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The crash at Pooh Corner

By johnboy 9 March 2009 49

The ABC brings word that two Canberra women (48 and 24 years old) have died descending Clyde Mountain.

Apparently the area was shrouded in rain and fog at the time.

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The crash at Pooh Corner
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benneh 9:18 am 13 Mar 09

This is a real shame these people died. Let’s just hope on the positive side, some awareness comes out of this, on how to properly drive in these kinds of conditions.

I think the crux of the issue, is that there is no mandatory requirement in getting your license to be taught how to drive in these kinds of conditions.

The number of times I have been driving on the clyde or brown, and you can smell someones breaks… you just know they have no idea how to properly use their gears to slow themselves down and are just riding their breaks. It’s an accident waiting to happen, even if the breaks don’t fail completely, they are going to be all spongy and inneffective when overused like that, and someone is going to loose control.

peterh 3:01 pm 11 Mar 09

at least the clyde is better than it was. In times past, you would have to call from the braidwood phone box to the steampacket hotel to check whether the road was clear, or if it was raining…. so my grandpa tells me.

Gungahlin Al 2:52 pm 11 Mar 09

caf said :

It’s quite possible to have a fatal accident at 60km/h closing speed.

The real live crash test (real driver – no dummies) at 30 mph and comparison of 3, 4 and 5 star wrecks on this week’s Top Gear was – to say the least – enlightening.

Emlyn Ward 2:48 pm 11 Mar 09

I remember when the Hume highway was “The Deadly Hume” – it was rubbish, just like the King’s Highway is now, with people dying on it all the time. In fact, I recall being in one accident where some old codger lost control on a (pretty moderate) bend and hit us head-on. Dunno what the “closing speed” was, but I’d guess it was at least 150km/h.
We took the brunt of it, but the traffic behind us ploughed into the wreckage, too.
The only real injuries were suffered by those people travelling behind us in horrible little pieces of jap-crap like Mazdas and Datsuns.

So – blame the drivers, blame the road, but don’t forget to also blame whoever has approved these horrible little unsafe asian-built cars for use on our roads.

caf 2:17 pm 11 Mar 09

It’s quite possible to have a fatal accident at 60km/h closing speed.

Emlyn Ward 2:15 pm 11 Mar 09

I don’t understand how an accident at Pooh Corner could be lethal – surely nobody’s travelling any more than about 30km/h around there?

I have to say – Macquarie Pass is much hairier than the Clyde, although with far less Canberra drivers on it, it’s usually less nerve-wracking.
I went down it 2 weeks ago and sure enough, there was the obligatory P-plater overtaking me on a blind 25km/h bend. He then crossed the double-yellow again to overtake the guy in front of me and arrived at the next bend (another 25km/h one) on the wrong side of the road and found himself nose-to-nose with a driver coming in the opposite direction.
If I’d had a gun on me, I’d have liked to have shot the #$@%, for all our sakes.

I-filed 1:52 pm 11 Mar 09

Was that the author and philosopher Genevieve Lloyd? Probably not, based on the age given in media reports …

PsydFX 1:27 pm 11 Mar 09

I wonder if a simple ad campaign would help reduce accidents on the Clyde by illustrating the point that VY made earlier – that drivers need to learn how to moderate their speed through gearing rather than overuse of the brake pedal.

Gobbo 11:58 am 11 Mar 09

Rest in peace Genevieve and Lauretta Lloyd.

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