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This is not charity. Dumping in Canberra

By thisisnotcharity 28 December 2011 137

dumping

On the afternoon of Tuesday, 28 December 2011, I went to the Southlands (Mawson) charity bins to donate some clothes to charity by placing them in the bins. Found a disgraceful mess. Ended up taking clothes home. Had camera with me, and decided to take some pics. Decided to visit other charity bins and charity stores around Canberra that afternoon.

This website is the result. http://thisisnotcharity.weebly.com/

I’m no web designer, so please don’t laugh. The images speak volumes, in more ways than one.

It would be greatly appreciated if you would get this website out there. Please post it to your Facebook account, your Twitter account, everywhere and anywhere. I give you permission to do that. I also give you permission to identify “thisisnotcharity” as the rightful owner of the pics. Mind you, if you wish, you can always take your own images, as the rubbish is there for all to see. Perhaps the mess has now been cleaned up now (a day later), but no doubt there will be other opportunities for more pics.

Thank you.

http://thisisnotcharity.weebly.com/

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137 Responses to
This is not charity. Dumping in Canberra
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TheDancingDjinn 7:11 pm 07 Feb 12

Sorry to revive an oldy, but last night as i pulled up to Kippax shopping centre i seen 3 large men scraping up the soiled and wrecked stuff that had been dumped onto the ground in front of the bins at the top of the woolies carpark. They were nice guys, saying hello to me as i got out of my car – when i was returning not even 5 minutes later, there were police around the men and their truck. Someone had called the police, and told them something so serious was happening that the police thought it was needed to bring 2 cars to the car park. Now i couldn’t for the life of me think why the hell anyone would call the police on them?, are we following suit from America and calling the police on people who have a full coverage of tan to their skin? ( these 3 men happened to be of darker complexion) Even if they weren’t there by order of charity – they were scraping up stuff with old smelly water running from it.. i don’t think they are getting money from this? and if they are who cares? its rubbish, if you thought it was worth something you wouldn’t have left it on the ground in a carpark in Holt.

fgzk 11:47 am 09 Jan 12

Thisisnotcharity Nice site. Have you thought of taking the concept one step further. Rubbish Geocaching. A site we can send in pics / locations of dumped rubbish and monitor its removal.

I like the idea of a bounty, paid by the government out of fines, for identifying dumpers. Dumper trapping.

fgzk 11:38 am 09 Jan 12

I will be voting for Allah’s laws. They punish the community more.

dungfungus said :

Forget about our ACT Government ever prosecuting anyone dumping rubbish; it has never happened. Neither have they ever fined cyclists for riding acroos pedestrian crossings or fined anyone for not picking up dog poop. Probably lots of other quirky little laws out there that can attract a fine but I’ll bet there has never been one issued or anybody prosecuted.
The only way to stop the dumping at “charity bins” is to remove them – then the ferals that need to continue the practice can go back to dumping their excess rubbish at the Mugga Lane tip gates in the dead of night as they used to do. At least this centralises the problem.
At the election this October I will be voting for whoever pledges to start running the ACT like a regular community with standard council services and also undertakes to start enforcing the penalties that apply to ALL laws that are broken.

nicnacvb 11:26 am 09 Jan 12

If we want hard waste collection, perhaps the charities could take away the bins for a while and then the usual suspects would continue to dump their rubbish where they please, but it would be the ACT Govt that has to deal with it all.

They might finally realise that it will be cheaper for them to do hard waste collection than go around picking up peoples rubbish in random locations across the ACT. (Note that I have reported illegal dumping several times to the ACT Govt and they are always prompt in collecting it).

Once we have hard waste collection the charities could put the bins back and surely they would see a reduction in the number of CRT TV’s, furniture, other household crap etc. Surely the bogans would rather have their crap collected from home than actually have to drive it somewhere.

Just an idea, but you would have to get the charities on board.

dungfungus 11:24 am 09 Jan 12

Forget about our ACT Government ever prosecuting anyone dumping rubbish; it has never happened. Neither have they ever fined cyclists for riding acroos pedestrian crossings or fined anyone for not picking up dog poop. Probably lots of other quirky little laws out there that can attract a fine but I’ll bet there has never been one issued or anybody prosecuted.
The only way to stop the dumping at “charity bins” is to remove them – then the ferals that need to continue the practice can go back to dumping their excess rubbish at the Mugga Lane tip gates in the dead of night as they used to do. At least this centralises the problem.
At the election this October I will be voting for whoever pledges to start running the ACT like a regular community with standard council services and also undertakes to start enforcing the penalties that apply to ALL laws that are broken.

watto23 10:01 am 09 Jan 12

I’d like to think the recycling centres are not used for dumps too, but they clearly are at times. Are there CCTV’s there? If there are CCTV’s and they actually prosecute people, then maybe putting charity bins inside the recycling centres could work? I still think we need more recycling centres also.

