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Two mobile phones for the win!

johnboy 1 September 2011 43

A 26-year-old Braddon man has been caught driving using two mobile phones while using his knees to steer.

About 11.10am on Wednesday, August 24, a Traffic Operations member saw the man driving along Ginninderra Drive, near Bruce, holding two mobile phones and using his knees to steer the car.

When the police officer stopped him, the man said he was putting his wife’s phone number from one phone into the other.

The man was issued with a $271 fine and the loss of three demerit points.

Acting Officer-in-Charge of Traffic Operations, Sergeant Jason Kennedy, said that using one mobile phone while driving is bad enough, add another phone and then driving with your knees is a recipe for disaster.

“We put out these media releases to inform the public of what some motorists are doing on our roads which is a risk to other road users,” Sergeant Kennedy said.

ACT Policing has issued 276 Traffic Infringement Notices to motorists for using a mobile phone while driving in the past month (August 1 to 31) as part of its ongoing traffic campaign.

Police will continue to target mobile phones for the month of September.

[Courtesy ACT Policing]


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Two mobile phones for the win!
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Innovation 8:52 pm 02 Sep 11

PBO said :

I would be more interested in why he was using 2 phones in the first place, It is a very small demographic that make a regular habit of carrying 2 phones.

New phone and old phone (to be superseded once numbers are transferred to new phone)

screaming banshee 6:11 pm 02 Sep 11

PBO said :

I would be more interested in why he was using 2 phones in the first place, It is a very small demographic that make a regular habit of carrying 2 phones.

Work phone and personal phone….next.

johnboy 9:05 am 02 Sep 11

Jethro said :

Jono said :

ImagineThat said :

… and not coming to a complete stop at a stop sign ….

OK. I’ll bite. What’s the difference between coming to a stop, and coming to a “complete stop”? The first means that you’re no longer moving. Presumably the second means that you’re really, really not moving?

I believe the following clip explains it.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=McW1wykqins

Took the words right out of my mouth.

Chop71 9:03 am 02 Sep 11

bad luck buddy

PBO 8:57 am 02 Sep 11

I would be more interested in why he was using 2 phones in the first place, It is a very small demographic that make a regular habit of carrying 2 phones.

luther_bendross 8:41 am 02 Sep 11

bugmenot said :

And for the physicists in the room…
Are we ever truly stopped?

From the Australian Road Rules*:
“A vehicle must come to a complete stop, where the complete stop is defined by a net entropy of zero”.

*may not be from these rules at all.

Jethro 8:37 am 02 Sep 11

Jono said :

ImagineThat said :

… and not coming to a complete stop at a stop sign ….

OK. I’ll bite. What’s the difference between coming to a stop, and coming to a “complete stop”? The first means that you’re no longer moving. Presumably the second means that you’re really, really not moving?

I believe the following clip explains it.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=McW1wykqins

Tooks 8:00 am 02 Sep 11

“If the cops enforced traffic law:
a) the ACT government would be rich and
b) other crime would be rampant because the police would be too busy with all the traffic idiots”

Wrong on all counts. Traffic law is enforced (start with this story – is that not enforcement?) and the ACT government is not rich and other crime is not rampant.

Tooks 7:52 am 02 Sep 11

jessieduck said :

Jono said :

ImagineThat said :

… and not coming to a complete stop at a stop sign ….

OK. I’ll bite. What’s the difference between coming to a stop, and coming to a “complete stop”? The first means that you’re no longer moving. Presumably the second means that you’re really, really not moving?

You have to come to a complete stop at a stop sign- ie, don’t move until you count to three. If you just pause, it’s not a complete stop.

Please tell me you don’t really believe that.

bugmenot 7:29 am 02 Sep 11

And for the physicists in the room…

Are we ever truly stopped?

BenMac 11:37 pm 01 Sep 11

ImagineThat said :

Based on my observations, surely talking on a mobile phone (without a hands-free setup) while driving, and not coming to a complete stop at a stop sign would both top the Canberra Police ‘easy money’ list.

