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Show us the Money! RSPCA to ACT Government

By johnboy 26 October 2010 33

The RSPCA’s Michael Linke is noting they’ve had a busier than usual winter dealing with high numbers of native animals.

They’d now like more money from the ACT Government for the services performed on their behalf.

“These ongoing increases are not sustainable on current levels of government funding nor will our site cope with this volume of animals indefinitely. RSPCA ACT only receives about 10% of our funding from the ACT Government, the remainder comes for our community. I’d like to thank the Canberra community for their ongoing support.

“The community expects RSPCA to be there to support them with animal welfare issues, the government relies on us to administer the animal welfare act to educate the community and bring animal cruelty offenders to justice, the government continues to ask RSPCA to manage lost and stray animals with no commensurate funding. This work costs money and I am calling on the ACT government to make our funding request a priority.

“In light of the continued tough economic times it is imperative that the government quickly resolves our funding request and provides me with certainty about our future.”

The RSPCA

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Show us the Money! RSPCA to ACT Government
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Sandman 8:04 pm 13 Sep 15

I think the money should come from pet owners, not the tax payers.

Reducing the costs of pets from the RSPCA will only encourage more people who shouldn’t have one to get one. There are too many people with full time schedules who don’t have the time to give a dog or cat the attention it needs.
If you can’t do it 100% , you shouldn’t be doing it.

london 10:44 am 12 Sep 15

Perhaps if were given more money could keep a better check on animals. Never seen so many dogs in my life since moving to Canberra. Seems get a house get a dog. Tiny back yards huge dogs. Why? Don’t people understand about animal care, picking up droppings, walking on a leash and respect for other people and their property. All the money in the world won’t help until people get some common sense.

pinklink 12:38 pm 03 Nov 10

Thanks everyone for your supportive comments and votes.

One point that appears to have been missed is Gobbo’s suggestion that the government “donates” to RSPCA. The government does not donate.

Much like other NGO service providers RSPCA is partly funded for some services we deliver. For example, administration of the Animal Welfare Act – the community expects RSPCA to respond to cruelty complaints and as such we employ inspectors. Should enforcement of government legislation be paid for by voluntary donations or should the government fund this service? I think the government should fund it.

What about stray animal control? In other states RSPCA generally does not accept stray animals. This work is managed by local governments through local council pounds and paid for by state government through their council funding arrangements. In the ACT we only have one pound, and that pound only looks after adult dogs. So who looks after and pays for stray cats, kittens, stray puppies and the overflow of stray dogs? Plus the 700 odd other stray animals. Currently RSPCA does. The government does not fund this, we fund this.

I believe the government should fund this service and that RSPCA should use community support to assist with injured animals, wildlife support, support for vulnerable members of the community and their pets, discounted veterinary services, such as low cost desexign to assist with the reduction of animals presenting to our shelter and a host of other core animal welfare services.

We manage almost 9,000 animals annually, with up to 800 on site at any one time. We employ 55 people and our annual budget is about $3.5M. We engage 500 volunteers. 86% of our budget is spent directly on animal care, welfare and protection services.

Michael Linke
CEO
RSPCA ACT

georgesgenitals 7:53 am 03 Nov 10

weeziepops said :

Plus the cost of rent, insurance, vehicles, equipment, water, electricity, medication…

Exactly. +1.

jake555 9:29 pm 02 Nov 10

Gobbo said :

http://www.rspca-act.org.au/about-us/links-and-resources/

Gobbo 12:50 pm 02 Nov 10
weeziepops 12:06 pm 30 Oct 10

Plus the cost of rent, insurance, vehicles, equipment, water, electricity, medication…

jake555 9:24 am 30 Oct 10

Gobbo said :

How much is enough?

Am I wrong in thinking that the RSPCA received around $300K from the ACT Government last year and is getting $210K this financial year?

If that is only 10% of the local RSPCA’s funding, they are really making a motza when you consider all the volunteers that assist and all the freebie food they get given.

Wow! $210K really??!!! That’d pay $35K salaries for dozens of staff…..oh hang on…more like 6.

