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Should we digitally name and shame Canberra’s bad drivers?

Marcus Paul 4 August 2015 55

car-stock031214

I love social media sites, especially those community notice boards. Occasionally they throw up little gems like these:

“And the employee of the week goes to…. the wing nut from xxx Company driving a white Territory xxx number plate  through Murrumbateman this morning. Your skill in driving that motorcyclist off the road at the end of the overtaking lane before McIntosh was carried out in a true ‘I don’t give a sh*t’ style. You upped the ante by speeding through the road works and then you forced another vehicle on to the shoulder at the end of the Capricorn overtaking merge. Outstanding examples of truly crap driving – you represent your employer well!

And this :

Must be the morning for morons! I reported the toyota with the numberplate “XXX'” to the police this morning as they got cranky that no-one would let them speed through the roadworks and then came from 2 cars behind to run me off the road at the Capricorn over taking lane , I hope mine and yours meet each other one morning in a head on and then that will be 2 less w*nkers to deal with !

Wow.

I’ve deleted out number plate details, and hidden the companies name for this exercise. However the question needs to be asked: Is it ever okay to name and shame on social media? Sure, a good vent with like minded people might make you feel better, and perhaps even solicit responses such as that highlighted above.

However, is it dangerous? After all what happens if someone loses a job over this and then decides to go online and finds the person who posted the evidence? Some people even post dash cam videos or snap pictures on mobile phones and post.

Sure, from time to time I’ve named and shamed car owners who have blatantly illegally parked in disabled spots, but usually only after a bit of thought. I am usually left though with the feeling I have possibly breached someone’s privacy in some way. My one rule here though is if it’s a diplomatic vehicle I’m right onto it. Last year, I named the same US Embassy DC plated car stopping in a disabled spot day after day. Eventually, we received an apology and a promise the law would not be broken again.

There will be some people who might say they deserved it because they’re doing the wrong thing, endangering lives, or making disabled parking difficult. Some might even say it’s none of my business, it’s police who deal with this.

Really, try calling Gungahlin or Tuggeranong police with a complaint that someone nearly ran you off the road and due to lack of evidence or the fact no-one was actually hurt, it ends up it being a low priority if at all.

So, over to you RiotACT folk. Name and shame – or simply let it be?

Should bad drivers be named and shamed?

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Marcus Paul is the host of Canberra Live 3pm weekdays on 2CC.


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Should we digitally name and shame Canberra’s bad drivers?
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Maya123 3:28 pm 07 Aug 15

Antagonist said :

Maya123 said :

Yes, my car was written off about a fortnight ago, by a tail-ender, and the person following was not following that closely. Just shows how much distance is needed to stop suddenly. ** It was the driver in front of me who stopped suddenly that caused all this.** I only just managed to miss them, by steering sharply left. Unfortunately the car behind me didn’t miss my car.

– My emphasis added.

Are you really sure it was the driver in front of you that caused all of this? If you only just managed to miss the car in front of you “by steering sharply left”, then you were also travelling too close to the car in front of you. You did not leave yourself enough space to brake safely. I put it to you that you are equally to blame.

But I didn’t hit anyone. The car in front of me was undamaged. Yes, I might have been a bit close. If I had to steer to the left I likely was. Which, as I said, just goes to show how much distance is needed between cars, because I was not travelling any closer than most other cars; in fact further back than many; probably including the car behind me, which I did not consider was tailgating me.
What happened was that the car in front on Horse Park Drive, suddenly stopped without pre-indication to turn right from NOT the right hand lane. I took evasive action and missed them completely, but the car behind didn’t miss me, even though I was now partly beside the car in front. At least the car behind was fully insured, and the driver seemed like a nice person and took full responsibility.

Antagonist 3:08 pm 07 Aug 15

Maya123 said :

Yes, my car was written off about a fortnight ago, by a tail-ender, and the person following was not following that closely. Just shows how much distance is needed to stop suddenly. ** It was the driver in front of me who stopped suddenly that caused all this.** I only just managed to miss them, by steering sharply left. Unfortunately the car behind me didn’t miss my car.

