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Singapore Airlines CBR direct flights are go

By Charlotte Harper 20 January 2016 40

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Singapore Airlines chief executive Goh Choon Phong has this morning confirmed last week’s reports that the Asian carrier will introduce direct flights between Singapore and Canberra and Wellington and Canberra. Flights on the service, dubbed the ‘Capital Express’ will commence September 20, with tickets available from this Monday.

Billboard screen

As foreshadowed last week, there will be four weekly flights between Singapore and Canberra as well as return flights between Canberra and Wellington using the same planes, though they will be Boeing 777-200R planes rather than Airbus A330s as earlier reported.

The retrofitted 777-200 will feature 266 seats, with 38 of them business class and 228 economy.

Economy class fares will start from $650 all inclusive for CBR-SIN return (3166 for business class) and $469 all-inclusive for CBR-WLG return ($1450 for business class).

Signing of documents

Air Pacific operated direct flights to Fiji from Canberra for six months in 2004, but this is the first time the airport has hosted a regularly scheduled international service. It’s also the first time the Australian and New Zealand capital cities have been directly connected.

CAPITAL EXPRESS SCHEDULE (pre-daylight savings):
SQ291 Singapore-Canberra departing 11pm on Tuesday, Thursday, Saturday and Sunday, arriving 8.35am+1.
SQ291 Canberra-Wellington departing 9.50am on Monday, Wednesday, Friday and Sunday, arriving 3.05pm.
SQ292 Wellington-Canberra departing 8.15pm on Monday, Wednesday, Friday and Sunday, arriving 10.05pm.
SQ292 Canberra-Singapore departing 11.30pm on Monday, Wednesday, Friday and Sunday, arriving 5.50am+1.

More to come


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Singapore Airlines CBR direct flights are go
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1967 9:47 am 03 Feb 16

Of course,
Based on domestic flight pricing, it’ll still be 20 – 50% cheaper to catch a bus to Sydney then fly from there.

dungfungus 9:59 am 01 Feb 16

rubaiyat said :

HenryBG said :

drfelonious said :

When people start their sentences with ‘I’m not a racist, but….’ you don’t need to hear the rest of the sentence because it will simply prove the point that they are a racist.

Similarly, when people say ‘I’m not being negative, but….’ you can put the house on them being overly negative about change. The hallmark of conservatives everywhere is to reflexively oppose change without giving it any consideration. The current example is all of the old buggers handing out anti tram propaganda at shopping centres (if I ever see one under 60 years old, I might listen to his argument, and it is ALWAYS a ‘he’).

I’m not being a fan of Dungfungus, but the recently-signed free-trade agreement led to an analysis which showed that the net effects would be significant growth to NZ’s GDP and virtually nothing to Australia. Increasing connectivity between Australia and the rest of the world helps the rest of the world far more than it helps us.

Oh, I trust you will acknowledge your “I’m not X…” supposition is thus disproven?

How wrong can you get?

Our free trade agreement with NZ was our first and ONLY successful free trade agreement. Vastly to our advantage and not theirs.

And just what do we export to NZ?

dungfungus 1:08 pm 31 Jan 16

HenryBG said :

drfelonious said :

When people start their sentences with ‘I’m not a racist, but….’ you don’t need to hear the rest of the sentence because it will simply prove the point that they are a racist.

Similarly, when people say ‘I’m not being negative, but….’ you can put the house on them being overly negative about change. The hallmark of conservatives everywhere is to reflexively oppose change without giving it any consideration. The current example is all of the old buggers handing out anti tram propaganda at shopping centres (if I ever see one under 60 years old, I might listen to his argument, and it is ALWAYS a ‘he’).

I’m not being a fan of Dungfungus, but the recently-signed free-trade agreement led to an analysis which showed that the net effects would be significant growth to NZ’s GDP and virtually nothing to Australia. Increasing connectivity between Australia and the rest of the world helps the rest of the world far more than it helps us.

Oh, I trust you will acknowledge your “I’m not X…” supposition is thus disproven?