Just make it a little more convenient to do the right thing, then those who don’t, clearly are extremely lazy and should be prosecuted.

thisisnotcharity 8:34 am 09 Jan 12

smeeagain said :

I went past the bins at Kippax on Thursday and there was “crap” extending at least 8 feet in front of the bins. No way could you have put anything into the actual bins without going mountain climbing. I saw the guys there clearing it all away on Friday, but yesterday, there was heaps of stuff piled outside them again.

Alternatively, put all the bins into compounds where there is CCTV

When asked about it, they simply replied “Poor people deserve nice things too”

Yes, this has been happening since I started my website too – the pictures tell the story. Mawson and Gungahlin the worst I been to. Oceans of rubbish, then cleaned up, then dumping starts again.

Your idea of compounds with CCTV is a good one, but I believe it would in effect turn into another tip. 95% of the stuff I’ve photograhed (hundreds images on website) is actual rubbish.

Yes, poor people deserve nice things too. I like that, thanks for posting.

thisisnotcharity 8:29 am 09 Jan 12

Fuzzy said :

thisisnotcharity said :

The charities employ workers in a big truck to go collect. I came across two workers for the Lone Fathers Association charity bins at Wanniassa just aftr Christmas, when I started this website, and they just collect the stuff without sorting, and “it all goes to the tip” – in their words. If it’s contaminated with household garbage, it cannot be used.

Is this the case for the genuine donations also? I regularly pop a few bags of outgrown children’s clothes into Lone Fathers’ bins (yes, INTO, I won’t say where or the situation might change, but there are some donation locations that don’t get dumping) but if they’re not genuinely using them, I’d rather give them away on Facebook, Gumtree etc.

and remember, as my 300+ pics highlight, most of the stuff left outside of the bins is rubbish.

thisisnotcharity 8:28 am 09 Jan 12

Fuzzy said :

thisisnotcharity said :

The charities employ workers in a big truck to go collect. I came across two workers for the Lone Fathers Association charity bins at Wanniassa just aftr Christmas, when I started this website, and they just collect the stuff without sorting, and “it all goes to the tip” – in their words. If it’s contaminated with household garbage, it cannot be used.

Is this the case for the genuine donations also? I regularly pop a few bags of outgrown children’s clothes into Lone Fathers’ bins (yes, INTO, I won’t say where or the situation might change, but there are some donation locations that don’t get dumping) but if they’re not genuinely using them, I’d rather give them away on Facebook, Gumtree etc.

Absolutely not, only stuff left outside of the bins is at risk of being taken to the tip. The stuff inside the bins is sorted and used appropriately.

GardeningGirl 8:07 pm 08 Jan 12

Seems to me there’s a number of overlapping problems, the people who don’t care and whose attitude towards charity bins is probably only part of their antisocial behaviour, the wasteful and inefficient system the charities are currently operating, the shortcomings of the government’s attempts to minimise what’s going into landfill

Horrible story murraythecat. 🙁

Genie’s got the beginnings of an idea. See that’s what’s needed, a few new ideas. Make the system work better for the people who want to see their stuff find an appropriate new home and decrese opportunities/increase penalties for the people who just don’t care.

I don’t think charities only being interested in money-making goods in order to fund their trips to the tip makes sense and I don’t think letting them dump it for free makes sense either, in fact it might make the problem worse.

dungfungus 2:12 pm 08 Jan 12

The Antichrist said :

thisisnotcharity said :

……… but ultimately, it’s the dumpers that need to start “caring” about their actions……….

Time to wake up and smell the roses. These clowns are dumpers because they don’t care and never will. They are not going to wake up and change their habits, no matter how much we all would like them to.

While ever there are charity ‘bins’ in the ‘burbs – there will be lazy dumpers dumping.

This problem will become a lot worse, once the charities are no longer paying tip fees ! The dumping problem will probably multiply 10-fold overnight.

Get rid of the bins altogether – its the only answer. Anyone who wants to take the time to donate stuff to the charities, will take the time to drive to a proper collection point anyway.

thisisnotcharity said :

……… but ultimately, it’s the dumpers that need to start “caring” about their actions……….

I agree with The Antichrist 100% – and the space liberated will provide more car parking spaces. It is about time someone made a comment that faces the realities of human behaviour.

The Antichrist 12:16 pm 08 Jan 12

thisisnotcharity said :

……… but ultimately, it’s the dumpers that need to start “caring” about their actions……….

Time to wake up and smell the roses. These clowns are dumpers because they don’t care and never will. They are not going to wake up and change their habits, no matter how much we all would like them to.

While ever there are charity ‘bins’ in the ‘burbs – there will be lazy dumpers dumping.

