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The Ruddnet impact on TransACT?

By johnboy - 8 April 2009 59

The Liberal’s Senator Humphries is up in arms that Kevin Rudd is proposing to create a new Telstra just to deliver high speed internet direct to every home.

The problem? Canberra’s own TransACT is also going to be made redundant.

Apparently TransACT are right now in the middle of rolling out more fibre (but only to the node), which is going to look a little silly if this new thing arrives.

However I do love Gary taking a swing at a government assuming the risk of running a data network when he was part of the Carnell Government which kicked off the TransACT data network. Surely they’re just scaling that good idea up?

TransACT in turn have expressed disappointment, and a hope they can still be part of the new plans.

What’s Your opinion?


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59 Responses to
The Ruddnet impact on TransACT?
Ozhair 3:31 pm 08 Apr 09

But then, what’s the point of creating a super-fast broadband network if you then impose a mandatory filtering system that slows it all back down again? 😛

Grrrr 3:15 pm 08 Apr 09

adamthebastard said :

“Apparently TransACT are right now in the middle of rolling out more fibre (but only to the node)” – not true. New suburbs are getting FTTP.

..

dosomethinguseful said :

would you rather jump on the brand new 100kmph mutli-lane highway?

I will definatley be jumping on that highway (even if it has a toll)

As someone looking to live in Forde in a few months, I can tell you the toll for TransACT FTTH (FTTP, if you like) is rather high. It’s probably due to the fact that there is no copper in the suburb, leaving your choices as TransACT FTTH .. or wireless. TransACT want $55 for ADSL2 speeds, with NO data and a choice of meh ISPs (not including iiNet, who funnily enough have rather expensive TransACT plans – even compared to their ADSL2 plans.) $123 if you’d actually like to be faster than ADSL2+ .. eek!

TransACT are uncompetitive. For the second time in their history, they have already rolled out a technology that the rest of the country is way behind on. For the second time, they’re failing to use that to become market leaders. I’m looking forward to them selling off their fibre, or having a competitor in the street. I’d rather the former, but either way has to be better than today.

adamthebastard said :

TansACT is understandably pissed off that the Govt shifted the gaol posts after TransACT had spent a bucket of money on the tender for a FTTN network, which would probably be a lot like the majority of TransACT’s network. If they wanted FTTP why didn’t they ask for it?

The government didn’t want FTTN or FTTP. What brought the NBN bid on was Telstra declaring they were going to turn the copper network into FTTN, disconnecting maybe 80% of lines from exchanges and connecting them to Telstra-only Nodes. This means that Telstra’s ADSL competitors would lose access to all but 20% of their customers. Which the competitors got upset about and demanded the govt do something.

So, the last govt issued the NBN tender .. and now the current govt has finally realised that FTTH is vastly superior to Fibre-to-400m-from-your-house, and a much better way forward. The FTTH will cost a lot more than the NBN people had in mind, but the bandwidth of Fibre is several orders of magnitude higher than an old copper pair, so it’s worth it.

johnboy said :

In my experience the latency in those japanese connections is quite high though.

For a lot of internet use well configured dial up was actually snappier.

But once you start streaming audio and video it’s out of sight.

You’re saying Japan has high latency, but high throughput (good streaming video.) That doesn’t really make sense .. one usually precludes the other.

Japanese broadband is mostly FTTB – Fibre to the Basement of apartment buildings, or FTTN in less-dense areas. Then from the end of the fibre it’s Japan’s own proprietary flavour of VDSL to the home. VDSL is what TransACT use in Phase 1 areas – it’s just like ADSL, but faster, and has a shorter reach. The latency is just as low, or lower – approx 2 orders of magnitude less latency than dial-up.

Japan is just as physically close to the rest of the internet as Australia, so speed-of-light considerations would have little to do with any latency issues you saw. They’re also better connected with International links than Australia.

My own 1st (and 2nd) hand experiences of Japanese broadband are of low latency and high speed – absolutely nothing like dialup in any regard. I can only suggest you were visiting busy web sites, or using a slow PC. Japan’s broadband is great. Australia’s will be better than Japan’s is now. Hopefully we don’t implement with too many delays or poor quality solution, or theirs might still be way ahead of ours once the FTTH is in!

harvyk1 2:57 pm 08 Apr 09

As far as I’m concerned nothing was set in stone for TransACT. You go to tender knowing it may not be you who wins it. At all stages of the game there was a chance that the contract could have been awarded to Optus (or Telstra) only and that would have caused them the same problems as they now have.