– My emphasis added.

Are you really sure it was the driver in front of you that caused all of this? If you only just managed to miss the car in front of you “by steering sharply left”, then you were also travelling too close to the car in front of you. You did not leave yourself enough space to brake safely. I put it to you that you are equally to blame.

Tooks 2:52 pm 07 Aug 15

tim_c said :

If road users could see the Police taking an active role in enforcing traffic rules, the public wouldn’t feel such a need to take matters into their own hands

So just if a road user doesn’t see the police enforcing the law, then they should take matters into their own hands? That is ridiculous.

Maya123 1:54 pm 07 Aug 15

cbrmale said :

tim_c said :

Evilomlap said :

I really take issue with these complaints about the ‘lack of police presence’ in the ACT. I know and have worked with ACT police at varying levels. They do the absolute best they can with the limited resources at their disposal, and the police you want out policing minor traffic offences 24/7 have no say in the allocation of those resources. If the choice is between ‘monitoring’ some hoon more closely, or attending a domestic violence 000 call, it’s obvious which one the ONE patrol car available for the entire northside that night (because the two others are tied up blocking off lanes at a traffic collision on Belconnen Way) is going to be dispatched to.

I can guarantee you police presence at any call out is never because of a lack of dedication or because they can’t be bothered, it’s because they are busy doing something else that is more important at that particular moment. Believe me they would love to be able to dedicate a whole car for a whole day to drive around targeting bad drivers but unfortunately they just can’t do it.

Take issue all you like – it doesn’t mean it’s not an issue. When was the last time you saw a Police car pull someone over for a traffic offence? When was the last time you saw a traffic offence that they probably should have at least been cautioned on? Why have rules if they’re not going to be enforced?

I’m not blaming the Police for not doing their job – they are doing what they’re given budget to do (what’s left after funding the legacy projects of various Canberra City councillors) and what they’re instructed to do by a government that thinks it can solve all the traffic chaos with a few speed cameras, speed bumps and ever reducing speed limits, 60km/h, then 50, then 40, now 30km/h. Any one who drives with their eyes open will tell you it’s not working. The statistics tell us it’s not working.

If only road “accidents” were treated with the same seriousness as accidents with other workplace equipment or even firearms, we might see the number of deaths and injuries on our roads reducing.

You’re absolutely right, and the number one issue to be dealt with is tailgating. When I managed a fleet I had to take cars for assessment at AAMI and there were maybe 300 cars there, and about 49% of those cars had the front smashed in and about 49% had the rear smashed in.

The only time I ever see police enforcing road rules is when they have the speed guns out. All other roads rules: tailgating, failing to give way, failing to use indicators, driving unroadworthy cars; are basically unenforced. While the police are chronically under-resourced, I think that most Canberra drivers would like to see more emphasis on driving problems other than speeding. Especially tailgating, because the material and personal costs of front to rear crashes is substantial.

cbrmale said :

tim_c said :

Evilomlap said :

I really take issue with these complaints about the ‘lack of police presence’ in the ACT. I know and have worked with ACT police at varying levels. They do the absolute best they can with the limited resources at their disposal, and the police you want out policing minor traffic offences 24/7 have no say in the allocation of those resources. If the choice is between ‘monitoring’ some hoon more closely, or attending a domestic violence 000 call, it’s obvious which one the ONE patrol car available for the entire northside that night (because the two others are tied up blocking off lanes at a traffic collision on Belconnen Way) is going to be dispatched to.

I can guarantee you police presence at any call out is never because of a lack of dedication or because they can’t be bothered, it’s because they are busy doing something else that is more important at that particular moment. Believe me they would love to be able to dedicate a whole car for a whole day to drive around targeting bad drivers but unfortunately they just can’t do it.

Take issue all you like – it doesn’t mean it’s not an issue. When was the last time you saw a Police car pull someone over for a traffic offence? When was the last time you saw a traffic offence that they probably should have at least been cautioned on? Why have rules if they’re not going to be enforced?