Gobbo 8:34 pm 29 Oct 10

How much is enough?

Am I wrong in thinking that the RSPCA received around $300K from the ACT Government last year and is getting $210K this financial year?

If that is only 10% of the local RSPCA’s funding, they are really making a motza when you consider all the volunteers that assist and all the freebie food they get given.

jake555 6:37 pm 29 Oct 10

churl said :

Hmmm
RSPCA helping native animals?
This would be the same organisation that was importing cats from Queensland a while ago…
To munch on the native animals.

churl said :

threepaws said :

I think you’ll find that never happened

for example:
“It’s purr-ty cold, and really just too hard to bear. Article from: Canberra Times | July 23, 2006
CANBERRA couples may be snuggling up as the temperature drops, but the cold weather is doing nothing for cats.
The official word from the RSPCA is that it is too cold for cats to breed, and it is creating a kitten crisis.
Luckily, 13 kittens from sunny Townsville jetted into frosty Canberra on Friday night to help alleviate the kitten drought.
Canberra RSPCA chief executive officer Michael Linke said the warmer temperatures in northern Queensland created a different breeding season.
”Cats breed when it is hot, and they have been breeding all winter in far north Queensland, and there is an excess supply.”

Thus the RSPCA seems beholden to cat and dog owners, rather than the wider animal world.

Big whoop. 13 kittens to ease the burden on Townsville RSPCA when Canberra had none. Believe it or not, people want cute, fluffy kittens regardless of the weather, while the adolescent/adult cats sit there waiting, hoping, for as long as it takes to find them a home.

13 kittens is a drop in the ocean compared with how many kittens go through that place in breeding season. If you want to preach the whole “cats munch on our wildlife” spiel, target cat owners, not RSPCA.

threepaws 12:38 pm 27 Oct 10

Things have changed since 2006.

If you are so worried about 13 kittens crossing borders, why don’t you get stuck into the people who advertise pets in the classifieds every weekend. You think they are all from Canberra?

churl 12:10 pm 27 Oct 10

threepaws said :

I think you’ll find that never happened

for example:
“It’s purr-ty cold, and really just too hard to bear. Article from: Canberra Times | July 23, 2006
CANBERRA couples may be snuggling up as the temperature drops, but the cold weather is doing nothing for cats.
The official word from the RSPCA is that it is too cold for cats to breed, and it is creating a kitten crisis.
Luckily, 13 kittens from sunny Townsville jetted into frosty Canberra on Friday night to help alleviate the kitten drought.
Canberra RSPCA chief executive officer Michael Linke said the warmer temperatures in northern Queensland created a different breeding season.
”Cats breed when it is hot, and they have been breeding all winter in far north Queensland, and there is an excess supply.”

Thus the RSPCA seems beholden to cat and dog owners, rather than the wider animal world.

GardeningGirl 11:45 am 27 Oct 10

I think the RSPCA do good work.
I think it’s fair enough to ask questions when an organisation extends one hand to give you a trinket you didn’t particularly want and extends the other hand for a donation.
(As an aside I have to say I’m over the fundraising day novelty items that charities sell anyway. I’ve got a hoard of them. Maybe the idea is to chuck them out annually when you buy the new one? Not sure about the wisdom of that especially in these environmentally conscious times. On the other hand we’ve bought RSPCA caps, ongoing usefulness for us, and profit and advertising for them, that seems more sensible all round.)
I have worked in a charity office (not RSPCA) and I think it can be genuinely helpful to remind organisations what they’re supposed to be focussing on. It doesn’t need to be intentional to end up being wasteful.
If it was a government department instead of a warm fuzzy cute animal charity I’m sure no-one would feel asking questions is “cynical nitpicking”.
If businesses donate to charities then why can’t they donate useful things. Stationary for use in the organisation’s office is worthwhile, things to give away as freebies not so much.
Two cents per unit still adds up, look after the pennies and all that.
I also can’t shake the feeling that what is a cheap trinket here is a river full of pollution in its place of manufacture, even more so since watching Foreign Correspondent last night.
There are more worthwhile organisations and causes than I can help, so why shouldn’t I give some thought to my choices?

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