If I where them I’d be more pissed that the government went to Tender, and yet changed their mind to build Ruddnet (BTW Love the name) themselves.

dosomethinguseful 2:10 pm 08 Apr 09

Sammy said :

It’s a bit like rolling out a new single-lane road from Canberra to Nelligen, and then the Government comes along and builds a new multi-lane highway from Canberra to Batemans Bay.

Exactly. Would you rather continue driving on that 24kmph(if you’re lucky) single-lane road that was built 20years ago that gets a slight upgrade every now and then?

Or would you rather jump on the brand new 100kmph mutli-lane highway?

I will definatley be jumping on that highway (even if it has a toll)

johnboy 2:01 pm 08 Apr 09

In my experience the latency in those japanese connections is quite high though.

For a lot of internet use well configured dial up was actually snappier.

But once you start streaming audio and video it’s out of sight.

Mr Waffle 1:58 pm 08 Apr 09

TransACT are already redundant aren’t they?

Not to those of us trapped in the ADSL black hole that is the north, thanks to Telstra cutting corners when setting up the Crace exchange all those years ago. Transact is the only realistic broadband we can get…

I love the name “Ruddnet”, by the way. Even if I think the whole thing is a farce and will be stuffed up beyond belief. Bringing Australia into line with places like Japan, were they practically give away 50mbps connections? Hah…

monomania 1:49 pm 08 Apr 09

I don’t believe the costing of this scheme. It will end up as a huge money pit. Australian governments have trouble running themselves, let alone businesses.

When it is up and running will it be able to compete with existing infrastructure that will be able to cherry pick customers and provide services to those not needing high speed? Will it be carrying the extra burden of providing services to country areas or will the taxpayer be expected to pick that up?

Holden Caulfield 1:24 pm 08 Apr 09

TransACT are already redundant aren’t they?

I remember looking into them a few years ago when we moved to inner North. They sent someone out, who expected me to sign on the spot. Assuming I did sign up, it was going to take a further six weeks for someone to come and see if they actually could connect our house to their service (non-existant roof access, solid internal walls were posing some problems). If they could, they advised it would be another 3-4 weeks to have us connected.

Three days later Internode had sent me an ADSL modem and I was online.

Even then, Internode’s basic ADSL speeds were better than TransACT (IIRC), now with ADSL2+ how does TransACT even compete in the suburbs that can get ADSL2+ (yeah I know there’s not many)?

Sammy 1:15 pm 08 Apr 09

It’s a bit like rolling out a new single-lane road from Canberra to Nelligen, and then the Government comes along and builds a new multi-lane highway from Canberra to Batemans Bay.

Spam Box 1:05 pm 08 Apr 09

dosomethinguseful said :

TransACT should just sell their current fibre to Rudd to be part of his NBN with the condition that get paid to complete the full FTTH rollout to the ACT.

Something very similar to that is exactly what will happen

dosomethinguseful 12:59 pm 08 Apr 09

TransACT should just sell their current fibre to Rudd to be part of his NBN with the condition that get paid to complete the full FTTH rollout to the ACT.

AG Canberra 12:42 pm 08 Apr 09

I don’t think TransACT will be redundant – as the infrastructure they already have in place will be able to do the same job….won’t it?

It just means that they can bid to roll it out in the ‘burbs that they haven’t already got to…

adamthebastard 12:33 pm 08 Apr 09

“Apparently TransACT are right now in the middle of rolling out more fibre (but only to the node)” – not true. New suburbs are getting FTTP.

http://transact.com.au/packages/fordeandfranklin/default.aspx

TansACT is understandably pissed off that the Govt shifted the gaol posts after TransACT had spent a bucket of money on the tender for a FTTN network, which would probably be a lot like the majority of TransACT’s network. If they wanted FTTP why didn’t they ask for it?

Either way I like the current proposal for RuddNet, I just hope when it is sold off it is regulated as an infrastructure provider only and services are provided by third parties.

V twin venom 12:29 pm 08 Apr 09

Perhaps the new Ruddnet will be able to provide what TransACT can’t. Service.

trickster 12:25 pm 08 Apr 09

Good riddance I say. Their business model doesn’t work, they’re plans are uncompetitive, they certainly can’t run an ISP (Grapevine).

Bring on the Ruddernet.

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