This problem will become a lot worse, once the charities are no longer paying tip fees ! The dumping problem will probably multiply 10-fold overnight.

Get rid of the bins altogether – its the only answer. Anyone who wants to take the time to donate stuff to the charities, will take the time to drive to a proper collection point anyway.

smeeagain 11:12 am 08 Jan 12

I went past the bins at Kippax on Thursday and there was “crap” extending at least 8 feet in front of the bins. No way could you have put anything into the actual bins without going mountain climbing. I saw the guys there clearing it all away on Friday, but yesterday, there was heaps of stuff piled outside them again. From previous experience, as fast as they collect stuff from these bins, more is left. As soon as there is one item on the footpath, people seem to assume that the bins are full, so don’t even check and just dump more stuff on the ground.

Personally, I think some of the organisations have more bins than they have volunteers to be able to cover in a timely manner. They should probably remove some of them so they can make more frequent collections at their “profitable” sites (ie, good items donated, without all the crap dumped” rather than just having as many bins out at as many sites as possible.

Alternatively, put all the bins into compounds where there is CCTV, or further away from carparks so big heavy items can’t just be dragged out the back of a car and dumped on the sidewalk.

On another note, when my brother was moving house (interstate, but still relevant regarding charities) they had a garage sale. The first people through the door were from Salvos. They walked around, pointed out all the nice furniture and electrical items and said “we’ll take that, that and that. Can we pick it up at the end of the day please?” They didn’t argue about the price at all.

When asked about it, they simply replied “Poor people deserve nice things too”

It was a win win situation for my brother. They returned at the end of the day, picked up all the items they had purchased, and also took the items that my brother hadn’t managed to sell.

murraythecat 10:19 am 08 Jan 12

Genie said :

I will still also note on how greedy I consider charities to be lately.. they only want top end donations that they can SELL for a premium. What happened to the days when the clothes/furniture/manchester etc people donated went straight to the needy instead of straight to the shelves for a profit .

I don’t understand this line of thought. Yes most of the centres are staffed by volunteers, but these charities do have paid staff as well, and gasp shock horror, costs to cover (duh like taking illegally dumped stuff to the tip, if not wages, then there is still costs like vehicle costs, fuel etc). I have no probs with them making a bit of money, after all they do A LOT more work in the community than just sell stuff to the needy. If they can sell my stuff for a premium, I say good on them, and I am pretty sure that as registered charities, if they do make a bit of money, it most certainly is not “profit”.

taninaus said :

watto23 said :

Weren’t tip fees to help encourage recycling, I know there is a handy recycling waste dropoff point in tuggeranong, but maybe more of these sites, would help as well? Of course people dump crap here also, but CCTV at these sites could surely be warranted.

If more people knew about Freecycle and the like they might put the same effort they do into dumping the old TV into finding it a new home. I have had another 3 successful give aways this weekend to people who wanted the items I no longer needed. But I do agree about the comment about e-waste – the cost of $30-50 is a huge disincentive for any of us to do the right thing. I totally get why people choose other ways to get rid of these – wrong or not.

Yes and no. From a NSW perspective, yes Queanbeyan City Council (fantastic council) does have a “bring out your dead day” (kerbside collection), twice a year I think, and there is also a good recycling facility. IMHO the ppl who dump stuff are basically just lazy and inconsiderate, and no amount of incentives will change that. Freecycle is a great idea, but really, isn’t it just easier to drop your shit off at a charity bin, then it becomes someone else problem. Outa sight, outa mind & all that. And I did see in one of your pic, Tuggers I think, a Jerrabomberra school uniform. just goes to show that a supposedly “good” suburb still has lazy lazy ppl.

Fuzzy 10:05 am 08 Jan 12

thisisnotcharity said :

The charities employ workers in a big truck to go collect. I came across two workers for the Lone Fathers Association charity bins at Wanniassa just aftr Christmas, when I started this website, and they just collect the stuff without sorting, and “it all goes to the tip” – in their words. If it’s contaminated with household garbage, it cannot be used.

Is this the case for the genuine donations also? I regularly pop a few bags of outgrown children’s clothes into Lone Fathers’ bins (yes, INTO, I won’t say where or the situation might change, but there are some donation locations that don’t get dumping) but if they’re not genuinely using them, I’d rather give them away on Facebook, Gumtree etc.

thisisnotcharity 8:39 am 08 Jan 12

puggy said :

Genie said :

I recently couldn’t give away a washing machine and old couches to any charity because they were “too old” but it took me all of an hour to sell them online for less than $50 each.

You have some fair points, but you’ve given yourself a solution. Charity or not, they need to cover costs – and there are costs in giving away free goods, whatever you may think. If you can get rid of your stuff for $50 in 60 minutes, then that’s the way to do it.

Yes, people need to take more responsibility for disposing of their own items.

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