I’m not blaming the Police for not doing their job – they are doing what they’re given budget to do (what’s left after funding the legacy projects of various Canberra City councillors) and what they’re instructed to do by a government that thinks it can solve all the traffic chaos with a few speed cameras, speed bumps and ever reducing speed limits, 60km/h, then 50, then 40, now 30km/h. Any one who drives with their eyes open will tell you it’s not working. The statistics tell us it’s not working.

If only road “accidents” were treated with the same seriousness as accidents with other workplace equipment or even firearms, we might see the number of deaths and injuries on our roads reducing.

You’re absolutely right, and the number one issue to be dealt with is tailgating. When I managed a fleet I had to take cars for assessment at AAMI and there were maybe 300 cars there, and about 49% of those cars had the front smashed in and about 49% had the rear smashed in.

The only time I ever see police enforcing road rules is when they have the speed guns out. All other roads rules: tailgating, failing to give way, failing to use indicators, driving unroadworthy cars; are basically unenforced. While the police are chronically under-resourced, I think that most Canberra drivers would like to see more emphasis on driving problems other than speeding. Especially tailgating, because the material and personal costs of front to rear crashes is substantial.

“Especially tailgating, because the material and personal costs of front to rear crashes is substantial.”

Yes, my car was written off about a fortnight ago, by a tail-ender, and the person following was not following that closely. Just shows how much distance is needed to stop suddenly. It was the driver in front of me who stopped suddenly that caused all this. I only just managed to miss them, by steering sharply left. Unfortunately the car behind me didn’t miss my car.

vintage123 1:40 pm 07 Aug 15

cbrmale said :

tim_c said :

Evilomlap said :

I really take issue with these complaints about the ‘lack of police presence’ in the ACT. I know and have worked with ACT police at varying levels. They do the absolute best they can with the limited resources at their disposal, and the police you want out policing minor traffic offences 24/7 have no say in the allocation of those resources. If the choice is between ‘monitoring’ some hoon more closely, or attending a domestic violence 000 call, it’s obvious which one the ONE patrol car available for the entire northside that night (because the two others are tied up blocking off lanes at a traffic collision on Belconnen Way) is going to be dispatched to.

I can guarantee you police presence at any call out is never because of a lack of dedication or because they can’t be bothered, it’s because they are busy doing something else that is more important at that particular moment. Believe me they would love to be able to dedicate a whole car for a whole day to drive around targeting bad drivers but unfortunately they just can’t do it.

Take issue all you like – it doesn’t mean it’s not an issue. When was the last time you saw a Police car pull someone over for a traffic offence? When was the last time you saw a traffic offence that they probably should have at least been cautioned on? Why have rules if they’re not going to be enforced?

I’m not blaming the Police for not doing their job – they are doing what they’re given budget to do (what’s left after funding the legacy projects of various Canberra City councillors) and what they’re instructed to do by a government that thinks it can solve all the traffic chaos with a few speed cameras, speed bumps and ever reducing speed limits, 60km/h, then 50, then 40, now 30km/h. Any one who drives with their eyes open will tell you it’s not working. The statistics tell us it’s not working.

If only road “accidents” were treated with the same seriousness as accidents with other workplace equipment or even firearms, we might see the number of deaths and injuries on our roads reducing.

You’re absolutely right, and the number one issue to be dealt with is tailgating. When I managed a fleet I had to take cars for assessment at AAMI and there were maybe 300 cars there, and about 49% of those cars had the front smashed in and about 49% had the rear smashed in.

The only time I ever see police enforcing road rules is when they have the speed guns out. All other roads rules: tailgating, failing to give way, failing to use indicators, driving unroadworthy cars; are basically unenforced. While the police are chronically under-resourced, I think that most Canberra drivers would like to see more emphasis on driving problems other than speeding. Especially tailgating, because the material and personal costs of front to rear crashes is substantial.

Other infringements are too hard for police to prove in court if challenged. Speeding is the easiest to prove as it has the evidence. Also the overheads for speeding are lower. Police sit in a known spot and radar people. Done.