John Howard’s WorkChoices addressed the problems Australia now faces but the unions strangled any attempt for the coalition made to sell it. That was our last chance.
Whatever spin is put on Australia’s ability to compete globally is simply spin. Our cost of labour is unaffordable.

rubaiyat 12:42 pm 31 Jan 16

HenryBG said :

drfelonious said :

When people start their sentences with ‘I’m not a racist, but….’ you don’t need to hear the rest of the sentence because it will simply prove the point that they are a racist.

Similarly, when people say ‘I’m not being negative, but….’ you can put the house on them being overly negative about change. The hallmark of conservatives everywhere is to reflexively oppose change without giving it any consideration. The current example is all of the old buggers handing out anti tram propaganda at shopping centres (if I ever see one under 60 years old, I might listen to his argument, and it is ALWAYS a ‘he’).

I’m not being a fan of Dungfungus, but the recently-signed free-trade agreement led to an analysis which showed that the net effects would be significant growth to NZ’s GDP and virtually nothing to Australia. Increasing connectivity between Australia and the rest of the world helps the rest of the world far more than it helps us.

Oh, I trust you will acknowledge your “I’m not X…” supposition is thus disproven?

How wrong can you get?

Our free trade agreement with NZ was our first and ONLY successful free trade agreement. Vastly to our advantage and not theirs.

rubaiyat 12:40 pm 31 Jan 16

dungfungus said :

rubaiyat said :

dungfungus said :

Ryoma said :

I am very happy to hear that this is going ahead, and I agree with other comments that many people will be happy to avoid Sydney Airport. And having Singapore Airlines doing the link will mean that Canberra gets promoted in countries currently unware of it.

Something else that I don’t think the general public has picked up on (beyond the tourism aspect) is that all of the planes SQ will be fliying have cargo holds. As a result, it will be possible for local exporters to air freight goods for export. This could be especially useful to any products needing freshness such as food, fresh flowers, or the like. And of course the reverse is true too, from both Singapore and NZ. In any case, it should help to promote trade on a broader scale in both directions.

I can’t think of any locally produced foods that could be exported and our supermarkets are already awash with “fresh” flowers from Singapore.
NZ exports an increasing amount of fruit and veg to Australia so I don’t see any opportunity to export there either.
No, I am not being negative, simply realistic.

If there is a possibility it will turn into a probability, without the first you don’t get to the second.

Possible examples, please?

Entire human existence, evolution, the universe?

That do you for starters?

HenryBG 9:08 am 30 Jan 16

drfelonious said :

When people start their sentences with ‘I’m not a racist, but….’ you don’t need to hear the rest of the sentence because it will simply prove the point that they are a racist.

Similarly, when people say ‘I’m not being negative, but….’ you can put the house on them being overly negative about change. The hallmark of conservatives everywhere is to reflexively oppose change without giving it any consideration. The current example is all of the old buggers handing out anti tram propaganda at shopping centres (if I ever see one under 60 years old, I might listen to his argument, and it is ALWAYS a ‘he’).

I’m not being a fan of Dungfungus, but the recently-signed free-trade agreement led to an analysis which showed that the net effects would be significant growth to NZ’s GDP and virtually nothing to Australia. Increasing connectivity between Australia and the rest of the world helps the rest of the world far more than it helps us.

Oh, I trust you will acknowledge your “I’m not X…” supposition is thus disproven?

dungfungus 8:42 am 30 Jan 16

rubaiyat said :

dungfungus said :

Ryoma said :

I am very happy to hear that this is going ahead, and I agree with other comments that many people will be happy to avoid Sydney Airport. And having Singapore Airlines doing the link will mean that Canberra gets promoted in countries currently unware of it.

Something else that I don’t think the general public has picked up on (beyond the tourism aspect) is that all of the planes SQ will be fliying have cargo holds. As a result, it will be possible for local exporters to air freight goods for export. This could be especially useful to any products needing freshness such as food, fresh flowers, or the like. And of course the reverse is true too, from both Singapore and NZ. In any case, it should help to promote trade on a broader scale in both directions.

I can’t think of any locally produced foods that could be exported and our supermarkets are already awash with “fresh” flowers from Singapore.
NZ exports an increasing amount of fruit and veg to Australia so I don’t see any opportunity to export there either.
No, I am not being negative, simply realistic.

