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Skippy lovers keep the cull in court

By johnboy 12 June 2013 43

TAMS brings word that their cull remains tied up in the Following an ACT Civil and Administrative Tribunal (ACAT) hearing today, Territory and Municipal and won’t be heard until mid July.

Following an ACT Civil and Administrative Tribunal (ACAT) hearing today, Territory and Municipal Services will delay the commencement of the conservation cull. This is to allow time for the Tribunal to consider the merits of the Conservator’s decision to issue licences to Territory and Municipal Services for the purposes of undertaking a conservation cull of 1455 eastern grey kangaroos at seven reserves.

“It is important to understand that the outcome today was not about the science that supports the conservation cull,” said Daniel Iglesias, Director, ACT Parks and Conservation.

“The finding today established that the parties have standing for the Tribunal to hear the case for and against the issuing of the licences to undertake the conservation cull. The next hearing will be held on 8 and 9 July 2013.

With a pretty tight window to conduct the cull all the protestors need to do now is keep it in front of the tribunal.

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Skippy lovers keep the cull in court
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IrishPete 10:39 pm 20 Jun 13

MrBigEars said :

Or, knowing the likely rate of re-invasion, keeping numbers low during the winter-spring protects the carrying capacity of reserve when feed is low. The kangaroo population then re-expands into the reserves from surrounding areas when the population increases, typically after better rainfall event. Kangaroo meta-population stable over time.

Complex systems with diverse drivers defy linear rationalising.
http://theconversation.com/common-sense-wont-help-you-understand-climate-11805

But kangaroo populations increase too slowly for it to be in the order you describe – rain comes, kangaroo population in surrounding areas increases, kangaroos move into culled areas. Based on the dates and populations provided, roos must be moving into the culled areas before the population in surrounding areas has a chance to increase significantly. Whether enough time has elapsed for the grassland and little critters to recover, I don’t know.

There remains the alternative explanation, that the counts are wrong.

IP

MrBigEars 8:47 am 20 Jun 13

IrishPete said :

From today’s Canberra Times letters page – says it all really. Either the CT is completely misreporting the “science”, or the “science” is really shoddy.

“Breeding misinformation

In the article ‘Roos bounce back after cull’ (June 15, p6) it is stated that, in 2008, 180 kangaroos were counted and 140 killed at Callum Brae. This would have left about 40 kangaroos with roughly equal numbers of males and females. Next year, the article states, there were 290 kangaroos in the reserve. This means that about 20 breeding females must have produced something like 12 or 13 joeys each! By 2011, according to figures in the article, the fantastic breeding rate had dropped to about seven joeys per female.

For those who might believe these figures, breeding females (and these are only a proportion of the females in a mob) produce only one joey per year and these don’t all survive.

It is this sort of ”evidence” that makes the necessity for the killing questionable.”

The obvious answer to me (if the counts are correct at all), is that after a cull roos are moving in from surrounding areas. If this is true, then having a cull in the ACT is completely pointless, like teaspooning water out of a dam and expecting the water level to go down where you are removing the water. To stop this happening, you would need to fence off the culled areas so no new roos can move in.

IP

Or, knowing the likely rate of re-invasion, keeping numbers low during the winter-spring protects the carrying capacity of reserve when feed is low. The kangaroo population then re-expands into the reserves from surrounding areas when the population increases, typically after better rainfall event. Kangaroo meta-population stable over time.

Complex systems with diverse drivers defy linear rationalising.
http://theconversation.com/common-sense-wont-help-you-understand-climate-11805

IrishPete 8:04 pm 19 Jun 13

From today’s Canberra Times letters page – says it all really. Either the CT is completely misreporting the “science”, or the “science” is really shoddy.

“Breeding misinformation

In the article ‘Roos bounce back after cull’ (June 15, p6) it is stated that, in 2008, 180 kangaroos were counted and 140 killed at Callum Brae. This would have left about 40 kangaroos with roughly equal numbers of males and females. Next year, the article states, there were 290 kangaroos in the reserve. This means that about 20 breeding females must have produced something like 12 or 13 joeys each! By 2011, according to figures in the article, the fantastic breeding rate had dropped to about seven joeys per female.

For those who might believe these figures, breeding females (and these are only a proportion of the females in a mob) produce only one joey per year and these don’t all survive.

It is this sort of ”evidence” that makes the necessity for the killing questionable.”

The obvious answer to me (if the counts are correct at all), is that after a cull roos are moving in from surrounding areas. If this is true, then having a cull in the ACT is completely pointless, like teaspooning water out of a dam and expecting the water level to go down where you are removing the water. To stop this happening, you would need to fence off the culled areas so no new roos can move in.

Of course the original numbers for the cull, leaked to the CT, proposed culling down to a population of 1 (yes, one) in some areas. You have to wonder what fool came up with that idea – not only cruel to the surviving roo, but it also can’t breed. (Or was it a tacit admission that roos are mobile?)

IP

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