The days of police driving around and pinging people for other things is long gone. If police are driving, it means they are going from the station to call, like a theft or domestic or something. They don’t just drive around looking anymore. They just turn a blind eye, unless it’s an accident, and no other police are there.

To be honest, they really could outsource speeding functions.

MERC600 1:26 pm 07 Aug 15

cranky said :

I have had a dashcam for a couple of years now.
Had a total idiot carve me up on Mugga Lane, who had to come back to the same speed as the rest of the traffic immediately. He knew he had buggered up, and I tapped the camera as he looked in his rear vision mirror.

What a transformation.

Strictly to the speed limit. Perfectly in his lane. I was chuffed by the result.

I still haven’t got one of these things. Some, with their bracket, seem so large they must block/hinder the drivers view. Couldn’t you skittle someone unwisely stepping off the footpath.
And do they record speed as well ? as seemingly indicated by your the Mugga Lane quote.

cbrmale 1:17 pm 07 Aug 15

tim_c said :

Evilomlap said :

I really take issue with these complaints about the ‘lack of police presence’ in the ACT. I know and have worked with ACT police at varying levels. They do the absolute best they can with the limited resources at their disposal, and the police you want out policing minor traffic offences 24/7 have no say in the allocation of those resources. If the choice is between ‘monitoring’ some hoon more closely, or attending a domestic violence 000 call, it’s obvious which one the ONE patrol car available for the entire northside that night (because the two others are tied up blocking off lanes at a traffic collision on Belconnen Way) is going to be dispatched to.

I can guarantee you police presence at any call out is never because of a lack of dedication or because they can’t be bothered, it’s because they are busy doing something else that is more important at that particular moment. Believe me they would love to be able to dedicate a whole car for a whole day to drive around targeting bad drivers but unfortunately they just can’t do it.

Take issue all you like – it doesn’t mean it’s not an issue. When was the last time you saw a Police car pull someone over for a traffic offence? When was the last time you saw a traffic offence that they probably should have at least been cautioned on? Why have rules if they’re not going to be enforced?

I’m not blaming the Police for not doing their job – they are doing what they’re given budget to do (what’s left after funding the legacy projects of various Canberra City councillors) and what they’re instructed to do by a government that thinks it can solve all the traffic chaos with a few speed cameras, speed bumps and ever reducing speed limits, 60km/h, then 50, then 40, now 30km/h. Any one who drives with their eyes open will tell you it’s not working. The statistics tell us it’s not working.

If only road “accidents” were treated with the same seriousness as accidents with other workplace equipment or even firearms, we might see the number of deaths and injuries on our roads reducing.

You’re absolutely right, and the number one issue to be dealt with is tailgating. When I managed a fleet I had to take cars for assessment at AAMI and there were maybe 300 cars there, and about 49% of those cars had the front smashed in and about 49% had the rear smashed in.

The only time I ever see police enforcing road rules is when they have the speed guns out. All other roads rules: tailgating, failing to give way, failing to use indicators, driving unroadworthy cars; are basically unenforced. While the police are chronically under-resourced, I think that most Canberra drivers would like to see more emphasis on driving problems other than speeding. Especially tailgating, because the material and personal costs of front to rear crashes is substantial.

cbrmale 1:07 pm 07 Aug 15

Antagonist said :

As a general rule of thumb, my answer is no. At the same time, long term Rioters will remember the outcome achieved when the MAMILs got their lycra all twisted up over the epic Jims Mowing incident.

Just out of interest, what dashcams can people recommend? Preferably one that will record good quality forward and rear vision?

I have a Vicovation Marcus 5 which records high definition front and rear onto a single SD card, and it was the only HD front and rear camera I could find. I had to adjust the exposure of the front camera for Canberra’s bright sunshine or else it filmed tinged blue. The aggressive tailgating that you will see out of a rear camera can be frightening at times.

Yesterday I had a near miss: I always look for eye contact and I got eye contact, but she pulled out when I was just metres away. I had already planned a potential escape route so a certain smash was avoided, although if I had been prevented from crossing to the opposite side of the road then things would have been different. She was a P plate driver and this was worth a visit to the police, and posting the clip on Road Shamer Australia.