If there is a possibility it will turn into a probability, without the first you don’t get to the second.

Possible examples, please?

dungfungus 8:41 am 30 Jan 16

drfelonious said :

When people start their sentences with ‘I’m not a racist, but….’ you don’t need to hear the rest of the sentence because it will simply prove the point that they are a racist.

Similarly, when people say ‘I’m not being negative, but….’ you can put the house on them being overly negative about change. The hallmark of conservatives everywhere is to reflexively oppose change without giving it any consideration. The current example is all of the old buggers handing out anti tram propaganda at shopping centres (if I ever see one under 60 years old, I might listen to his argument, and it is ALWAYS a ‘he’).

In the absence of you contributing anything positive I will have to accept that you agree with me that there is no likelihood of trade being promoted in both directions then?
Regarding your stereotyping of “old buggers handing out anti-tram propaganda” at shopping centres, just stop and think for a minute.
It was “old buggers” who invented the tram and we are not against trams generally but they will not be suitable for anywhere in Canberra for many years.
Old people like me have children like you and we are trying to protect you from paying for the tram folly for the rest of your working lives.
Experience tells us that we should not accept change for changes sake. You will gain experience and responsibility as you mature but I give you little hope of understanding the meaning of respect.
.

rubaiyat 4:03 am 30 Jan 16

dungfungus said :

Ryoma said :

I am very happy to hear that this is going ahead, and I agree with other comments that many people will be happy to avoid Sydney Airport. And having Singapore Airlines doing the link will mean that Canberra gets promoted in countries currently unware of it.

Something else that I don’t think the general public has picked up on (beyond the tourism aspect) is that all of the planes SQ will be fliying have cargo holds. As a result, it will be possible for local exporters to air freight goods for export. This could be especially useful to any products needing freshness such as food, fresh flowers, or the like. And of course the reverse is true too, from both Singapore and NZ. In any case, it should help to promote trade on a broader scale in both directions.

I can’t think of any locally produced foods that could be exported and our supermarkets are already awash with “fresh” flowers from Singapore.
NZ exports an increasing amount of fruit and veg to Australia so I don’t see any opportunity to export there either.
No, I am not being negative, simply realistic.

If there is a possibility it will turn into a probability, without the first you don’t get to the second.

drfelonious 7:32 pm 29 Jan 16

When people start their sentences with ‘I’m not a racist, but….’ you don’t need to hear the rest of the sentence because it will simply prove the point that they are a racist.

Similarly, when people say ‘I’m not being negative, but….’ you can put the house on them being overly negative about change. The hallmark of conservatives everywhere is to reflexively oppose change without giving it any consideration. The current example is all of the old buggers handing out anti tram propaganda at shopping centres (if I ever see one under 60 years old, I might listen to his argument, and it is ALWAYS a ‘he’).

dungfungus 5:41 pm 29 Jan 16

Ryoma said :

I am very happy to hear that this is going ahead, and I agree with other comments that many people will be happy to avoid Sydney Airport. And having Singapore Airlines doing the link will mean that Canberra gets promoted in countries currently unware of it.

Something else that I don’t think the general public has picked up on (beyond the tourism aspect) is that all of the planes SQ will be fliying have cargo holds. As a result, it will be possible for local exporters to air freight goods for export. This could be especially useful to any products needing freshness such as food, fresh flowers, or the like. And of course the reverse is true too, from both Singapore and NZ. In any case, it should help to promote trade on a broader scale in both directions.

I can’t think of any locally produced foods that could be exported and our supermarkets are already awash with “fresh” flowers from Singapore.
NZ exports an increasing amount of fruit and veg to Australia so I don’t see any opportunity to export there either.
No, I am not being negative, simply realistic.

Ryoma 11:24 am 29 Jan 16

I am very happy to hear that this is going ahead, and I agree with other comments that many people will be happy to avoid Sydney Airport. And having Singapore Airlines doing the link will mean that Canberra gets promoted in countries currently unware of it.

