep 12

Thumper said :

chewy14 said :

Wow,
who knew a lego challenge could turn into a deep discussion about the direction our society is heading

And the evolution of hedgehogs.

You’re not echidnaing…

Thumper 10:36 am 27 Sep 12

Community gardens, quality landscaping, quality housing, good insulation, a mosque, religious tolerance, cycle paths, a very fast train, a clean lake with live fish and triathlons, gay marriage, a covered canberra stadium in the city centre, new libraries, a new convention centre on the shores of the lake, wind turbines, nature reserves and bio diversity, feral dragons, a trail bike facility, police drone aircraft to end high speed police pursuits.

In all seriousness, you cannot really fault anything mentioned here, except maybe drones.

And also the question of where wind turbines will be placed.

Personally I’d like to see every building the ACT covered in solar panels given that we have so much sunlight.

Thumper 10:32 am 27 Sep 12

chewy14 said :

Wow,
who knew a lego challenge could turn into a deep discussion about the direction our society is heading

And the evolution of hedgehogs.

poetix 10:03 am 27 Sep 12

poetix said :

johnboy said :


50 years ago hedgehogs in the UK were getting wiped out by cars because they curled in a ball when lights came on them.

Today the descendants of the hedgehogs who kept running are thriving.

Life is very resilient.

(but ways to run over less hedgehogs would be awesome)

Ditto wombats, who are thick in every sense. ?

I try to avoid thinking too much about these wider issues any more, as I lack your optimism. ?Your next point @15 is undermined a little by the fact that in countries such as India and China, we are seeing a growing imbalance in favour of more men as sex-selective abortion and, on a lesser scale, infanticide of female babies is practised. ?This is in educated middle class families as well. Smaller families, but more boys. ?I can’t see how that can be good for world peace and so on. I don’t think women are naturally peaceful, but a society that puts them down as worthless would tend to idiolise ‘masculine’ traits.

Amazing the discussion a little Lego can generate. ?Perhaps we need to do the world in 100 years in Lego. ?Just melt a couple of boxes with a blowtorch?

I’m riotous fun tonight.

(bundah: my sepia mate to the left is a Tasmanian Devil.)

I didn’t put all those question marks in. I’m not that indecisive. Something weird happened. It must be the puter drones, searching for pessimism. I’ll blame Shane!

chewy14 9:46 am 27 Sep 12

Wow,
who knew a lego challenge could turn into a deep discussion about the direction our society is heading

bundah 9:22 am 27 Sep 12

@Poetix

Thanks for letting the cat out of the bag coz i had wondered what the cute critter was you devil you!

bigfeet 6:44 am 27 Sep 12

poetix said :

my sepia mate to the left is a Tasmanian Devil.

Thanks!

I’ve been trying to work out for some time what is was.

And now I know!

Jethro 5:59 am 27 Sep 12

johnboy said :

Jethro said :

I think community gardens are a great idea. Localised food economies can only be a good thing.

I’m not sure Malthus was wrong, just wrong on dates. The green revolution wasn’t expected. Undoubtably there will be similar ‘green revolutions’. At the end of the day though, the world has a finite carrying capacity. 7 billion people could simply not have the way of life we lucky few do today. It’s not possible. I do see a need for us to step back from the lifestyles we currently maintain. It’s an individual choice and one that more individuals are making. I made mine a few ears back and have been making baby steps. Hopefully I will keep making them until I get to where I want to be.

Population growth tends to grow through a big spurt when infant mortality is tamed, and then fall back when parents feel confident their children have a good chance of living to adulthood, and women let their men know they don’t want to be baby farms. (men tend to like wives with bodies not utterly ravaged by childbirth too)

There’s an established cycle of good medicine creating a population boom followed by birth control creating a downward trending population.

I’d be surprised if the global population goes over 10 bill. It’s certainly not going to be an uncontrolled upward spiral.

What I’m saying though is that even if we stabilise now at 7 billion, it isn’t possible to give every 7 billion people the same standard of living and level of consumption as we have. Clearly we don’t want to deny those living in poverty a better life. Perhaps that means we in the developed world need to be willing to have and consume less?

Overheard 5:08 am 27 Sep 12

At one point one of the boxes tipped over and there was a near-environmental disaster as toxic levels of Lego spilled onto the carpet and threatened the fragile eco-system that is the back room at The Duxton.

I think we can take some comfort in the fact that our current Speaker of the Assembly is also adept at cleaning up Lego spills.