Given the circumstances of my near miss I am 99.9% certain that the young female driver did not have the capacity to calculate speed and distance, and this is not the first time I have come across novice drivers in the ACT who do not have basic speed and distance perception. I believe that competency-based assessment is fundamentally flawed in that it requires assessment by the instructor who the learner is paying in order to get their licence. As a result there is the potential for incompetent drivers such as my young driver yesterday being able to get their licences. I would prefer competency-based assessment be augmented by an independent assessment of their driving skills.

tim_c 12:42 pm 07 Aug 15

Evilomlap said :

I really take issue with these complaints about the ‘lack of police presence’ in the ACT. I know and have worked with ACT police at varying levels. They do the absolute best they can with the limited resources at their disposal, and the police you want out policing minor traffic offences 24/7 have no say in the allocation of those resources. If the choice is between ‘monitoring’ some hoon more closely, or attending a domestic violence 000 call, it’s obvious which one the ONE patrol car available for the entire northside that night (because the two others are tied up blocking off lanes at a traffic collision on Belconnen Way) is going to be dispatched to.

I can guarantee you police presence at any call out is never because of a lack of dedication or because they can’t be bothered, it’s because they are busy doing something else that is more important at that particular moment. Believe me they would love to be able to dedicate a whole car for a whole day to drive around targeting bad drivers but unfortunately they just can’t do it.

Take issue all you like – it doesn’t mean it’s not an issue. When was the last time you saw a Police car pull someone over for a traffic offence? When was the last time you saw a traffic offence that they probably should have at least been cautioned on? Why have rules if they’re not going to be enforced?

I’m not blaming the Police for not doing their job – they are doing what they’re given budget to do (what’s left after funding the legacy projects of various Canberra City councillors) and what they’re instructed to do by a government that thinks it can solve all the traffic chaos with a few speed cameras, speed bumps and ever reducing speed limits, 60km/h, then 50, then 40, now 30km/h. Any one who drives with their eyes open will tell you it’s not working. The statistics tell us it’s not working.

If only road “accidents” were treated with the same seriousness as accidents with other workplace equipment or even firearms, we might see the number of deaths and injuries on our roads reducing.

Antagonist 10:30 am 07 Aug 15

As a general rule of thumb, my answer is no. At the same time, long term Rioters will remember the outcome achieved when the MAMILs got their lycra all twisted up over the epic Jims Mowing incident.

Just out of interest, what dashcams can people recommend? Preferably one that will record good quality forward and rear vision?

NoImRight 9:59 am 07 Aug 15

Evilomlap said :

tim_c said :

If road users could see the Police taking an active role in enforcing traffic rules, the public wouldn’t feel such a need to take matters into their own hands

I really take issue with these complaints about the ‘lack of police presence’ in the ACT. I know and have worked with ACT police at varying levels. They do the absolute best they can with the limited resources at their disposal, and the police you want out policing minor traffic offences 24/7 have no say in the allocation of those resources. If the choice is between ‘monitoring’ some hoon more closely, or attending a domestic violence 000 call, it’s obvious which one the ONE patrol car available for the entire northside that night (because the two others are tied up blocking off lanes at a traffic collision on Belconnen Way) is going to be dispatched to.

I can guarantee you police presence at any call out is never because of a lack of dedication or because they can’t be bothered, it’s because they are busy doing something else that is more important at that particular moment. Believe me they would love to be able to dedicate a whole car for a whole day to drive around targeting bad drivers but unfortunately they just can’t do it.

You will find, probably already do, that the Police cant win with the public. At the moment the internet is cluttered by complaints about speed cameras. A common complaint being “Police presence will deter speeders more than cameras”. Apart from many logistical errors in this claim you can guarantee if the Govt actually pushed this through the next round of complaints would be Police booking speeders instead of doing “real” work. I imagine thats the point of a lot of the Police reality shows that make the rounds. To show that Police deal with all sorts of dross on a daily basis.