Something else that I don’t think the general public has picked up on (beyond the tourism aspect) is that all of the planes SQ will be fliying have cargo holds. As a result, it will be possible for local exporters to air freight goods for export. This could be especially useful to any products needing freshness such as food, fresh flowers, or the like. And of course the reverse is true too, from both Singapore and NZ. In any case, it should help to promote trade on a broader scale in both directions.

Kim F 4:56 pm 26 Jan 16

Ahh, they have changed the free tour since my wife did it. You do now clear customs but I still think there is not much foot action

Kim F 4:16 pm 26 Jan 16

If your transit stop in Singapore is 6 hours or over, you can do the free Singapore city tour, courtesy of the airport. Tour takes 2.5 hours but you are not allowed to get off the bus anywhere as you don’t actually clear Immigration and CUstoms

aronde 1:17 pm 26 Jan 16

JC said :

dungfungus said :

A four hour wait at Changi is a big turn-off for economy class travellers who are travelling beyond Singapore.

Exactly my point, there is one reason people MAY choose other carriers. But as mentioned there could be worse places to be. For any long waits in Changi, I just walk the terminals for some exercise. I can walk T3-T1-T2 in about 45-60 minutes.

I would prefer a four hour wait in Changi compared to a transfer the international terminal in Sydney then a massive queue at immigration and then another stopover somewhere else on the way to London for instance. I also like to have a bit of a gap between flights to allow for the late arrival of our first flight and to be able to get off the plane for a while and stretch out before continuing. We have spent many hours at Changhi with our young kids and we have never had any trouble passing the time. You can access playgrounds, a butterfly house, cinema, good food, shopping etc. Last time we even had little fish eat our feet at the spa and they loved it!

I think being able to avoid Sydney airport for international departures will be a major drawcard for these flights and not just with Canberrans, but many in the region.

dungfungus 11:23 am 26 Jan 16

JC said :

dungfungus said :

JC said :

dungfungus said :

A four hour wait at Changi is a big turn-off for economy class travellers who are travelling beyond Singapore.

Exactly my point, there is one reason people MAY choose other carriers. But as mentioned there could be worse places to be. For any long waits in Changi, I just walk the terminals for some exercise. I can walk T3-T1-T2 in about 45-60 minutes.

Would I be correct in saying that if one decided to fly from Canberra to Singapore and then catch a British Airways (my favourite) on to London they would have to exist the transit lounge, claim their baggage and queue up with the other BA passengers to board again?
I arrived in Frankfurt once without my luggage which was off-loaded at Vienna but not transferred to another airline despite the travel agent and airport personnel assuring me it would be.
I didn’t get the lost luggage for another two days and totally missed the conference (it was boring anyway I was told) and as compensation I was flown home first class (still have my monogrammed pyjamas).

By rights if both flights are on the same booking then SQ will transfer your bags to BA. If on separate bookings the accepting airline is within their rights to carry your bags as far as your transit point, SIN in this case. Though many will interline for you. Qantas however will only interline bags to other OneWorld carriers, and certain partner airlines, but not SQ (except if on the same booking)

So assuming your SQ and BA flights are on the same booking (or SQ interline to BA if separate) all you would need to do is get off the SQ flight (which will arrive at either terminal 2 or 3) then make your way to terminal 1 where BA leaves from (they use the pier closer to T3) go through security, which in SIN is at the gate then board. Luckily in Singapore all the terminals are connected so you can walk it, or get the transit train to speed things up.

That said in the example you gave you will have a long wait. The SQ CBR-SIN flight is due to arrive around 6am, and both BA flights to London, BA12 and BA16 don’t leave until around 11pm. Yes BA has two flights a day and both leave within half an hour of each other. So if BA is your fav, your probably better off flying to Sydney and get BA16 all the way from SYD-LHR via SIN. Or plan to do something in Singapore for the day.

Thanks for that JC.
Looks like I will stick to BA16 and transit from Canberra via Murrays Coaches.
Most grand announcements the current government make have a Mickey Mouse user outcome once they are analysed.

JC 10:34 am 26 Jan 16

Mess said :

British Airways and Singapore Airlines are two different alliances (Oneworld & Star Alliance) so they wouldn’t thru-check your luggage. If you went from say Singapore Airlines to Lufthansa, Swiss Air or another Star Alliance carrier then your bags would probably be checked through.