Your observations are based on the fact that your aren’t driving around in a marked police car. Of course someone will still talk on their phone in front of a nobody. Have a police car drive up behind you and most people will make sure they follow road rules (except for the idiots we read about in police media releases)

IrishPete 9:59 pm 01 Sep 11

Jono said :

jessieduck said :

You have to come to a complete stop at a stop sign- ie, don’t move until you count to three. If you just pause, it’s not a complete stop.

I assume (hope) that you’re joking here? Right??

I can count to three really quick. And I can come to a stop without the suspension rocking at all.

IP

IrishPete 9:58 pm 01 Sep 11

Aeek said :

ImagineThat said :

based on my observations, surely talking on a mobile phone (without a hands-free setup) while driving, and not coming to a complete stop at a stop sign would both top the Canberra Police ‘easy money’ list.

Cycling without a helmet would be even easier, but that might upset the international students.
Non enforcement sends a message.

Other easy money:
no lights on bicycles at night
cyclists not dismounting for pedestrian crossings (and going through them at speed of light but expecting cars to be able to stop for them)
tailgating, including the NSW traffic cop I saw doing it today so s/he could hide behind the car in front of him/her
cars with broken lights
cars with fog lights on weeks after the last reported fog
cars not indicating to change lanes
cars turning right from left hand lane of roundabouts (except for those mad roundabouts where you are actually allowed to, just to unnecessarily disrupt traffic flow!)
basically, having ACT number plates – because that’s a licence to drive badly in a badly maintained vehicle
oh, and diplomatic number plates, because that’s a licence to drive badly, sometimes in a very expensive vehicle
oh and taxi plates, because that’s also a licence to drive badly in a badly maintained vehicle

If the cops enforced traffic law:
a) the ACT government would be rich and
b) other crime would be rampant because the police would be too busy with all the traffic idiots

IP (who has never steered with a knee while using a handheld mobile phone and smoking a cigarette and drinking a coffee, honestly Ociffer)

Jono 9:51 pm 01 Sep 11

jessieduck said :

You have to come to a complete stop at a stop sign- ie, don’t move until you count to three. If you just pause, it’s not a complete stop.

I assume (hope) that you’re joking here? Right??

Aeek 9:23 pm 01 Sep 11

ImagineThat said :

based on my observations, surely talking on a mobile phone (without a hands-free setup) while driving, and not coming to a complete stop at a stop sign would both top the Canberra Police ‘easy money’ list.

Cycling without a helmet would be even easier, but that might upset the international students.
Non enforcement sends a message.

Henry82 9:22 pm 01 Sep 11

LSWCHP said :

This clown must’ve read that report and decided that it seemed like an obvious way to save time.

Yeah, its probably the first time in history someone has ever held their steering wheel with a knee.

Skidbladnir 9:19 pm 01 Sep 11

Jono said :

ImagineThat said :

… and not coming to a complete stop at a stop sign ….

OK. I’ll bite. What’s the difference between coming to a stop, and coming to a “complete stop”? The first means that you’re no longer moving. Presumably the second means that you’re really, really not moving?

Phases of stopping:
Brakes are applied.
Vehicle motion slows.
Forward motion reduces to near stop.
Wheels cease rotating.
Vehicle occupants believe car to be “stopped” in colloquial speech.
Vehicle rocks forwards.
Vehicle rocks backwards.
Rocking continues in decreasing magnitudes until springs and components are “at rest”.
No further forwards or backwards can be detected by astute eyes from a few paces away.

“Complete stop” achieved.

jessieduck 9:03 pm 01 Sep 11

Jono said :

ImagineThat said :

… and not coming to a complete stop at a stop sign ….

OK. I’ll bite. What’s the difference between coming to a stop, and coming to a “complete stop”? The first means that you’re no longer moving. Presumably the second means that you’re really, really not moving?

You have to come to a complete stop at a stop sign- ie, don’t move until you count to three. If you just pause, it’s not a complete stop.

LSWCHP 8:57 pm 01 Sep 11

Copy cat stupidity. Unfortunately I don’t have a reference, but a guy in England was busted a few weeks ago for doing about 70 mph on a motorway while talking on 2 phones and steering with his knees. This clown must’ve read that report and decided that it seemed like an obvious way to save time.

Jono 8:23 pm 01 Sep 11

Thoroughly Smashed said :

Ugh, Muphry’s Law (almost) strikes.

Muphry’s Law. One of my favourites.

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