Evilomlap 9:42 am 07 Aug 15

tim_c said :

If road users could see the Police taking an active role in enforcing traffic rules, the public wouldn’t feel such a need to take matters into their own hands

I really take issue with these complaints about the ‘lack of police presence’ in the ACT. I know and have worked with ACT police at varying levels. They do the absolute best they can with the limited resources at their disposal, and the police you want out policing minor traffic offences 24/7 have no say in the allocation of those resources. If the choice is between ‘monitoring’ some hoon more closely, or attending a domestic violence 000 call, it’s obvious which one the ONE patrol car available for the entire northside that night (because the two others are tied up blocking off lanes at a traffic collision on Belconnen Way) is going to be dispatched to.

I can guarantee you police presence at any call out is never because of a lack of dedication or because they can’t be bothered, it’s because they are busy doing something else that is more important at that particular moment. Believe me they would love to be able to dedicate a whole car for a whole day to drive around targeting bad drivers but unfortunately they just can’t do it.

Jordania 4:59 am 07 Aug 15

Name and shame on social media? No. Anyone who does that is basically employing anti-social media. If you don’t want it to be you outed and shamed on social media (and anyone who takes a dislike to your driving or other road habits is equally likely to shame you in a similar fashion), be a bit circumspect (and a little more targeted) with your complaint. If the offence/road-rage causing incident is caused by an identifiable vehicle then call the company concerned and make a complaint. I have done this twice (hello taxi driver who,very early one morning many years ago went through a red light on Limestone Avenue and nearly mowed me down; and hello company van driver who harassed and terrified a totally law-abiding cyclist (not me) on the Defence roundabout). Using social media for this purpose (as indeed for many others) is crude, over the top and pointless.

Innovation 6:56 pm 06 Aug 15

creative_canberran said :

Innovation said :

tim_c said :

Innovation said :

Rather than naming or shaming, the police should have sufficient IT resources to manage and record complaints against license numbers and then investigate after a designated number of random complaints or based on severity of complaints. Irresponsible drivers have a habit of making the same (deliberate) mistakes over and over again.

They already do this – if you report something via the crimestoppers online form, and the offence is considered serious enough, they will either investigate directly (ie. if someone runs you off the road because they’re talking on the phone), or if less they may put an alert against the registration. If they get enough alerts, they will apparently “monitor” that particular vehicle more closely.

It still burns me that when we were hit, the driver stopped, mouthed an apology and then drove off. We put in a police report but obviously the other driver didn’t. The police wouldn’t give us any details of the other driver and, when we tried to FOI the accident report all we would have got was a copy of our own report. The police didn’t even phone the other driver to ask them why they didn’t submit a report – let alone pursue the (alleged) offence. The behaviour of the other driver was a fair indication that they made a habit of hitting other cars and driving off. I’m trying to be generous in suggesting that police don’t have the IT respources sufficient to allow them to identify a pattern of behaviour or else why wouldn’t they at least make a phone call to the other driver or pay them a visit.

What did your insurer say? They have their own databases and as the one who pays, has a lot more clout for getting the other driver.

Unfortunately, the risk of excess and subsequent increased premiums (vs the cost of the damage for a still safe and driveable vehicle) wasn’t worth pursuing with the insurer. as well I have had two other experiences where the insurer readily takes the excess in the first instance and doesn’t make much effort to pursue the other at fault driver. Aalthough after much effort, because I could identify the other drivers in those accidents – and I had a dash cam in the second of those accidents – I won the disputes with the insurers in both of those cases.

creative_canberran 5:14 pm 06 Aug 15

Innovation said :

tim_c said :

Innovation said :

Rather than naming or shaming, the police should have sufficient IT resources to manage and record complaints against license numbers and then investigate after a designated number of random complaints or based on severity of complaints. Irresponsible drivers have a habit of making the same (deliberate) mistakes over and over again.

They already do this – if you report something via the crimestoppers online form, and the offence is considered serious enough, they will either investigate directly (ie. if someone runs you off the road because they’re talking on the phone), or if less they may put an alert against the registration. If they get enough alerts, they will apparently “monitor” that particular vehicle more closely.