It is a bit more complex than that.

As mentioned above if your flights are all on the same booking, then the carrier accepting baggage is obliged to transfer your bags to your next carrier, regardless of alliance. The accepting airline is also the one responsible for getting your bag to your destination if it goes missing.

There are some get out for airlines, mostly relating to times between ‘connecting’ flights, think 24 hours is considered the maximum, and of course in countries like Australia when connecting from international to domestic, you must collect your baggage so that breaks the link anyway. Though many airlines will still through tag to domestic locations if on the same booking. But the accepting airline is not responsible for the bag after the break.

The accepting airline also needs to charge excess baggage charges if applicable and pass money onto subsequent airlines, hence the voucher system, though there are rules around which airlines baggage allowance is used.

Then of course some airlines despite not being in the same alliance have interline agreements. I am pretty certain Singapore and Qantas have one, but Thai and Qantas don’t for example. But if on the same booking it is not an issue anyway.

JC 12:31 am 26 Jan 16

dungfungus said :

JC said :

dungfungus said :

A four hour wait at Changi is a big turn-off for economy class travellers who are travelling beyond Singapore.

Exactly my point, there is one reason people MAY choose other carriers. But as mentioned there could be worse places to be. For any long waits in Changi, I just walk the terminals for some exercise. I can walk T3-T1-T2 in about 45-60 minutes.

Would I be correct in saying that if one decided to fly from Canberra to Singapore and then catch a British Airways (my favourite) on to London they would have to exist the transit lounge, claim their baggage and queue up with the other BA passengers to board again?
I arrived in Frankfurt once without my luggage which was off-loaded at Vienna but not transferred to another airline despite the travel agent and airport personnel assuring me it would be.
I didn’t get the lost luggage for another two days and totally missed the conference (it was boring anyway I was told) and as compensation I was flown home first class (still have my monogrammed pyjamas).

By rights if both flights are on the same booking then SQ will transfer your bags to BA. If on separate bookings the accepting airline is within their rights to carry your bags as far as your transit point, SIN in this case. Though many will interline for you. Qantas however will only interline bags to other OneWorld carriers, and certain partner airlines, but not SQ (except if on the same booking)

So assuming your SQ and BA flights are on the same booking (or SQ interline to BA if separate) all you would need to do is get off the SQ flight (which will arrive at either terminal 2 or 3) then make your way to terminal 1 where BA leaves from (they use the pier closer to T3) go through security, which in SIN is at the gate then board. Luckily in Singapore all the terminals are connected so you can walk it, or get the transit train to speed things up.

That said in the example you gave you will have a long wait. The SQ CBR-SIN flight is due to arrive around 6am, and both BA flights to London, BA12 and BA16 don’t leave until around 11pm. Yes BA has two flights a day and both leave within half an hour of each other. So if BA is your fav, your probably better off flying to Sydney and get BA16 all the way from SYD-LHR via SIN. Or plan to do something in Singapore for the day.

Mess 5:20 pm 25 Jan 16

dungfungus said :

JC said :

dungfungus said :

A four hour wait at Changi is a big turn-off for economy class travellers who are travelling beyond Singapore.

Exactly my point, there is one reason people MAY choose other carriers. But as mentioned there could be worse places to be. For any long waits in Changi, I just walk the terminals for some exercise. I can walk T3-T1-T2 in about 45-60 minutes.

Would I be correct in saying that if one decided to fly from Canberra to Singapore and then catch a British Airways (my favourite) on to London they would have to exist the transit lounge, claim their baggage and queue up with the other BA passengers to board again?
I arrived in Frankfurt once without my luggage which was off-loaded at Vienna but not transferred to another airline despite the travel agent and airport personnel assuring me it would be.
I didn’t get the lost luggage for another two days and totally missed the conference (it was boring anyway I was told) and as compensation I was flown home first class (still have my monogrammed pyjamas).

British Airways and Singapore Airlines are two different alliances (Oneworld & Star Alliance) so they wouldn’t thru-check your luggage. If you went from say Singapore Airlines to Lufthansa, Swiss Air or another Star Alliance carrier then your bags would probably be checked through.

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