Weird thing. Having finally sussed out how to tweet pics, and having tweeted many in the past couple of weeks, on the occasions I tried to tweet pics of Shane mopping up this near environmental disaster, Twitter jammed up and refused to play, but later allowed a Floriade ferris wheel shot.

Hmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm.

poetix 11:54 pm 26 Sep 12

johnboy said :


50 years ago hedgehogs in the UK were getting wiped out by cars because they curled in a ball when lights came on them.

Today the descendants of the hedgehogs who kept running are thriving.

Life is very resilient.

(but ways to run over less hedgehogs would be awesome)

Ditto wombats, who are thick in every sense. ?

I try to avoid thinking too much about these wider issues any more, as I lack your optimism. ?Your next point @15 is undermined a little by the fact that in countries such as India and China, we are seeing a growing imbalance in favour of more men as sex-selective abortion and, on a lesser scale, infanticide of female babies is practised. ?This is in educated middle class families as well. Smaller families, but more boys. ?I can’t see how that can be good for world peace and so on. I don’t think women are naturally peaceful, but a society that puts them down as worthless would tend to idiolise ‘masculine’ traits.

Amazing the discussion a little Lego can generate. ?Perhaps we need to do the world in 100 years in Lego. ?Just melt a couple of boxes with a blowtorch?

I’m riotous fun tonight.

(bundah: my sepia mate to the left is a Tasmanian Devil.)

bundah 11:40 pm 26 Sep 12

Speaking of cute critters there is a real concern that the facial tumour disease affecting our wild tassie devils could wipe them out within two decades if a cure is not found.This terrible aggressive parasitic cancer has,sadly,reduced their numbers by 70% since 1996.

bundah 11:16 pm 26 Sep 12

johnboy said :

bundah said :

Here’s a potential solution to increasing fish stocks

http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2009/08/090818-giant-robotic-fish-farms.html

Although i am concerned as to how we are going to tackle the massive problem of plastic rubbish in our oceans.

50 years ago hedgehogs in the UK were getting wiped out by cars because they curled in a ball when lights came on them.

Today the descendants of the hedgehogs who kept running are thriving.

Life is very resilient.

(but ways to run over less hedgehogs would be awesome)

Apparently there are 300,000 fewer hedgehogs in Britain now than a decade ago and about 50,000 die on the roads every year which is so sad coz they’re cute little buggers!

johnboy 11:12 pm 26 Sep 12

Jethro said :

I think community gardens are a great idea. Localised food economies can only be a good thing.

I’m not sure Malthus was wrong, just wrong on dates. The green revolution wasn’t expected. Undoubtably there will be similar ‘green revolutions’. At the end of the day though, the world has a finite carrying capacity. 7 billion people could simply not have the way of life we lucky few do today. It’s not possible. I do see a need for us to step back from the lifestyles we currently maintain. It’s an individual choice and one that more individuals are making. I made mine a few ears back and have been making baby steps. Hopefully I will keep making them until I get to where I want to be.

Population growth tends to grow through a big spurt when infant mortality is tamed, and then fall back when parents feel confident their children have a good chance of living to adulthood, and women let their men know they don’t want to be baby farms. (men tend to like wives with bodies not utterly ravaged by childbirth too)

There’s an established cycle of good medicine creating a population boom followed by birth control creating a downward trending population.

I’d be surprised if the global population goes over 10 bill. It’s certainly not going to be an uncontrolled upward spiral.

johnboy 11:06 pm 26 Sep 12

bundah said :

Here’s a potential solution to increasing fish stocks

http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2009/08/090818-giant-robotic-fish-farms.html

Although i am concerned as to how we are going to tackle the massive problem of plastic rubbish in our oceans.

50 years ago hedgehogs in the UK were getting wiped out by cars because they curled in a ball when lights came on them.

Today the descendants of the hedgehogs who kept running are thriving.

Life is very resilient.

(but ways to run over less hedgehogs would be awesome)

Jethro 11:05 pm 26 Sep 12

I think community gardens are a great idea. Localised food economies can only be a good thing.

I’m not sure Malthus was wrong, just wrong on dates. The green revolution wasn’t expected. Undoubtably there will be similar ‘green revolutions’. At the end of the day though, the world has a finite carrying capacity. 7 billion people could simply not have the way of life we lucky few do today. It’s not possible. I do see a need for us to step back from the lifestyles we currently maintain. It’s an individual choice and one that more individuals are making. I made mine a few ears back and have been making baby steps. Hopefully I will keep making them until I get to where I want to be.

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