It still burns me that when we were hit, the driver stopped, mouthed an apology and then drove off. We put in a police report but obviously the other driver didn’t. The police wouldn’t give us any details of the other driver and, when we tried to FOI the accident report all we would have got was a copy of our own report. The police didn’t even phone the other driver to ask them why they didn’t submit a report – let alone pursue the (alleged) offence. The behaviour of the other driver was a fair indication that they made a habit of hitting other cars and driving off. I’m trying to be generous in suggesting that police don’t have the IT respources sufficient to allow them to identify a pattern of behaviour or else why wouldn’t they at least make a phone call to the other driver or pay them a visit.

What did your insurer say? They have their own databases and as the one who pays, has a lot more clout for getting the other driver.

creative_canberran 4:21 pm 06 Aug 15

tim_c said :

If dealing with a company, it is most appropriate to contact that company directly in the first instance. Give them time to respond and decide what to do based on the response you get. I’ve had encouraging responses from a couple of companies who seem to understand that not all publicity is good publicity.

I was run off a roundabout a couple of year back by a mini-bus belonging to a local firm. Management took the complaint quite seriously when I told them. They appreciated that someone driving so dangerously in a vehicle with their livery wasn’t good advertising.

Innovation 4:18 pm 06 Aug 15

tim_c said :

Innovation said :

Rather than naming or shaming, the police should have sufficient IT resources to manage and record complaints against license numbers and then investigate after a designated number of random complaints or based on severity of complaints. Irresponsible drivers have a habit of making the same (deliberate) mistakes over and over again.

They already do this – if you report something via the crimestoppers online form, and the offence is considered serious enough, they will either investigate directly (ie. if someone runs you off the road because they’re talking on the phone), or if less they may put an alert against the registration. If they get enough alerts, they will apparently “monitor” that particular vehicle more closely.

It still burns me that when we were hit, the driver stopped, mouthed an apology and then drove off. We put in a police report but obviously the other driver didn’t. The police wouldn’t give us any details of the other driver and, when we tried to FOI the accident report all we would have got was a copy of our own report. The police didn’t even phone the other driver to ask them why they didn’t submit a report – let alone pursue the (alleged) offence. The behaviour of the other driver was a fair indication that they made a habit of hitting other cars and driving off. I’m trying to be generous in suggesting that police don’t have the IT respources sufficient to allow them to identify a pattern of behaviour or else why wouldn’t they at least make a phone call to the other driver or pay them a visit.

tim_c 3:44 pm 06 Aug 15

CBRDan said :

…Some of the things you see people do you do wish there was an AFP upload your evidence service. Even if the police couldn’t prove enough for a conviction and just showed up on the persons door and showed them the video it would make them think twice about doing it again.

I was previously instructed by ACT Police to load such videos to youtube as unlisted (so they’re not public), and then send the link to ACT Police (you can do this via the crimestoppers online form, which also has facility to upload images eg. a snapshot from your video). You may never hear back, but you can see how many times it’s been viewed, and if the Police are the only people you’ve given the link to, you know when they’ve at least looked at it.

tim_c 3:37 pm 06 Aug 15

Innovation said :

Rather than naming or shaming, the police should have sufficient IT resources to manage and record complaints against license numbers and then investigate after a designated number of random complaints or based on severity of complaints. Irresponsible drivers have a habit of making the same (deliberate) mistakes over and over again.

They already do this – if you report something via the crimestoppers online form, and the offence is considered serious enough, they will either investigate directly (ie. if someone runs you off the road because they’re talking on the phone), or if less they may put an alert against the registration. If they get enough alerts, they will apparently “monitor” that particular vehicle more closely.

tim_c 3:13 pm 06 Aug 15

If dealing with a company, it is most appropriate to contact that company directly in the first instance. Give them time to respond and decide what to do based on the response you get. I’ve had encouraging responses from a couple of companies who seem to understand that not all publicity is good publicity.

Having said that, had a certain lawn mowing franchise not been so publicly named and shamed (including some air time on this site) in June 2012, based on other experiences, I doubt to this day whether ACT Police would have felt quite so compelled to step in.

And where are the Police in Canberra?

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