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The March in March – protest against censorship goes to Parliament House

By johnboy 23 March 2009 50

[First filed: March 21, 2009 @ 18:56]

Protesting in the negative is a tricky, tricky thing. So at today’s protest against Labor’s plans, to end freedom of speech on the internet in this country, the speakers would often warn of horrendous possibilities, to wild applause.

On the other hand there was a large contingent of stunning blondes in shorts and white tank tops, so no-one really minded.

The crowd could have been bigger and there was an extremely unpleasant nutter there with her own agenda hurling abuse at people but when you’re protesting for free speech what are you going to do?

The above video has some of the better made points from the speakers, all condensed for your instant gratification.

August Winters has also done a much shorter video montage which you can check out on YouTube.

If you’re wondering why RiotACT is so passionate in its support of this cause it’s because as a small outlet which frequently says things government’s don’t like we see this proposed black box censorship as a direct threat. A faceless bureaucrat could cut us off in a moment with no means of appeal, or statement of reasons.

If you ever think it’s possible you might want to say something which upsets any future government, or read something which upsets any future government, you need to start joining in this nascent protest movement. This is serious stuff.

You can start by subscribing at the March In March website.

Slideshow below:

What’s Your opinion?


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The March in March – protest against censorship goes to Parliament House
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ant 5:05 pm 24 Mar 09

I was pretty sure than online gambling was already illegal? It’s just that enforcing it was “too hard”. I vaguely remember the gov’t canvassing whether they could choke the sites by making the CC companies refuse to give them money (which is how the US gov’t choked the russian mp3 sites).

Purpleax 4:49 pm 24 Mar 09

of course I meant to say poker online, not poker inline 🙂

Purpleax 4:48 pm 24 Mar 09

I could care less about the US.

I want to be able to play poker inline in Australia, and as far as I can see, this will be taken away from me!!

jakez 4:45 pm 24 Mar 09

Don’t get me wrong Purpleax, I absolutely agree with you that it is not right. I encourage all US citizens to engage in civil disobedience by gambling online (which I am sure is not hard even though it’s against the law).

Purpleax 4:40 pm 24 Mar 09

that doesnt make it right!!

It isn’t far off being overturned in the US as well.

Is there an actual Australian law prohibiting Online Poker? I dont know of any.

jakez 4:25 pm 24 Mar 09

Purpleax said :

Has anyone noticed that the proposed clean feed will also ban online poker?

Go to wikileaks.org and have a look – all the major poker sites are included in the banned URL list!!!!

pokerstars, fulltilt – all gone if this thing goes forward. grr

Online gambling has been banned in the US for a while now actually Purpleax. I’m shocked it hasn’t happened here sooner.

Purpleax 4:15 pm 24 Mar 09

Has anyone noticed that the proposed clean feed will also ban online poker?

Go to wikileaks.org and have a look – all the major poker sites are included in the banned URL list!!!!

pokerstars, fulltilt – all gone if this thing goes forward. grr

p1 6:24 pm 23 Mar 09

I think that it is sad that on a subject totally concerned with a specific media, which has resulted in vigorous and passionate debate (by any fair measure) within that media, people would think that protest and publicity in a totally different media should be necessary for the elected representative to take notice.

I am not saying I don’t think this is the case, just that it is $hit.

jakez 1:09 pm 23 Mar 09

I went with three of my mates. All in all I found it disappointing. The crowd numbers were low, the thing seemed a little unprofessional, and although I get the whole ‘internet culture’ part of it, there are only so many times you can play Rick Astley before it isn’t funny.

I think someone above may have made a good point about this protests natural constituency not being inclined to go to a physical protest. However, there were the ‘Anonymous’ protests against Scientology all over the globe though.

I thought the speeches were a little unpolished. I did not find Patten compelling and having secured a policy platform of the Sex Party I can finally write them off. They have some great ideas but they have some truly abhorrent policies as well (gender based quotas in the Senate being an example). The VP of EFA was probably the best speaker.

I don’t know how speakers got on the bill but I was disappointed that the Liberal Democratic Party didn’t take the opportunity to put up a stall (as the Sex Party did).

The whole thing struck me as a little too /b/tard. Don’t get me wrong, I love b just as much as the next pervert who lives in his parents basement, but when the goal is political action, professionalism is a must.

As Thumper also said, it was not advertised enough.

I guess if I could sum up my thoughts I would say that the protest couldn’t decide exactly what it wanted to be. It’s lack of direction was a negative.

All of the things I have said though are from the mouth of an armchair quarterback who has never organised a protest himself. This issue is very important and I’ll still be working hard to knock this thing out.

Grail 12:48 pm 23 Mar 09

@alice27 – now I understand the costumes. I was too shy to approach you in person and ask about your message, but you did add a pleasant brightness to the occasion 🙂

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